Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/29/2024 in all areas

  1. For sure you'd need an older #1 coil. For the other coils: 2a: It's possible to swap the boots older-->newer, but you also need the spring 2b: You'd need to lengthen the boots, which would prevent spark plug contact, so this is a no-go. 2c: Since the older coils were intended for the older covers (aluminum), this is the most correct route. That's what the guy did in that Nico post (man...I barely had the truck 2 years when I was chiming in on that...how things have changed). That said, I did some R&D for you... Newer coil on left, older on right. When aligned by the mounting tabs, the older is about 1/2" longer. When aligned by boot length, they are the same length. The older coil's mounting tab sits above the plastic valve covers mounting hole by 1/2". As mentioned earlier, you can probably still fit the newer style in cylinders 2-6, but the coil has to be turned enough to avoid the mounting boss on the aluminum covers. You could possibly use a screw and washer in the boss to retain the coil to some degree. Taken apart, you can see all the parts are different. Although the spring in the older unit is quite longer, it sits deeper in the hole in the module. All the tube parts are shaped differently enough that fitment isn't great if you were to swap things around, but it's somewhat possible. With springs in and aligned by mounting tab, the older coil is still 1/2" longer. If you put the older style boot and older spring onto the newer style module, the boot fits nicely and everything else seems to be the correct length and position. Not that it matters here, but the newer boot will not fit the older module unless the top of the boot is cut off. Now, since the springs are different, I have no idea what impact it has switching it. I also don't know if you can get the boots and springs. I'd say that if you're at a junk yard and pulling them, you may as well just buy the complete coils. Although my personal opinion is that the additional cost to do this project doesn't really have much ROI, unless it's just cheaper than buying new plastic covers. Hope this helps.
    3 points
  2. The look on my dads face when I showed him the tool bag with the #6 tool was priceless. Had it out and replaced in 5 minutes, and any other R50 owner that hasn't used it is missing out!
    2 points
  3. 2 points
  4. The first thing you would want to do is check for leaks, the most common areas to check for leaks is where the aluminum lines are crimped onto the rubber hose on the low-pressure a/c line. This is the line that runs along the top front edge of your engine, if it's leaking it will be wet and greasy looking. If it's not leaking and you have verified the system has the correct amount of freon in it, then you can try cleaning your condenser and evaporator core. Here's a few videos for you to watch on the subject, there's also links in the video description for what you would need to clean your condenser and evaporator core. Chris.
    2 points
  5. Hey all, New member here. Got my 98 SE 4x4 last fall with about 98k miles single owner. Drove one in college in the late 90s and loved it. Was in the market for an inexpensive project vehicle that I could learn some auto mechanics on and turn into a capable 4x4 for some outdoor activities. Since I've been able to get the engine in good shape by changing belts, fluids, seals, water pump, as well as upgraded the suspension with an KYB/OME lift. I was also able to cash in on the strut tower rust recall. This website has been a treasure of info and am glad registration is back up. Looking forward to participating and keeping this place going.
    2 points
  6. Not sure how long the forum was down, but it was caused by a PHP error on the server. And a thanks goes out to @adamzan for bringing it to my attention.
    2 points
  7. Some good progress yesterday and today! Nothing major, but big little steps, so to speak. Yesterday drilled some holes in the chassis rail to mount up the steering box so I could confirm fitment. Box is a little closer to the wheel well than I had mocked up, but still clears fine. Box is rigged in there with some spacers for the time being until I get all the plate work designed out and the bolt sleeves in hand. With box temporarily attached, I was able to measure up for the steering link and get to chopping the R50 and WJ units. The WJ shaft normally has about 10" of slip, but in it's reduced form now only has about 2.5". I couldn't really get more because I needed to keep enough round tube at the end for the splined end from the R50 shaft...but since the R50 shaft also tapers down, that piece also needed to retain enough length. Total shaft length ends up around 16". The R50 shaft OD is about 1/16" smaller than the WJ shaft ID, so I hammered some 1/32" washers around the shaft, tacked them on, smoothed them out, and ended up with a nice friction fit that also kept the splined end centered nicely. Main thing here was remembering to align the flat part in the spline upwards and perpendicular to the flat sides of the WJ shaft. Also got around to chopping off the leaf spring perches on the axle, since they obstruct where I'll need to mount the FJ radius arms. The passenger side wasn't too bad since it was just a cast piece welded to the tube. The driver's side perch, on the other hand, is cast into the housing but fortunately wasn't too bad. Attacked it with a cut-off wheel and my cheap HF sawzall. Still need to measure up the arms and design some brackets. Shipped up the D44 hubs to Towndawg for his magic touch. They've got a fancy industrial CNC machine at work that will be making the tone rings, so I'm excited to see how that turns out and getting them onto the modified hubs so I can work on the backing plate for the calipers and ABS sensor. He's also going to turn some custom hub adapters that'll support the 108mm rotor and a wheel spacer up to 1.5" (I plan to run the 1" I already have), and then narrow down to 100mm for Nissan wheels.
    2 points
  8. Whoops! I'm an idiot. I've still got you covered. Pull the kick panel under the dash, then pull out the foam in there and you'll find the hose tucked back in there.
    2 points
  9. If you're still running the factory mechanical cluch cooling fan, make sure the clutch is still in good condition. There should be some resistance when rotating by hand with the engine off. If you try to push it really fast and it keeps spinning, this is your issue. Does the engine maintain proper temp for a long time at idle with the A/C off? The fan should be able to keep the engine cool at idle for a long period of time with out over heating. Its also possible the pressure sensor could be going faulty, and looking at a service manual diagram there isn't a temperature sensor for the refrigerant. (HA-31)
    1 point
  10. If the system hasn't been charged since factory, its possible the pressure isn't as high as it used to be. My brother's WD21 will blow warm then cold repeatedly while hearing the compressor kicking on and off. This is usually the sign of low refrigerant. Heat also expands, so its possible when it gets warm the refrigerant is getting to a high enough temperature for the system to "function". The VG has a weird adapter harness so the connection might be loose on one of the plugs. Not 100% on the VQ, I'd have to look at my donor car to know for sure. Testing for 12V at the plug should give a pretty good indication on how the system is functioning. 12V should turn on the compressor, and 0V off.
    1 point
  11. I got a payout, based on the cost to repair, so saving the labour doing the panel work myself I should have enough to get it repainted You're right parts are getting really hard to find. Almost tempted to get another parts truck...
    1 point
  12. If anyone ever finds themselves looking for these connectors because they also want to reuse the factory harness. Use part number: 12015792 Delphi Weather Pack Someone on the facebook group managed to reverse image search for them online. I'll just order new connectors
    1 point
  13. I just airdrop to my macbook and export from the default photos app. It has options for quality and size. Assuming other photo editing apps have similar (there's probably some free apps on iphone but haven't researched)
    1 point
  14. I believe this to be forum page Slart was referencing though. https://www.clubfrontier.org/threads/distributor-rebuild-on-the-cheap-for-1st-gen-nissan-frontier-xterra.350719/
    1 point
  15. Looks like Wes answered this the last time you asked.
    1 point
  16. This is great info. Thanks
    1 point
  17. Looks like a clean rig!
    1 point
  18. I successfully changed my first timing belt/water pump/drive belts/cam and crank shaft seals thanks in large part to the info here. I'll share some tips from it here that I put on the npora facebook group a few weeks ago: My first timing belt replacement is done. Pathy runs smoothly. Replaced timing belt, water pump, cam and crankshaft seals, coolant hoses, and drive belts. Here are a few tips for anyone who tries this in the future... The 1A auto YouTube tutorial on R50s is superb. Following it will set you right - https://youtu.be/awjqoFUUPSo?si=6Avjp9Q6ivaIk-UO the Nissan repair manual is good to have as well. (get it on the NICO Club forum) Use the OEM crankshaft seal. I went through 3 seals because the inner lip would get caught on the shaft and fold under. The Nissan seal was built better (and pre-lubed) The harmonic balance puller is fantastic for pulling the crank pulley right off. I bought a kit for like 20 bucks on Amazon (you can also get a loaner from the autoparts store), and got the bolts for it at the hardware store (m6 x 1.0 x 75mm - same size as the long upper left bolt in the lower timing cover) An impact wrench is key. Used it for getting off/on the crankshaft bolt and the cam bolts without turning the shafts. I also used a camshaft holder tool once the belt was off. I debated on whether to remove the air compressor like the video suggests or try to jimmy the timing cover off around it. I was able to get the timing cover off with some work, but getting it on was tougher, and scary (I didn't want to break my A/C or mess with my timing bel. Moving the compressor was easier than I thought. The power steering tensioner bolt was a PITA because of where it was located. a 12mm ratcheting wrench would've been nice Tighten your belts. The first time I turned on the engine it was like the loudest chalkboard screech I've ever heard. Finally, there's a right-angle coolant hose that sits behind the timing belt cover that's a PITA to get off/on. I ended up having success using a chisel to pry it on. Make sure the clamp tabs aren't facing out when you put the timing cover back on, or it can bend the cover, possibly interfering with the belt. I of course read this in the repair manual after the cover and cam sprockets were back on.
    1 point
  19. Hey guys I just picked up a 2002 QX4 with sunroof, two tone, no heated seats or steering wheel, and I don’t think it has a LSD Other than a blower motor I did once upon a long time ago, this is my first experience with a R50! Im excited. Not much experience with Japanese autos. Mostly German. excited to drive my Pathfinder/QX4 to work, with my very young son, to the recycling dump, and whatever else. Will try to keep it in the family for as long as I can. Hopefully, Lord willing, not too many hiccups along the way! I found the forum while looking for creature comfort mods. What is everyone doing for infotainment?
    1 point
  20. I'll bet this is a quirk of the Ackermann angle. When you're turning, both front wheels follow curved paths, but the inside wheel follows a tighter curve, so it has to steer sharper. The geometry to make this happen is built into the knuckles (where the tie rod attaches vs where the knuckle pivots). The farther you turn, the more the Ackermann kicks in. This also means that any error in the geometry will show up more the farther you're turned. Anything suspension-related tends to be at its worst at the limits of its travel anyway. I'm guessing the steering angles at full lock don't quite agree on how tight of a turn you're taking, which means one wheel or the other has to slip, which is more dramatic on the polished concrete than it is on normal road surfaces. Strato's wheel offset is an interesting wrinkle to this. Changing the offset wouldn't change the angles, but it would change the curve of the paths they're on--evidently enough to get them closer to where the wheels are pointing. Now that I'm thinking about it, I don't think I've ever driven mine in a parking garage, but I have noticed that it disturbs gravel more at full lock. Probably the same thing going on. In any case, Ackermann is not adjustable (apart from racecar stuff), so I'd file this one under It Just Does That. It's also possible I'm full of crap. But if you're not in 4x, then it's not torque binding. If a tire was hitting something in the wheel well, which would make sense with it only happening at full lock, I imagine you would've noticed the noise or seen the shiny spot. I've heard of the rear limited slip chattering if it's got the wrong lube in it, but I wouldn't expect that to only happen when you're against the steering stops.
    1 point
  21. My Xterra has done this forever... I think it is a normalish thing for solid axle part time 4wd vehicles.
    1 point
  22. I'm going to say this is normal because my parents are the original owners of my 97, and when I started driving it my dad always warned me about taking corners too fast for that reason. Since getting some Offset wheels and the lift there is no more of this wheel hop at all. My dad would say it was always on the right hand turns it would hop the most for him.
    1 point
  23. I recommend having your Alternator and battery tested. Chris
    1 point
  24. No progress today, but yesterday I felt confident enough in axle placement to cut up my last piece of tubing for the drag link, so now I can talk about the steering setup. The approach here is what the SAS community calls "GM 1-ton TREs". Several 4wd shops sell these kits as "Y-Link" setups. Since this axle came with a Heim kit that was mostly welded up (drag link was ready to be cut to length), I'm just using the tubing but cut the pieces in a manner that retained some length with the bungs previously welded in (project foreshadowing: looks like I'm making Heim jointed upper trailing arms when I focus on the rear axle). The tubing is 1.5" OD x 0.250" wall...it's beefy. The TREs have 1" shafts, so they're beefy, too. I used the following SKP parts from Rock Auto: Tie rod: SES2233L & SES2234R Drag link: SES2027L & SES2026R TREs ran about $28 for all before tax/shipping, and then another $30 for LH/RH threaded bungs and jam nuts off a shop on ebay. Also needed a 1.5" TPF (taper per foot) or 7° reamer, which ran another $77. The reamer is necessary because the 2233L piece and the pitman arm need to be reamed out. The nice part about this is spares are cheap and easy to obtain, but one part does need to be reamed beforehand. The end result: Drag link's at about 6°, which is not too bad. Currently projecting (aiming for) 4" of up-travel, and this position is good enough to keep the tie rod off the pitman joint, and that's really about the only constraint I needed to be mindful of this. There's otherwise plenty of clearance; next closest thing is the drag link below the oil filter, but still ample space. Hidden in that last pic is a very crude placement of the PHB, which should fit really nicely in there. The drag link ended up being 37" center-center, and the PHB will be at 33". I couldn't find much info about the effect of differing lengths, but should be easily to keep them parallel. The PHB is from a JK Wrangler and has hump/kickout for diff cover clearance. The first pic also has the FJ arm wired up. I'm pretty satisfied with the angles and planned placement. Just need to get the plates CAD'd up and cut. Hard to tell with the angle, but the rear eye is just inboard of chassis rail, so it fortunately won't have a big cantilever. Figuring to weld on brackets for the mounts, with a middle removable crossmember. I'm stalled a little on progress because I'm not liking how I've got the engine slung up. Having the support bar at an angle causes the legs on the passenger side to be lower than the driver's side, which is cause the engine to be supported a little crooked. I realized this when I attempted to reinstall the subframe so I could confirm the engine was at the correct height (my decision to do this ended up being a terrible one...installing the subframe was far more difficult than removing it). The real problem is Nissan failing to put any reasonable sling points on the engine. I can't even wrap a strap under the engine without fear of it crushing a tube, or bending something. I mean, the KA in my Frontier already has slingers attached...from the factory...and you could pull that engine out with crowbar. The VQ points are ridiculous obnoxious and inaccessible...not to mention basically requiring genuine Nissan slingers that don't exist (and wouldn't do me any good anyway). So, I'm trying to make slingers I can leave attached for future use. The driver's side is done. The passenger side has been a total ishtshow. I can't even remove the RH bracket to weld something because half the bolts are obstructed by the exhaust manifold. After a couple hours of ideas and measurements, I think I have a plan of attack, which I'll make tomorrow and get the engine re-slung.
    1 point
  25. I have learned a great deal from watching Eric O of SMA, kind of funny I'm currently watching a video of him troubleshooting an ABS issue and making an educated guess. If you ask me it's right in sync with the issue at hand that we are having with our R50's. So Unfortunately I was not able to clean my OEM MAF Sensor because I was not able to locate any MAF cleaner at the local parts stores(they were all sold out for some strange reason). I guess you can say that my OEM MAF Sensor was no longer serviceable due to a rusty and stripped-out screw, so I would not have been able to remove it from the housing to thoroughly clean it anyway so I just replaced it with the new sensor and housing I ordered. From what I could see through the mesh on the front of the old MAF housing the filament was indeed dirty, so long story short it seems to have fixed my stumbling idle issues, and my R50 idles smooth again. The replacement MAF now reads closer to 3.5 g/s once the engine has reached operating temp vs the previous 2.97 g/s with the old MAF Sensor, I would also like to mention that I now have better acceleration too, and the fuel trims are slowly working their way back down. So If you tried cleaning your MAF and that didn't correct the issue just replace it. Here's a picture of my OEM MAF Sensor and housing. Respectfully your R50 rough idle and poor fuel economy "Guinea Pig" https://imgur.com/a/O5RxWIk Chris.
    1 point
  26. I'm running Jeg's 16x8 steelies. It has a bit more offset though. Part number 555-681034 (Less than $80 right now) JEGS 555-681034 D Window Wheel [Size: 16" x 8"] Black - JEGS Size: 16" x 8" Bolt Pattern: 6 x 5.50" Back Spacing: 4.00" Offset: -12 mm Center Bore: 4.25 I ran 265 65r16 tires on them. Without a lift, they stick out and they won't tuck in the fenders during flexing and if you bottom out, the tire rubs in the back. If you're lifted, then they tuck in the fenders when flexing.
    1 point
  27. Screw and two clips, though be careful as there’s a clip in the center of the panel piece…if any plastic is going to break off, it’ll be at that point. At least that’s how it seemed on mine.
    1 point
  28. Sounds like you're on the right track. I saw in an SMA video a while back that g/s at warm idle is usually close to the engine displacement, which agrees with your old 3.5g/s reading. A messed-up sensor would explain the trims and the g/s being off. Good luck cleaning the old MAF--and good thinking having a new one on hand.
    1 point
  29. This looks great. Any updates? There aren't too many SAS r50 around and most of them seem to be hack jobs. Of course knowing you, yours will be the outlier!
    1 point
  30. I haven't cleaned my maf sensor yet, but I was looking at some live data on my scan tool and at first I was seeing a little over 3.5 g/s at idle now I'm seeing 2.97 g/s consistently. So I think we might be on the right path regarding your under-reporting hypothesis. My fuel trims are extremely high as well, I'm currently averaging about 200 miles per tank prior to this issue I was averaging about 280 miles per tank. I ordered a new maf sensor, but before I swap it out I'm gonna try cleaning the OEM one and report back with my findings. Chris.
    1 point
  31. I played it dangerous and wiped the actual elements. They're delicate, but they're not made of cotton candy, and they're pretty easy to get to on mine. I think you're supposed to just blast them with MAF cleaner, but either I didn't have the right stuff handy or the gunk wasn't budging, so I very gently wiped off the rest. Anything that insulates them will cause the sensor to under-report. Given the limited access on yours, I'd be tempted to see what the ultrasonic cleaner would do about it. Too bad about the smoke machine. Maybe try a lower oil level? I used a proper shop one once, and was not a fan of the smell, but it did work pretty well. Does seem a bit odd to be fogging the engine with glycerine, but I haven't heard of it causing problems.
    1 point
  32. The last few days have largely been spent measuring and CAD'ing things. Latest efforts have been towards designing the plate work on the driver's side chassis rail in the engine bay. In general, I'll plate the top, side, and bottom of the rail about 24" to provide the provisions for the steering box, panhard mount, motor mount perch, and bump stops/limit straps. The passenger side will be different since I only need a plate with provisions for the motor mount perch and bump/limit components. This plate will be bolt on, though. There's vast difference in working space between the LH and RH sides of the rail. I'd have to tear down the engine further (coolant pipes, exhaust manifold) to have better top access, but then there's still an AC line right on top of the rail that I'm not going to relocate or weld around...can't even slip 3/16" plate under it. But, I have a good bolt-on plan. Speaking of motor mounts, I finally welded up a poly set. This will be the gear box placement. Hard to see with shadows, but there's clearance at all points so zero need to cut the wheel well. Placement is 1.25" above the rail, and 0.5" off it. The rail tapers in that area so my plating approach will also square it up. However, this placement will have the metal edge of the radiator right up to it and obstructs the fan shroud. The radiator will be moved 1/2" over and planning to heat the fan shroud up and reshape it. I also forgot to mock this up with the airbox initially, but it cleared just enough. The high pressure line will be routed under the engine. Should work great because it'll be tucked up with other oil lines, is within reach of the pressure sensor, and the pump's OE hardline already points downward in that direction (assuming I can use part of the OE line). Reamed out a tie-rod and the pitman to accept the larger GM TREs. That was sucky process, but it got done. This is one thing where I need to keep in mind that some trail spares need to be modified in advance. Work on the brakes and ABS design still a work in progress. I discovered the R50 calipers mount a lot closer to the hub center than I thought they would...my initial (mis)calculation showed me they'd be fully obstructed, so I had a small panic until I realized I used the wrong measurement in my math. Still, fitment is tight. Going with 4th Gen 4Runner rotors (also FJ Cruiser and 05+ Tacoma) instead. Same nominal thickness as R50 and H3 (28mm), but slightly larger diameter than H3 (300mm vs 315mm vs 319mm). I'll take any additional clearance I can get. Plus, I figure there will be more support for Toy parts in the long run...or in my case, more RockAuto clearance options. But, before I could pull the trigger on returning the H3 rotors and buying the 4R ones, I fired up the CNC router to make a bracket to visualize the general placement. This isn't the exact depth the caliper (it is the exact distance outward it will be), just a general placement so I could confirm things clear. That's right: I can wear sandals in my garage during the winters here. Though, I do wear steel-toed shoes for projects like this. Saw one thread of a guy SAS'ing his Tacoma...he dropped a Dana 60 on his big toe. "¡Adios!" - toenail. I don't know the physics behind caliper placement, but my understanding is it matters. The R50 and D44 calipers are mounted higher, but I have obvious constraints here. The mock-up put them vertically, but I should be able to rotate them up a few more degrees. The main problem with doing these brake mockups is that can't fit the rotors until the hub is turned down to fit inside the rotors (D44 brakes normally mount to the back of the hub). Fortunately, unlike the H3 rotor, I was able to attach the 4R rotor to the backside so I could good reference distances. I'll need to go a slightly different direction for the tone ring. New plan is to make larger tone rings that'll move the sensor up and out, but also avoid taking too much meat off the hub, particularly where it'd overlap where the inner bear race is installed. The general idea:
    1 point
  33. I found myself in the exact same situation as you about a year ago Eric. I ended up going your initial route with the rear OME MD springs (2922) and it improved so many aspects of the vehicle I never regretted it. Now I personally kind of like the raked out look combined with the fact that I carry a lot of gear on weekends heading to the mountains it seemed like the perfect solution. Well I will say after installing the MD springs just in the rear, it was too stink bug looking even for me, I didn't let it stay like that for long. With likely sagging front springs as well, the disparagement was too much so after a couple months I decided to put MD springs in the front too. For a while I debated whether to actually do the Light Duty springs over the MD because I liked the raked look. Well I'm very glad I didn't, so much so I also added the Rocky-Road front trim packer with my MD springs because I wasn't happy with just the MD springs up front. Even after the springs settle, with just MD in the rear I think it would be too much of a difference. When people say 2" lift, that's from the sagged out state. It's 0.75" of lift over the stock from the factory height. I'd recommend actually just going ahead and doing the OME 2922s in the rear for now and when the funds permit go with the matching springs in the front. You won't regret it and in the meantime the handling of your Pathfinder will feel like new. Despite what people say, worn out springs also have a huge contributor to body roll and polar moment of inertia. My guess is if you went with a factory like replacement for example from Moog, you'd wished you had gotten a lift.
    1 point
  34. If it wasn't a billion dollars to get one over here I probably would have done that already. Then there is the fact it is RHD, though it would probably be pretty simple to convert to LHD with a parts truck...
    1 point
  35. Sure, pal! I'm waiting for my D2S bulbs. I am tempted to take them off my other car but I'm sure Mr monkey-hands will damage them. Wiring is all done and this has been by far the easiest retrofit I've done. No wire stripping, no drilling or dremeling and the shrouds are like tailor made for the reflector bowl. The only problem has been finding where to mount the ballasts, but mostly because I want them hidden. I don't like the blacked out headlight look so I'll try to avoid painting the reflector bowl unless I see stray reflections that could cause glare. Once I get the bulbs and make sure the cutoff is straight, I will post some pics.
    1 point
  36. Couldn't stand my stock headlights any longer. In the middle of retrofitting Morimoto D2S 5.0 HID projectors:
    1 point
  37. Nistune, maybe? They don't officially support Pathfinders, but My1Path got one working on his WD21 ECU, probably because the computer was similar enough to one of the models that they do support. There may be a similar close-enough compatibility to get one running on the R50. I don't know if anyone's done it yet.
    1 point
  38. Put a new cheapo Dual deck in. I’ve had her now 6 years and have loved every minute. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  39. Well since the host of the site had a failure a few days ago, I'll go ahead and toss in a recap to the build from May 2021 to present since some of my build posts are gone. 2001 SE Grille: Kind of a rare find since the Bronzed Gray paint only existed in 2001 and 2002. Found it listed in a local part out. Sadly the part out had worse paint on the hood and fenders than mine but I digress. Powerstop z36 front brake kit. Local guy had a wrecked R50 that I was buying parts from. He had these new in box and wanted me to take/buy them. I didn't need brakes so I was like "uh, I can do $20" and he handed them over. For daily driving and wheeling they don't feel any different than my stock discs and pads but whatevs. Poly steering rack bushings form 4x4parts.com I rebuilt the front end with new cv axles, inner+outer tie rods, ball joints, inner+outer bearings, and rack bushings trying to find a popping noise that ended up being a control arm bushing. They don't appear to drive or feel special but I think polyurethane is supposed to be more resilient to oil than rubber so that's comforting to know while I procrastinate on replacing leaky valve covers. Missing link Made this from 1.5" x 1.5" 1/8" steel square tubing. 23 7/8" long. Ends chopped at 45 degrees. Couldn't feel any difference driving or wheeling. This later got modified for a skid plate a few months later. Skidplate. Had some trails at the offroad park that couldn't be finished because I lacked armor. After getting scammed on cheap rock sliders and Lokka taking 9 months to ship my part, my wife was very leery about me spending big bucks on car parts so I took matters into my own inexperienced hands to make my own skidplates. 3/16 thick 24x48 steel was "only" $96 so I started. I first modified the missing link by adding a 1" spacer from square tubing so the plate steel would clear the front diff. I measured and cut out the mid skid and made notches for the rear control arm bolts. I turned a lot of drill bits into smoke so drilling this took forever. I cut the front skid and notched it with an angle grinder. Apparently the plate steel had a wave to it and made it difficult to notch with the angle grinder without puncturing through the back side. Welded the creases and cleaned up the mill scale and welds after several hours Painted it with flat black rust converter for easy touch ups. Found some bolts at the hardware store. Got some washers for rocks to deflect off. Mounted it up. Just enough clearance between plate and diff Took it to the offroad park and hit the trails I had to turn around on last time. Got some scars to test it out. I think it's a winner. Whenever time allows, I'll see about making a rear skid. So that's a wrap on the build as it sits now.
    1 point
  40. Yep. That will work. That is similar to my starter fix for the auto trans Pathfinder. Just replace the fuel pump with starter in the connections in your diagram. Your source wire from the battery should have a fuse for safety, 15 amp should be good. Bad grounds create so many fun problems on modern cars, even in the older EFI engines like our old WD21's.
    1 point
  41. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  42. One important thing about #1 that I forgot to mention is that the rear of the chassis is also supported by jack stands. That is, you need 4 jack stands and a good floor jack to do this. In the first pic, the red jack stand set is used for supporting and pivoting the axle, but there's also a silver jack stand set (the driver's side one is just visible over the floor jack) that the truck is resting on them. Amended (clarified) instructions: 1. Lift the rear of the truck and use jack stands to support the rear chassis. There are oval-ish jack/support pads under the rear passenger doors on the unibody rail. Height of the truck depends on your jack stands...lift as high as possible, reasonable, and safe. I've used blocks to gain a few more inches to my basic 2-ton stands (it becomes especially helpful if installing lift springs and/or spacers). A proper floor jack (2.5-ton+) is capable of lifting the entire rear of the truck just by placing the jack directly under the rear diff. 2. With chassis supported, lift the rear axle and support both sides with jack stands on their highest setting. Position the jack stands under the lower spring perches, leaving enough room for your jack between the jackstand and axle end. 3. Remove the tires 4. Disconnect the shocks at the bottom, or remove them altogether. 5. Place your floor jack near the end of the axle. Lift the axle up enough to clear the jack stand, then remove the jack stand from the area. 6. Slowly lower the jack, allowing the axle to pivot on the opposite jack stand. Watch for line stretch if applicable. 7. As the end of the axle gets lower, the spring will decompress, and eventually loosen in the seat 8. When the axle is as low as reasonable, you should be able to lift the spring up to clear the lower perch, then tilt the bottom out and slide the spring down off the bump stop. (In my pic, the axle is resting on the drum, but that hasn't always been necessary if you can get the chassis supported high enough.) 9. Re-use the rubber spring pieces and install the new spring and/or spacers by reversing step #8. 10. Lift the end of the axle with the jack until axle, put the jack stand from step #5 back in place, and lower the axle onto the jack stand. 11. Repeat steps 5-10 on the other side of the axle. 12. Once both springs are in, reconnect/install the shocks, put the tires back on, and lift the truck off all 4 jack stands.
    1 point
  43. Madhakish, I'm in St. Paul, so I know exactly what you are talking about. My '95 rusted out from under me. Still have it just because I'm not done taking parts from it. I bought a '94 SE from another board member who lives in Florida earlier this year. No rust and because he was a board member I knew he'd taken care of it. Was no big deal to fly down and drive it back. I'd consider the same option if I were you. But of course if you need something right now you might have to look elsewhere. Good luck!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...