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Due to a hardware failure on the hosts systems, all posts and messages created between May 26th and Jan 13th have been lost. Additionally, if you joined the NPORA Forums community during that time, you'll need to re-register. -NPORA Mod Team *Updated: 05/19/2022 12:15AM PST

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  1. Update Pt2 Way back in April 2021 I ordered a Lokka and finally received it in December. Due to work killing us slowly with overtime, I just started working with in in June. I wanted to go the route that @PathyDude17went by getting a front 4.636 diff and a rear 4.636 lsd diff to pair with the Lokka. Rear diff I did some homework on NPORA and FSM about choosing and removing the diff, so I set out to the junkyard with tools and found a 2001 Xterra with the orange "LSD oil only" sticker. Door jam said HG46 so I started wrenching. Never bothered checking backlash or runout on the ring gear, but I couldn't see or feel any issues with it. Install went pretty smooth. I of course used a new gasket, and lsd additive. One thing i noticed is that there doesn't seem to be any torque spec for the brake line where it attaches to the drum, so I just went by feel on that. Front diff I found a 2000 QX4 that had the HG46 indicated on the firewall plate so I grabbed it from salvage. Removal is pretty easy if you know how to crack loose the driveshaft nuts and remove cv axles. The front diff, I verified runout and backlash before I started getting too far into the lokka install. Installing the lokka wasn't too awful, it was just time consuming and the printed instructions aren't worded very well. Thankfully Tyler has his install video on YouTube to show us how it's done in normal english with good visuals. I went ahead and ordered the associated items from the links on his YouTube channel and found the punches very handy. I ended up not using most of the oil seals from the parts order because I didn't see any evidence of oil leakage on the donor vehicle and removing the seals was going to be a time consuming pain. I stupidly put my house up for sale on the market while I had my pathfinder on jack stands, oil on the driveway and diff parts on my work bench, so I really had to kick things in gear and get this put back together before people started showing up to check out the home. From what I remember, there were some diff parts that were particularly tough to separate that Tyler didn't have trouble with and a part or two that came off really easy where Tyler had to get creative to remove. I suppose no two diffs are the exact same. I did have to shim mine to get it into tolerance. My gap was too large so I cut up some .005" shim stock with scissors to make some spacers to get the unit in spec. The hardest part about the diff was installing into the subframe, that was definitely a two person job without using a trans jack. With the Lokka in the diff and the diff in the Pathfinder, the unit seemed to perform as expected by turning wheels and driveshaft by hand in the various scenarios. With the humble house being turned into a public showroom, I would have to wait to test it on the trails for a couple weeks while I waited for life to settle for a bit. Results: The HG46 diff set made a noticeable difference in acceleration. Acceleration wise, it felt like i went back to my 31.6" tires from my 32.87" tires When I was rushing to get the Pathfinder put together and moved for house selling, I did notice the LSD stiffness was about 50-60 ft lbs by feel. How I figure that is by having the rear axle on jack stands, tires on, torque wrench set to 100 ftlbs (lug nut specs), I could get about halfway (my super calibrated arms) to 100 ftlbs on the lugnut before the lsd would give in and let the wheel slip. Obviously, i'm measuring a couple inches out by pulling on the lug nuts and not the center of the axle, and the torque wrench angle plays a factor and my arms aren't a measuring device but a weak speculative data point is still a data point. It has only rained once since I swapped diffs so I don't have much wet street experience, but I did take it around the neighborhood when it did rain. wheel slippage didn't occur on gentle driving. I did intentionally stomp the gas for a turn and both tires lit up to my delight. Offroad, the lsd has exceeded my expections. I usually don't dare driving 2wd on Ozarks river rock because I sunk my tacoma pretty good doing that before, but I figured I'd see what the lsd would do. I could feel the rear tires slightly slipping and digging. All it takes is one tire to become the one wheel wonder for a single rotation and you're sunk. The back tires worked in unison and we kept chugging forward. Further on the trail, I kept it in 2wd and cleared some familiar spots that are prone to back wheel spin, but none of that happened. With the star of the project being the Lokka, I drove deeper into the trail to find the tricky stuff. There's a spot where you flex out and 3 wheel it that requires momentum if you're working from bottom to top of trail. Lokka crawled at the slowest possible speeds without issue. I made efforts to climb to rock steps. I had mixed success with that. Video shows the lokka working, but the driver needs more IQ/effort and the tires need less air pressure. Descending trails with lokka is normal unless you stab the throttle while turning, then the lokka lets you know it's there by resisting the steering wheel inputs. Climbing trails with lokka is different because there's times it tells you it's in charge depending on the terrain, steering angle and throttle input. Turning radius can be increase at times with the Lokka. I found that using 2wd is more rewarding with the LSD because it has easy steering, However, the Lokka will let you get the highlight moments of wheeling that you're going to remember the rest of the year. Hopefully after some real estate transactions, I can go back to the trails with 20 psi in the tires and more time to get a better feel. Also, I have tons of detailed photos of the Lokka install, included shim installation. If there isn't one already, anyone want a post with tons of photos for a Lokka install walkthrough?
    7 points
  2. Hey R50 people! You might have seen my posts on Facebook groups or instagram, but I also wanted to be present here as I've enjoyed browsing this forum numbers of time. Those of you who don't know me, I'm based in Vancouver BC Canada and I created a sweet roof rack for all R50 models. I was inspired by Prinsu obviously and since there are no aftermarket solutions for R50 I decided to make my own rack. Please check out some details, information, manual and more photos at my google drive: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/14yxt2aZX2_KDKsw74M9Ft5XpMms7hF-H?usp=sharing Let me know if you have any questions! I've sold a few already so you might start seeing those racks on R50s! Thanks! Pawel
    6 points
  3. R33 GTST brake calipers Unfortunately these use smaller 19mm bolts and would either need the following to run safely: - sleeves through the knuckle, or - re-thread/tap? the calipers to fit the bigger 22mm bolts.
    6 points
  4. Wow it’s been some time! I was browsing the r50 section to see what might be new and I figured I might as well throw up an update in case anyone cares. The truck is now at 320,000 miles, still going strong. Worst thing to happen since my last update was an small evap leak, everything else works like new. I’ve got a code for the swirl control system but haven’t been able to track it down yet. Doesn't affect drivability as far as I can tell, so it’s likely one of the million parameters involved in its operation is slightly out of spec for what the system is looking to see. I’ve tested the valve itself and the vacuum lines around it, no issues. Eventually Ill need to sort it out so I can pass emissions, but whatever it’s on the back burner for now. There’s a slight weep from the rear diff, most likely the pinion seal. I need to do the rear wheel bearings, drums, and axle seals all together so I’m planning it for some time over the summer. My girlfriends 4runner needs that same treatment but a little more desperately since her drums are soaked in gear oil so it takes priority over mine at the moment. My engine still leaks oil like crazy, no matter which stop leak I use. I gave up at some point and now I just run maxlife blend 10w-40 which seems to keep it under control better than the mobile 1 did. If I’m driving it a lot every day I go through about a quart per week, but luckily I’m working from home these days so I can keep the oil consumption to a minimum. I also changed the radiator and hoses, along with the two front cam position sensors and fan+clutch as preventative maintenance. Got the front shaft U-joints swapped out and balanced by a driveline shop so there’s no more rumbling on the highway. In the late fall my dad and I took the two pathfinders out to the Logandale trail network outside of Vegas to blast through the sandy canyons a bit. Super fun spot, but my skinny tires were a little bit out of their comfort zone in some of the really deep sand. Especially because the tread depth is getting pretty low. I’ve had the tires since March 2020 I think? So probably 35K miles at least, with about 6-10 months of usable tread left at this rate. My JEGS jerry can go stolen from the back of the truck over the winter. Some bastard cut the ratchet strap while it was parked. People are getting desperate with the gas prices being the way they are. So when I replaced the can I also built in a simple swing open locking mechanism to keep casual thieves from trying. It’s not impenetrable obviously, but so far no one has messed with it. I also got a nice set of seat covers so I don’t have to look at the ugly cuts and tears in my seats anymore. I think they look great now A few weeks ago I welded up some basic low profile rock sliders to help deflect the odd boulder that might want to smack the rocker panels this summer. They mount up using the original mounts for the side steps like most other guys have done. The only exception is the middle bracket had to be modified to get the right height. I tested them with my jack and they’re easily strong enough to use for lifting a wheel. My goal was to lose as little ground clearance as possible, so I made them fit nice and tight to the body, with just enough gap to be able to flex slightly upwards under load without touching. It’s a very basic setup but I’m happy to have that extra bit of protection just in case. You can hardly even tell they’re there In preparation for the season I also swapped out my rusted and damaged smitty trail jack for a hi lift extreme 48” which is much nicer quality and should last forever. I plan to keep it covered in WD40 to keep the rust away and I wipe on a light coat every couple weeks. I’ve padlocked it to the mount just in case Last but not least, I noticed my driver side CV was starting to rattle when I was going over small bumps. At first it sounded like something was loose in the suspension but it turned out to be the inner joint. When I tried to turn the shaft back and forth by hand it had noticeable play. Being that I didn’t want to break it on the trail again like last year, I swapped it out for a new one. The brand is GSP I think? Fairly cheap. Absolutely zero binding at full droop, even with no sway bar, and it’s actually so smooth I had to double check that my hub was really engaged. Time will tell if it lasts, but overall it seems to be good quality. I just wish I had the motivation and time to swap my Rockford boots onto it. From what I can tell, this one seems to be in the pre-facelift style with the round flange rather than the tri-flange shape, which I believe means it should have a slightly better range of motion (provided its made to OE spec) because I think I read somewhere the earlier models had slightly longer struts. Anyway, I think that just about covers everything I’ve done in the last several months. Next up this year Ill be redoing the rear bumper with plate steel now that I have a garage again. Even though mine is still functional, I’m sick of the plastic bumper cover. Then maybe I’ll look into some aluminum skids and a locker. It’s shaping up to be an awesome summer, I’m super excited to hit the trails again.
    5 points
  5. Well it appears we lost almost a year of posts here so I thought I'd repost some of what I had done in that time just in case any of it will be helpful to anyone in the future. U-Bolts for mounting X-Bull type traction boards to the SE Roof Rack. I added adhesive felt to the top, and shrink wrap to the bottom to help protect the rack: Installed Midland MXT275 mobile GMRS radio installed in upper-portion of the center console with supplied antenna on the roof (excuse all the dog hair in these shots): Short antenna from cravenspeed.com. I was tired of the huge factory antenna getting hung up on branches of narrow trails. This is listed on their site as a Nissan Frontier part but works great: And some beauty shots C/O @PathyDude17 & @zakzackzachary & myself, as well as a video walkaround on Tyler's channel: Up next is a set of skid plates & missing link that is on order from SF Creation...
    5 points
  6. Well since the host of the site had a failure a few days ago, I'll go ahead and toss in a recap to the build from May 2021 to present since some of my build posts are gone. 2001 SE Grille: Kind of a rare find since the Bronzed Gray paint only existed in 2001 and 2002. Found it listed in a local part out. Sadly the part out had worse paint on the hood and fenders than mine but I digress. Powerstop z36 front brake kit. Local guy had a wrecked R50 that I was buying parts from. He had these new in box and wanted me to take/buy them. I didn't need brakes so I was like "uh, I can do $20" and he handed them over. For daily driving and wheeling they don't feel any different than my stock discs and pads but whatevs. Poly steering rack bushings form 4x4parts.com I rebuilt the front end with new cv axles, inner+outer tie rods, ball joints, inner+outer bearings, and rack bushings trying to find a popping noise that ended up being a control arm bushing. They don't appear to drive or feel special but I think polyurethane is supposed to be more resilient to oil than rubber so that's comforting to know while I procrastinate on replacing leaky valve covers. Missing link Made this from 1.5" x 1.5" 1/8" steel square tubing. 23 7/8" long. Ends chopped at 45 degrees. Couldn't feel any difference driving or wheeling. This later got modified for a skid plate a few months later. Skidplate. Had some trails at the offroad park that couldn't be finished because I lacked armor. After getting scammed on cheap rock sliders and Lokka taking 9 months to ship my part, my wife was very leery about me spending big bucks on car parts so I took matters into my own inexperienced hands to make my own skidplates. 3/16 thick 24x48 steel was "only" $96 so I started. I first modified the missing link by adding a 1" spacer from square tubing so the plate steel would clear the front diff. I measured and cut out the mid skid and made notches for the rear control arm bolts. I turned a lot of drill bits into smoke so drilling this took forever. I cut the front skid and notched it with an angle grinder. Apparently the plate steel had a wave to it and made it difficult to notch with the angle grinder without puncturing through the back side. Welded the creases and cleaned up the mill scale and welds after several hours Painted it with flat black rust converter for easy touch ups. Found some bolts at the hardware store. Got some washers for rocks to deflect off. Mounted it up. Just enough clearance between plate and diff Took it to the offroad park and hit the trails I had to turn around on last time. Got some scars to test it out. I think it's a winner. Whenever time allows, I'll see about making a rear skid. So that's a wrap on the build as it sits now.
    5 points
  7. Bulk update for the past weeks of "What did I do..." Truck's still apart, coming up on a month now, but it's pretty close to being back together. Maybe all done this weekend. Here's how things were looking... Transmission was nasty. I bought myself a pressure washer at some point and zapped this clean. I can't believe don't have a pic of the cleaned unit with the 4:1 case installed. I did do this, though... Maybe it'll make for a nice junkyard find one day! Cleaned out the underbelly! What a mess. Was loaded with Sedona red clay. You can't see it, but I also sheared a flex plate bolt at the 6 o'clock position. That sucked to extract. I had intentions to replace the RMS, but like many people have discovered, it's not the seal, but the stupid gasket strip of the seal bracket. After reading up on what all it actually entailed, I said screw it. Cleaned up the area and laid down some gasket maker all over it. Should be fine/I'll regret it some other day. I did pull down the lower oil pan to clean up all the oil build-up over the years. Everything's way cleaner now. Once I had the transmission attached, I changed out the motor mounts. Almost didn't because of how terrible access is on the passenger side, but I'm glad I did... Installed a transmission cooler... Ran into a snag with some crappy catalytic converters off ebay last weeked...they absolutely do not fit the truck. After numerous failed fitment attempts, I eventually built a jig with the OE assemblies and fitted the new stuff into the jig to see how bad was and maybe if it could be reworked...nope. It's terribly misaligned, practically every component of it. The amount of incompetency feels deliberate. OE units jigged up: New units on the jigs. Holy gaps/alignment/crap! Since the upper cats weren't marked L/R, I tried every combination and rotation possible. What you see is the "best" combination, and also the only one that was close to being feasible. At this point, I'm just planning to clean up the OE units and put them back on. I'm past the return date, so these are a loss likely. Not even worth the effort to rework; the catalytic honeycombs are probably crap anyway. The OE units are probably still fine, but this main overhaul was just to totally refresh everything, since I kept throwing a P0430 (catalytic converter efficiency) over the years. The upstream O2 sensors were the original sensors, and judging by their condition, it may be the real cause of the code. L to R: LH & RH upstream (both OE), LH & RH downstream (both aftermarket). I don't blame the previous owner for never changing them. They're such a pain. The heat shields alone probably added an hour to the job, because they block the sensor hex. I still need to get the cats and a new exhaust on...hopefully no surprises there. The other day I also realized that t-case shifter arm is different between an R50 and a WD22 Xterra, which is what my donor t-case came from. The Xterra arm is longer, which prevented shifting into 2H. Swapping the arms was a bit of a pain...the pins that hold the arm onto the shaft are wedged in place. Took penetrant, heat, and a hammer and punch to get it out. I was able to get them swapped tonight, so shifting operations are back to normal.
    4 points
  8. Finally have a couple of new updates. Installed front & mid skid plates as well as a missing link from SF Creation. I had the front plate, and missing link powder coated by Steve, but left the mid in raw aluminum. Also got a rear window molle panel that a guy who is local to me was fabricating and selling them in one of the Pathfinder Facebook groups. He sells them in raw aluminum, but I went ahead and painted them in rattle-can bed liner. Install was a bit of a pain, and made me wish I had an additional arm to hold the thing in place (he doesn't pre-drill the holes etc. so you have to mock it up etc.). Came out pretty good in the end though. I also got a gift certificate for Weather Tech for my birthday, and since I already have their mats and rear cargo liner I opted to try out their seat back protectors to gain some additional storage options. They are not cheap but as with all Weather Tech products they are made in the USA & are very high quality. They don't install the way that is intended on the seat bottom so I routed the straps underneath the brackets that bolt the seats to the floorboard, and it worked great.
    4 points
  9. I'm kind of tired of not seeing anything at night and I was planning on retrofitting some Morimoto projectors. While considering it, I was looking at Toyota's 70 Series LC anniversary edition and the relatively minor tweaks they did to the front end (blacking out headlights, grille, old school logo): I think it looks great without going overboard. I put my rusty Photoshop skills to good use and came up with this: The idea would be blacking out the headlight surrounds while retrofitting the projectors and getting a Patrol Y60 grille emblem (I think I oversized it above, should be smaller). There are some similar headlights already on eBay but they are both: A. Crap and B. They paint the turn signal reflector which is dumb. Yay? Nay? Not sure if I like it myself. Looks different alright but not sure if it fits the car.
    3 points
  10. Also had the engine torn down to change out the thermostats, gaskets on the rear water pipe, knock sensor, rebuild the fuel injectors, PCV, valve cover gaskets, etc. If you're going to rebuild them, get a kit with o-rings, pintle caps, and filters. Also get a filter removal tool; I was unable to remove a filter without one. Carb and choke cleaner with one of those pulse controllers off Amazon worked well to clean them, but it was a little on the messy side. And while not a Pathfinder, I tore down my Frontier on Sunday and got it to the body and paint shop. Time to bring it back to life! These pics are of the "good" side. The hood, roof, and passenger bedside are really bad. Paint shop will also do a spray-in bedliner (had a drop-in). Should have it back in a month, then will put new windshields, lenses, and rear bumper on. Btw, driving it without windshields is a blast. Driving without mirrors...not so much.
    3 points
  11. Pulled the transmission and t-case down tonight. Part of an overhaul on the truck that started on Saturday. Valve covers and up, fuel injector service, new plugs, main seal, coolant system (including rear crossover pipe and stuff). Also swapping in a 4:1 t-case and changing the motor mounts. Dangerously close to proceeding with the SAS at this point…
    3 points
  12. Coastal Offroad makes a weld it yourself kit that I believe is winch ready - https://www.coastaloffroad.com/product-category/1996-2004-pathfinder/ Other popular option would be ARB
    3 points
  13. This smells like some Facebook bull@!*%. Don’t bring that @!*% here.
    3 points
  14. Truthfully, 90-95% of Pathfinder owners are not the target market. That’s the reason why there isn’t a market for stuff like this. Most Pathfinder/Nissan owners would own a Toyota or Jeep if they could afford it. Very few people are actual Nissan fans and simply buy because they’re cheap or couldn’t find something else. Buying roof rack that is 1/4 of the value of a car may not even be a smart decision in the long run. Still, I’m sure the amount of work OP has put in was exhaustive.
    3 points
  15. You're not wrong, it is a lot of money, but this isn't an amazon Curt rack. OP spent a lot of time for R&D. It's a nice rack for a market that doesn't exist for the R50. I know you were not trying to be a jerk but consider the work that goes into something like this before commenting... or at least ask why the cost. Do you also make these tents?
    3 points
  16. Well, okay so first of all it's made in Canada, designed from scratch by myself, CNC cut from 1/4" aluminium and powder coated locally. Now if you think it should be cheaper, I will surprise you, my cost per rack is pretty close to 80% of the price I'm selling it for. Aluminium prices have been high recently, labour is not cheap in BC, I'm not skimping and use stainless steel high quality hardware, I took 4 prototypes to get it exactly how I wanted it and make a good fit. It comes with custom made brackets, an installation manual and is designed to fit all R50 roof rails as it's a simple bolt on style rack. I won't even start on tents, the one you're seeing in the picture Im selling for $2900CAD and guess what, I do sell them at this price fairly easy. Unfortunately there are no alternatives to roof racks for R50s and so I took my after work free time, spent it in front of the computer and taking tons of measurments, designed it and built it. If I added my hourly rate to the cost, it would've been more but since it's my side fun project I cam out with the price most people agreed was fair and all customers so far have been happy with the racks and the quality. These things are not cheap but I guarantee they will outlast all R50s out there and will not break, rust or fall apart. I also have some discounted racks with minor imperfections but since I really don't appreciate your tone and stereotypical jokes, I'll ask you to move on and search for alternatives. And since I know there are no alternatives really, good luck building your own ?
    3 points
  17. Here are some photos of happy customers. I still have two full rack and two discounted sets (very very minor imperfections). Shipping available anywhere in Canada or the US.
    3 points
  18. Well it looks like my old build thread got nuked as it was made in the "lost period".... so here's a new one! The last one was "maybe" going to be a build thread, so this one's the "confirmed" build thread! I'll begin with a brief review of the old thread and a few updates from the fall to bring us to today. This is my first "project" vehicle and more or less is my entire journey from knowing very little about working on cars to wherever I end up. I picked up my 2003 Pathfinder LE in June 2021 with 242,000k on the odometer. The vehicle was in good shape with some relatively minor rust in the usual spots, but none in the strut towers which is great. I believe I am the third owner and the vehicle has spent the majority of its life in the interior of British Columbia - so limited rust, but not much. Here she is the day I picked her up: Here's what the Pathfinder replaced, with the Pathfinder lurking in the background the same night I brought it home: Biggest disadvantage of the pathfinder so far? No dash spot for Lenore on long trips. She's tried to do this a few times on the Pathfinder's dash but she always falls off. Oh well, safety first kitty! The very first thing I did upon getting it home was address the power valve screws and a few other things. Upon the advice of some of our wise members, I did more or less every gasket above the valve cover gaskets (including those), the rear thermostat, the rear thermostat elbow hose, PCV valve, and of course the power valve screws. I didn't replace every vacuum line and crankcase breather hose as I had trouble finding the breather hoses locally. This was a mistake, as it turns out. The previous owner stated he had just done spark plugs, and they looked quite good. This is almost as deep as I got: Upon starting the car, it sounded terrible and the SES light immediately came on: vacuum leak. I tried a few times to diagnose the issue without pulling the everything I'd just done apart, but to no avail. I ended up re-doing most of my work as the line that had cracked was the one that ran underneath the lower intake plenum: basically back where I'd started! I got that sorted and did a coolant flush. This is the first time it ran properly after my work: Admiring it from the garage in the rain: After that I insured it for two months to drive it around in its stock form to do a bit of a shakedown to see if anything major would pop up before putting my lift in. It's a great vehicle to get me to the bike park and back! Here it is during that time: After being satisfied with my time with it during the shake down, I committed to lifting the vehicle. I went for OME HD front on KYB struts and LR 9447s out back with OME shocks. Unfortunately the shop I ordered the shocks from sent me the wrong ones, clearly for a 96-99. They returned them at their expense and I got new KYB shocks out back for now. If I get an SFD or similar in the future, I'll revisit the rear shocks and stick something else in there. I also added a front SFcreations skid plate and missing link to the vehicle, did a reasonable amount of rust removal/repair on the rear quarterpanels, a new exhaust, and probably some other minor things I'm forgetting about now. I did recently check the RMS as I thought it was starting to leak, but it turned out to be a stupid little crush washer in a plug above it that had just started to leak. The RMS itself looked great with non-factory RTV that looked pretty fresh in the area - so at some point, someone else had to deal with it. I need to get photos of the Pathfinder with its little lift in AND the decent tires - right now it is on small little winters that don't look particularly good. For now, I have the following things to attend to over this season at a minimum: Replace front right strut + bearing - the non-OEM strut bearing broke within 500km of replacing it, it's taken the strut with it too - right now it clicks as it rotates. I have the stuff and just need to chuck it in when I get a chance. I'd love to repack the rear LSD before the end of the season. Driving the vehicle around this winter has revealed it's quite worn out. I have a possible front diff issue I'll need to look in to at some point: occasionally, the vehicle will not engage the front right CV when shifted in to AWD/4wd mode. It engages and the light turns on within a few seconds of travel, however, but is unable to do so at a stop if the issue occurs. I've already checked the CV and the diff and transfer case fluids. This might require a deeper dive at some point. The rear bump stops are non-existent. I've ordered a replacement set and I'll have to chuck them in at some point. I'd like to touch up the paint work I did on the rear quarter panels - the fade is far below my standards and worse than I know I'm capable of. I'll probably take the time to do some touch ups elsewhere, but it'll be tough to fade small areas as the paint code paint is MUCH darker than what my vehicle has faded to over the past 19 years. Maybe I'll see if I can get a closer match to the real colour somewhere. Looking beyond the "I'd like to do it this year" stuff, at some point I'd like to replace all the hoses and vac lines under the hood. Ain't broke, don't fix right now, and I have no reason to go in there at the moment, so I'll leave it for now. I'd like to install a transmission cooler and in-line filter. The stupid rear bumper is drooping a bit - I've reattached all of the fittings, so I don't really know what's happening here. I'd like to take care of that after I do some paint work. Oh, and the front bumper on the right (is there a theme here) is missing a fitting, so I should probably find one for that too. Beyond that? Who knows. I have dreams of a "fully built" pathfinder, but I'm not 100% sure this one is it. I wouldn't mind spending the money on a low KM, lower mainland/Vancouver Island example to do the "dream" build. There have been several come up in the past month or so, but I'm not really ready to spend 8-10K CAD on one when I'm really not convinced they'll keep their inflated value over the next 1.5 years. Until then, I'll keep doing maintenance and either cost-effective or somewhat transferrable mods should I move to another vehicle.
    3 points
  19. Two import things to know with the front suspension. Also, fix your Power Valves if you haven’t already
    3 points
  20. Greetings. Tried multiple times (months ago) to join the forum. Could never receive confirmation email and no replies from "contact us". Figured it was a server deal somewhere in the world. Retired from federal govt. Purchased '87 Pathfinder several months ago. Not exactly what I was looking for to replace my '89 Trooper but I'm good with it now. Has an A/T which I'm slowly accepting. Aside from a very cracked dash and broken speedo, it's very clean. Runs great though it needs some TLC. I'm slowly repairing, replacing, etc this and that. The previous owner converted to a Weber 38/38. I'm ok with that though it has an idle issue with both high-speed and fully warm. I believe the air/fuel screws are a good starting point. As stated however, it runs perfectly when on the road. Acts like a vacuum leak but I find none above the block. Just ordered some "funky" (cheap) 31x10.50R15 M/T and very basic (GM-style) 7" silver wheels to replace those tiny 5.5s. Probably be adding manual hubs soon. Other than the height difference, per Google, the dimensions are very close to my '89 4-door Trooper. That really surprised me. Seems much smaller. Had other pics to share but it appears to be a 150kB limit per post. Anyhow, glad to be here.
    2 points
  21. Throwback pic, to May 2018. If anybody has a dirt cheap WD21 around Michigan I can turn into a trail rig I'm your sucker, I miss having stuff to post on this forum!
    2 points
  22. I would just start with tires. Until you take it out and use it for exactly what you want to do, it may be hard to know exactly what you want to change 1. Use the vehicle 2. Take not of issues or inconveniences 3. Modify as needed If you know you're gonna go camping, you'll probably want a nice set of All-Terrain (not all season) tires. You can make your way up almost any forest service road on highway tires, but in emergency weather or certain situations you'll want some better tread. Go for a snow rated all-terrain. If, from there, you notice deficiencies in the suspension, address them. But, as you add more modifications you will run into areas where you may have to compromise or do additional supporting mods/maintenance. The less you add, the easier the vehicle is to drive and maintain normally. You can start with the stock wheels and a tire that measures out between 29" (stock) and about 30.5" tall and you shouldn't have any issues with rubbing. I use tiresize.com to compare tire sizes. If you're towing and need help with that weight, you might get load helper/air helper bags or go with a stiffer rear spring from old man emu, ironman4x4, etc. If you go with new springs, or with the land rover springs , you may need to lift the front with a spring to get closer to level. Here's some front coil options Manual hubs are nice for people running lift or heavier tires, and can easily be installed yourself I do not recommend lift spacers on the front or the rear suspension. It's an inferior option. Skip the brush gaurds. They're a damage multiplier imo and they usually eat into your approach and departure angles. Steel wheels are not a bad option at all. If you want to go with really tall tires (taller than 31"), look for a wheel with 3.75 backspacing. This helps push the tire away from rubbing up against the lower strut/spring perch. Tall tires at that backspacing will require trimming in almost every case. Again, I would start with just the tires. You'd be very surprised how far you can get on just a stock vehicle and some forest service roads
    2 points
  23. Thanks. Yep, basic 3-speed a/t. Seems very good. Currently have the new tires and wheels be mated and balanced. Pick them up in a day or two. On my 89 Trooper, I converted it myself to a Weber 32/36. Had zero knowledge of carbs other than having put a kit in a chainsaw, 2-cycle, etc before. I googled forever and a day trying to get the Weber right. It did fine but had a dieseling issue. Ultimately, I hooked up with Bud Pauge. He ran / runs Weber /Redline USA. What a fantastic and knowledgeable guy. Aside from suit and tie, he races sports cars, 4x4 enthusiast, the whole deal. I still have all the emails where he helped me set up that carb. We absolutely nailed it with a jet change, resetting float, needle, etc. Of course I had no idea what I was doing but I am pretty good at following instructions. Did it all in my living room. Waited for him to eventually tell me to pound sand but it never happened. Keep in mind this is a very busy individual. Wil be forever grateful to that man. Ultimately, I posted a decent tutorial of the conversion process in a couple of Isuzu forums. I have a factory manual which I hate to say, is the biggest pos I have ever used. Even the little Haynes manual is more useful. I probably in for the long haul. Regarding pics, I use Imgur for hosting. I just thought there was a tiny size limit for posting pics. I'll post one and see if it's allowed. Thanks again. That worked.
    2 points
  24. I love the VG engines man, absolute tanks. Last year I drove my VG Qx4 from San Jose, CA to Greenville, SC over the course of 5 days. She was loaded to the roof from the front seats to the trunk, fully packed out. Squatted pretty good lol. Stopped in Moab and did the White Rim trail in Canyonlands national park, 100 miles off-road over 2 days of the trip. She was fully loaded and did some pretty challenging sections without serious trouble and with 0 problems in 100+ degree weather. What else can you say about these vehicles man? Just amazingly capable and tanky!
    2 points
  25. Any similar tool will do...tons of options on Amazon still varying from $30 and up. Seeing a Beetro 14" unit that's at the low price range and has the essential metric sizes. Most kits come with both SAE and metric sizes, which is a plus if you have other uses. Mine still sees occasional use so I'm keeping it around.
    2 points
  26. Hi Folks, New member from the Central Coast in California. Here to absorb knowledge and share my daily. Specs: 2003 Pathfinder LE Auto Transfer Case & Transmission Front Lift: AC 2in lift coils, KYB extended Struts Rear Lift: NRC9449 Springs, Bilstein 5100 extended Shocks Wheels: U.S. Wheels Series 304, 15x8, -19 offset, 3.75 backspacing Tires: Falken Wildpeak AT3, 31x10.5 Instagram: Robertiko_138 My other car is: 1989 Volvo 240, dropped on BNE Dynamics coilovers Next Mods: Underbody Protection, Front Locker, Rear LSD, Sliders Images are from recent trip to Anza Borrego State Park
    2 points
  27. Thanks so much for your thoughts! I did have a small coolant leak in the thermo element of the throttle body. That seems to be a relatively common issue. Not sure if that would be a big enough deal to cause overheating under heavy load -- I wasn't losing much coolant -- but perhaps it impacted the pressure in the system. I've replaced the oring and sealed everything with RTV. (Great how-to here: https://www.clubxterra.org/threads/thermo-element-idle-sensor-rebuild.38432/). Would have replaced the whole thermo element, but that part is shockingly expensive. Hopefully that will solve the coolant issue. The fluid itself is still very new, as is the water pump and thermostat. Regarding the low power frustration -- I'm glad to hear that this is probably just a result of the engine being underpowered and the transmission being frustrating. Next time I'll try turning off overdrive and just being willing to run at a higher rpm for more power. Maybe that will also help the fan run a bit faster, and higher speed will help airflow over the radiator as well. I'll post an update and let y'all know how it goes!
    2 points
  28. This setup should serve you well! Cool to see you got it all put together. Props to lokka on the 5 month shipping... lol. I think another lokka writeup would be great to have - there's so many details and moving parts, especially if you're coming into this as a novice mechanic.
    2 points
  29. Looks great! I somehow get trail rub in the rear that caused me to break some of the fender flare clips with 31X10.5 tires, 3.75" backspacing, and 33-185552 Bilstien 2" extended shocks... I'll be interested in seeing what solution you come up with.
    2 points
  30. Build update! Man, it takes forever to get upgrades on this thing. The 31.6" General Grabber AT2 tires were about 8 years old, getting close to the wear bars, cracked, chunked and starting to leak. While I recommend Grabber all terrains, I wanted to change things up so I went with the Milestar Patagonia MT. Went up a size 33"x11.5" (285 75r 16) Front tire fitment Driving home from the tire shop required a 7 point turn to get out to the street and then I had to route home using left turns so I could swing wider due to severe rubbing. It did successfully clear the strut with my 4.0 backspacing wheels. I had to cut over an inch of the front bumper and up to an inch on the fender to get it to become driveable. It still rubs, so there's more trimming to be done. With this particular setup, the passenger tire rubs the sheet metal shield that protects the brake lines in the passenger wheel well at full lock. I'm going to have to keep and eye on the guard and be prepared to step in with some new ideas if it starts to let go. Rear tire fitment: Rear tires fit great for city driving. They will even tuck during some urban flex testing, but the trail fitment is another story. First wheeling trip started snapping fender flare clips after some immediate unavoidable hard rubbing. It appears to rub and pull the flare from in from of the tire... or maybe it's on the back side by the mudflap? It's not hitting the upper portion though. It ultimately caused me to lose a flare on the trail. So I'm debating either going flareless or finding some black flares from salvage since finding bronzed gray colored pathfinders is impossible. Tire performance The Patagonia MT's have a center strip of tight knight lugs that provide a smooth quiet contact patch. Since the tires are rated for a stupid amount of air pressure, I filled them up to 40 psi (checked a couple months later and found 45 psi?) and sure enough, they are no louder than the bald all terrains that I just tossed out. You can hear the side lugs contacting asphalt with their typical MT growl if you corner or brake hard enough to squish the side walls, but typical cruising is silent. One thing I noticed is that at high psi, the agility for quick turns or swerves is very poor. Feels like you're trying to corner with marshmallow tires. At lower psi, it's slightly improved, but more noise is present as your contact patch includes more side lugs. Wet weather performance is good. Trail performance is good thus far, however I haven't tested these at low pressure yet. At 40+ psi, I did a few miles on rocks, dirt and mud and had no issues finding traction, likely due to new/deep tread and expections set to the previous tire set's performance. Second trail run, I had them at 30 psi and found that 30 psi wasn't quite wanting to grab and hold the rock ledges that I wanted to climb, but other than that, they performed as expected. One thing to note is that every other lug will pick up gravel about every stinkin' tire rotation so keep that in mind if you have cars with expensive windshields driving behind you.
    2 points
  31. My vq leaks considerably less and runs quieter with Rotella T4 15w40 for what that's worth. Valve cover gasket shouldn't affect oil pressure, the oil is just gravity draining back to the pan at that point. If its not smoking and your not constantly smelling burning oil I wouldn't worry about it on the trip. Always a good idea to have a fire extinguisher in the vehicle though! Lol
    2 points
  32. Auto or manual? If it's auto, and it's shifting normally, that would suggest the trans computer knows what's going on even if the engine computer and gauge did not, which might help narrow it down. If it's manual, well, there's that theory shot. And, yeah, go get the '97 manual from Nicoclub. Should be some troubleshooting or at least a circuit diagram in the EL section. There's a lot of hand-holding for using the special dealer Consult tool, but there's usually an alternate method for the rest of us. If the sensor is good (and so is the gear that drives it), and both the cluster and the computer say they're not seeing anything, that would have me looking for a wiring fault in between them.
    2 points
  33. I wouldn't recommend doing them yourself without a hydraulic press. I've done a few now and they all required a press. The different snap rings are used to center the u joint but mine always took the same size that was on there (usually the skinniest). Spicer u joints should include the 3 different size rings. Spicer is the only brand I'll use for u joints. On my rear drive shaft I used machinist calipers to center the u joints and it worked great with no vibrations (till I snapped my upper control arms and the yokes got bent ?). I have a lokka and manual hubs in front so didn't really worry about centering the u joints in front since the hubs are never locked over 25mph. It's pretty straight forward but getting them centered and not messing anything up makes it tedious and a bit of a pain in the ass. If you're not comfortable doing it yourself I would take it to a specialist driveline shop, the average mechanic will not have done many (if any) of these.
    2 points
  34. I'm not normally a fan of painting headlights, but IMO that look suits it. Breaks up some of that chromed plastic where it's not doing anything. Not sure about the grille. I replaced the emblem on mine with a rubber rat's head, though, so maybe I'm not the guy to talk to about tasteful grille mods.
    2 points
  35. Unless the joints are so flogged that they've eaten into the yokes, or the driveshaft has obvious dents/chowder marks/slop in the slip joint, I would just throw a set of joints at it and see where that gets you. Check your front diff bushings while you're in there, I remember someone on here had a vibration that came down to the diff flopping around under load and putting the joint at weird angles.
    2 points
  36. Update. I got the car running. I was able to Get my dad to come out and help me find TDC because the markings on the crank pulley were incorrect. Once it was at TDC i oriented the rotor to point to the #1 wire. Put it back together and it started running!
    2 points
  37. Disregard. I found it. This forum is not helpful at all.
    2 points
  38. I’ve bought a couple of things from Fleury and he makes good quality stuff. His missing link is robust.
    2 points
  39. Good points, I agree as to the cost factor. Problem is it can't be cheaper if I make a few of them only. It would be cheaper in mass production obviously but like you said there's no need for that. My 15 racks are almost gone now and my next batch will be 5 likely. With aluminum and labor cost being historically high and all covid issues, my profit margin on these has shrunk down to be enough to pay for gas money and my rack really. I just took it as an after work fun project and make an alternative to very limited options. My original plan was to get a few of the rhino rack crossbars for my rooftop tent but if I wanted 4, it would cost me roughly $1000CAD so I figured I build my own. There, for another $500 you get 8 crossbars, wind fairing, 100% rust resistance, more attachment options and lower profile while supporting a couple small businesses. Anyways, I'm hoping to keep a few in stock for those who decide to get them, might even spend some time on improvements for 2nd batch, I'll update here! Also, a lot of people asked me to make one for 2nd gen Xterra, that might be a slightly bigger market maybe. Side note, I was going to do skid plates too locally to not have people pay for shipping but aluminum sheets prices made it not worth it, SFCreation shipped is pretty much the same money now so I'll just grab one of his and support his R&D.
    2 points
  40. I, too, would like to know which brand of spring you used in the rear that sagged so quickly. I am going to buy springs soon and want to avoid what you used.
    2 points
  41. Turns out I shot way more footage than I thought I did. Also turns out I mumble, but I knew that. Anyway, here's what I did on mine.
    2 points
  42. Here are some brackets that bolt to the block, one houses the starter, another mounts to the alternator, the 2 pieces on top of the engine mounts, blended out all the nasty spots, sandblasted and Powdercoated, the hardware has been stripped of whatever nickel plating was left and a ceramic coating applied. Also did the transmission support and some pulleys oh and a power steering rod. You know me by now guys paint it blue and call it new! The blending of welds and casting splatter on those cast metal pieces was painful, hard work pays off!
    2 points
  43. Some supporting pics... Sliders aren't attached here, just resting on jacks before I changed the mounts, but you can see how badly they jammed up into the pinch seam and rocker panel. Front leg: Rear leg: There's just nothing to prevent them from shifting upward except the pinch seam. How it sits today with my QX4 mounts, but you can see the lack of a gap at the door corner and further back. Doesn't hinder the door, though, but does rub just enough. The slider bodies are stout enough, though. No complaints there; just the mounting style I disliked. Shot of reinforced OE mounts and trail abuse since (my muffler has taken a beating): Here's basically how I had converted OE step rail mounts for use on mine and R50JR's sliders. I really liked the results. Just chopped off the legs and cut side plates to stiffen them up.
    2 points
  44. For a sec I thought that 4runner was your pathfinder. Looks like a fun snow day Sent from my Pathfinder
    2 points

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