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Due to a hardware failure on the hosts systems, all posts and messages created between May 26th and Jan 13th have been lost. Additionally, if you joined the NPORA Forums community during that time, you'll need to re-register. -NPORA Mod Team *Updated: 05/19/2022 12:15AM PST

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  1. R33 GTST brake calipers Unfortunately these use smaller 19mm bolts and would either need the following to run safely: - sleeves through the knuckle, or - re-thread/tap? the calipers to fit the bigger 22mm bolts.
    5 points
  2. Well it appears we lost almost a year of posts here so I thought I'd repost some of what I had done in that time just in case any of it will be helpful to anyone in the future. U-Bolts for mounting X-Bull type traction boards to the SE Roof Rack. I added adhesive felt to the top, and shrink wrap to the bottom to help protect the rack: Installed Midland MXT275 mobile GMRS radio installed in upper-portion of the center console with supplied antenna on the roof (excuse all the dog hair in these shots): Short antenna from cravenspeed.com. I was tired of the huge factory antenna getting hung up on branches of narrow trails. This is listed on their site as a Nissan Frontier part but works great: And some beauty shots C/O @PathyDude17 & @zakzackzachary & myself, as well as a video walkaround on Tyler's channel: Up next is a set of skid plates & missing link that is on order from SF Creation...
    5 points
  3. Well since the host of the site had a failure a few days ago, I'll go ahead and toss in a recap to the build from May 2021 to present since some of my build posts are gone. 2001 SE Grille: Kind of a rare find since the Bronzed Gray paint only existed in 2001 and 2002. Found it listed in a local part out. Sadly the part out had worse paint on the hood and fenders than mine but I digress. Powerstop z36 front brake kit. Local guy had a wrecked R50 that I was buying parts from. He had these new in box and wanted me to take/buy them. I didn't need brakes so I was like "uh, I can do $20" and he handed them over. For daily driving and wheeling they don't feel any different than my stock discs and pads but whatevs. Poly steering rack bushings form 4x4parts.com I rebuilt the front end with new cv axles, inner+outer tie rods, ball joints, inner+outer bearings, and rack bushings trying to find a popping noise that ended up being a control arm bushing. They don't appear to drive or feel special but I think polyurethane is supposed to be more resilient to oil than rubber so that's comforting to know while I procrastinate on replacing leaky valve covers. Missing link Made this from 1.5" x 1.5" 1/8" steel square tubing. 23 7/8" long. Ends chopped at 45 degrees. Couldn't feel any difference driving or wheeling. This later got modified for a skid plate a few months later. Skidplate. Had some trails at the offroad park that couldn't be finished because I lacked armor. After getting scammed on cheap rock sliders and Lokka taking 9 months to ship my part, my wife was very leery about me spending big bucks on car parts so I took matters into my own inexperienced hands to make my own skidplates. 3/16 thick 24x48 steel was "only" $96 so I started. I first modified the missing link by adding a 1" spacer from square tubing so the plate steel would clear the front diff. I measured and cut out the mid skid and made notches for the rear control arm bolts. I turned a lot of drill bits into smoke so drilling this took forever. I cut the front skid and notched it with an angle grinder. Apparently the plate steel had a wave to it and made it difficult to notch with the angle grinder without puncturing through the back side. Welded the creases and cleaned up the mill scale and welds after several hours Painted it with flat black rust converter for easy touch ups. Found some bolts at the hardware store. Got some washers for rocks to deflect off. Mounted it up. Just enough clearance between plate and diff Took it to the offroad park and hit the trails I had to turn around on last time. Got some scars to test it out. I think it's a winner. Whenever time allows, I'll see about making a rear skid. So that's a wrap on the build as it sits now.
    5 points
  4. Hey R50 people! You might have seen my posts on Facebook groups or instagram, but I also wanted to be present here as I've enjoyed browsing this forum numbers of time. Those of you who don't know me, I'm based in Vancouver BC Canada and I created a sweet roof rack for all R50 models. I was inspired by Prinsu obviously and since there are no aftermarket solutions for R50 I decided to make my own rack. Please check out some details, information, manual and more photos at my google drive: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/14yxt2aZX2_KDKsw74M9Ft5XpMms7hF-H?usp=sharing Let me know if you have any questions! I've sold a few already so you might start seeing those racks on R50s! Thanks! Pawel
    4 points
  5. Finally have a couple of new updates. Installed front & mid skid plates as well as a missing link from SF Creation. I had the front plate, and missing link powder coated by Steve, but left the mid in raw aluminum. Also got a rear window molle panel that a guy who is local to me was fabricating and selling them in one of the Pathfinder Facebook groups. He sells them in raw aluminum, but I went ahead and painted them in rattle-can bed liner. Install was a bit of a pain, and made me wish I had an additional arm to hold the thing in place (he doesn't pre-drill the holes etc. so you have to mock it up etc.). Came out pretty good in the end though. I also got a gift certificate for Weather Tech for my birthday, and since I already have their mats and rear cargo liner I opted to try out their seat back protectors to gain some additional storage options. They are not cheap but as with all Weather Tech products they are made in the USA & are very high quality. They don't install the way that is intended on the seat bottom so I routed the straps underneath the brackets that bolt the seats to the floorboard, and it worked great.
    4 points
  6. Coastal Offroad makes a weld it yourself kit that I believe is winch ready - https://www.coastaloffroad.com/product-category/1996-2004-pathfinder/ Other popular option would be ARB
    3 points
  7. This smells like some Facebook bull@!*%. Don’t bring that @!*% here.
    3 points
  8. You're not wrong, it is a lot of money, but this isn't an amazon Curt rack. OP spent a lot of time for R&D. It's a nice rack for a market that doesn't exist for the R50. I know you were not trying to be a jerk but consider the work that goes into something like this before commenting... or at least ask why the cost. Do you also make these tents?
    3 points
  9. Well, okay so first of all it's made in Canada, designed from scratch by myself, CNC cut from 1/4" aluminium and powder coated locally. Now if you think it should be cheaper, I will surprise you, my cost per rack is pretty close to 80% of the price I'm selling it for. Aluminium prices have been high recently, labour is not cheap in BC, I'm not skimping and use stainless steel high quality hardware, I took 4 prototypes to get it exactly how I wanted it and make a good fit. It comes with custom made brackets, an installation manual and is designed to fit all R50 roof rails as it's a simple bolt on style rack. I won't even start on tents, the one you're seeing in the picture Im selling for $2900CAD and guess what, I do sell them at this price fairly easy. Unfortunately there are no alternatives to roof racks for R50s and so I took my after work free time, spent it in front of the computer and taking tons of measurments, designed it and built it. If I added my hourly rate to the cost, it would've been more but since it's my side fun project I cam out with the price most people agreed was fair and all customers so far have been happy with the racks and the quality. These things are not cheap but I guarantee they will outlast all R50s out there and will not break, rust or fall apart. I also have some discounted racks with minor imperfections but since I really don't appreciate your tone and stereotypical jokes, I'll ask you to move on and search for alternatives. And since I know there are no alternatives really, good luck building your own
    3 points
  10. Here are some photos of happy customers. I still have two full rack and two discounted sets (very very minor imperfections). Shipping available anywhere in Canada or the US.
    3 points
  11. Well it looks like my old build thread got nuked as it was made in the "lost period".... so here's a new one! The last one was "maybe" going to be a build thread, so this one's the "confirmed" build thread! I'll begin with a brief review of the old thread and a few updates from the fall to bring us to today. This is my first "project" vehicle and more or less is my entire journey from knowing very little about working on cars to wherever I end up. I picked up my 2003 Pathfinder LE in June 2021 with 242,000k on the odometer. The vehicle was in good shape with some relatively minor rust in the usual spots, but none in the strut towers which is great. I believe I am the third owner and the vehicle has spent the majority of its life in the interior of British Columbia - so limited rust, but not much. Here she is the day I picked her up: Here's what the Pathfinder replaced, with the Pathfinder lurking in the background the same night I brought it home: Biggest disadvantage of the pathfinder so far? No dash spot for Lenore on long trips. She's tried to do this a few times on the Pathfinder's dash but she always falls off. Oh well, safety first kitty! The very first thing I did upon getting it home was address the power valve screws and a few other things. Upon the advice of some of our wise members, I did more or less every gasket above the valve cover gaskets (including those), the rear thermostat, the rear thermostat elbow hose, PCV valve, and of course the power valve screws. I didn't replace every vacuum line and crankcase breather hose as I had trouble finding the breather hoses locally. This was a mistake, as it turns out. The previous owner stated he had just done spark plugs, and they looked quite good. This is almost as deep as I got: Upon starting the car, it sounded terrible and the SES light immediately came on: vacuum leak. I tried a few times to diagnose the issue without pulling the everything I'd just done apart, but to no avail. I ended up re-doing most of my work as the line that had cracked was the one that ran underneath the lower intake plenum: basically back where I'd started! I got that sorted and did a coolant flush. This is the first time it ran properly after my work: Admiring it from the garage in the rain: After that I insured it for two months to drive it around in its stock form to do a bit of a shakedown to see if anything major would pop up before putting my lift in. It's a great vehicle to get me to the bike park and back! Here it is during that time: After being satisfied with my time with it during the shake down, I committed to lifting the vehicle. I went for OME HD front on KYB struts and LR 9447s out back with OME shocks. Unfortunately the shop I ordered the shocks from sent me the wrong ones, clearly for a 96-99. They returned them at their expense and I got new KYB shocks out back for now. If I get an SFD or similar in the future, I'll revisit the rear shocks and stick something else in there. I also added a front SFcreations skid plate and missing link to the vehicle, did a reasonable amount of rust removal/repair on the rear quarterpanels, a new exhaust, and probably some other minor things I'm forgetting about now. I did recently check the RMS as I thought it was starting to leak, but it turned out to be a stupid little crush washer in a plug above it that had just started to leak. The RMS itself looked great with non-factory RTV that looked pretty fresh in the area - so at some point, someone else had to deal with it. I need to get photos of the Pathfinder with its little lift in AND the decent tires - right now it is on small little winters that don't look particularly good. For now, I have the following things to attend to over this season at a minimum: Replace front right strut + bearing - the non-OEM strut bearing broke within 500km of replacing it, it's taken the strut with it too - right now it clicks as it rotates. I have the stuff and just need to chuck it in when I get a chance. I'd love to repack the rear LSD before the end of the season. Driving the vehicle around this winter has revealed it's quite worn out. I have a possible front diff issue I'll need to look in to at some point: occasionally, the vehicle will not engage the front right CV when shifted in to AWD/4wd mode. It engages and the light turns on within a few seconds of travel, however, but is unable to do so at a stop if the issue occurs. I've already checked the CV and the diff and transfer case fluids. This might require a deeper dive at some point. The rear bump stops are non-existent. I've ordered a replacement set and I'll have to chuck them in at some point. I'd like to touch up the paint work I did on the rear quarter panels - the fade is far below my standards and worse than I know I'm capable of. I'll probably take the time to do some touch ups elsewhere, but it'll be tough to fade small areas as the paint code paint is MUCH darker than what my vehicle has faded to over the past 19 years. Maybe I'll see if I can get a closer match to the real colour somewhere. Looking beyond the "I'd like to do it this year" stuff, at some point I'd like to replace all the hoses and vac lines under the hood. Ain't broke, don't fix right now, and I have no reason to go in there at the moment, so I'll leave it for now. I'd like to install a transmission cooler and in-line filter. The stupid rear bumper is drooping a bit - I've reattached all of the fittings, so I don't really know what's happening here. I'd like to take care of that after I do some paint work. Oh, and the front bumper on the right (is there a theme here) is missing a fitting, so I should probably find one for that too. Beyond that? Who knows. I have dreams of a "fully built" pathfinder, but I'm not 100% sure this one is it. I wouldn't mind spending the money on a low KM, lower mainland/Vancouver Island example to do the "dream" build. There have been several come up in the past month or so, but I'm not really ready to spend 8-10K CAD on one when I'm really not convinced they'll keep their inflated value over the next 1.5 years. Until then, I'll keep doing maintenance and either cost-effective or somewhat transferrable mods should I move to another vehicle.
    3 points
  12. Two import things to know with the front suspension. Also, fix your Power Valves if you haven’t already
    3 points
  13. Down here in Tassie we call it the "Covid Tax" old $2-$4k Landcruisers and Patrols down here now go for anywhere between $8k to $16k, it is stupid. Even caravans, and in particular off road campers are going through the roof too, we got ours delivered leading into covid for mid $20k and they are now selling $40-$50k second hand because the waiting times on new ones are up to and over 18 months. All because everyone can't go on interstate/international holidays any more they are buying up all the 4x4's ad campers so they can see their home state, and camp etc... I'm calling it, there will be a glut of 4x4's and off road campers on the market in the next 18-36 months, back at realistic if not rock bottom prices.
    3 points
  14. This is kinda the crux of it. It's his shtick. I used to watch them back in the day, but for me it got a little tiring and watching the latest R50 video reminded me of that. Tyler did a little rebuttal video that addresses some of the RCR points, I found it entertaining and good. I like that it exists just as a counter for anyone who runs across the RCR video and has differing opinions.
    3 points
  15. Wow it’s been some time! I was browsing the r50 section to see what might be new and I figured I might as well throw up an update in case anyone cares. The truck is now at 320,000 miles, still going strong. Worst thing to happen since my last update was an small evap leak, everything else works like new. I’ve got a code for the swirl control system but haven’t been able to track it down yet. Doesn't affect drivability as far as I can tell, so it’s likely one of the million parameters involved in its operation is slightly out of spec for what the system is looking to see. I’ve tested the valve itself and the vacuum lines around it, no issues. Eventually Ill need to sort it out so I can pass emissions, but whatever it’s on the back burner for now. There’s a slight weep from the rear diff, most likely the pinion seal. I need to do the rear wheel bearings, drums, and axle seals all together so I’m planning it for some time over the summer. My girlfriends 4runner needs that same treatment but a little more desperately since her drums are soaked in gear oil so it takes priority over mine at the moment. My engine still leaks oil like crazy, no matter which stop leak I use. I gave up at some point and now I just run maxlife blend 10w-40 which seems to keep it under control better than the mobile 1 did. If I’m driving it a lot every day I go through about a quart per week, but luckily I’m working from home these days so I can keep the oil consumption to a minimum. I also changed the radiator and hoses, along with the two front cam position sensors and fan+clutch as preventative maintenance. Got the front shaft U-joints swapped out and balanced by a driveline shop so there’s no more rumbling on the highway. In the late fall my dad and I took the two pathfinders out to the Logandale trail network outside of Vegas to blast through the sandy canyons a bit. Super fun spot, but my skinny tires were a little bit out of their comfort zone in some of the really deep sand. Especially because the tread depth is getting pretty low. I’ve had the tires since March 2020 I think? So probably 35K miles at least, with about 6-10 months of usable tread left at this rate. My JEGS jerry can go stolen from the back of the truck over the winter. Some bastard cut the ratchet strap while it was parked. People are getting desperate with the gas prices being the way they are. So when I replaced the can I also built in a simple swing open locking mechanism to keep casual thieves from trying. It’s not impenetrable obviously, but so far no one has messed with it. I also got a nice set of seat covers so I don’t have to look at the ugly cuts and tears in my seats anymore. I think they look great now A few weeks ago I welded up some basic low profile rock sliders to help deflect the odd boulder that might want to smack the rocker panels this summer. They mount up using the original mounts for the side steps like most other guys have done. The only exception is the middle bracket had to be modified to get the right height. I tested them with my jack and they’re easily strong enough to use for lifting a wheel. My goal was to lose as little ground clearance as possible, so I made them fit nice and tight to the body, with just enough gap to be able to flex slightly upwards under load without touching. It’s a very basic setup but I’m happy to have that extra bit of protection just in case. You can hardly even tell they’re there In preparation for the season I also swapped out my rusted and damaged smitty trail jack for a hi lift extreme 48” which is much nicer quality and should last forever. I plan to keep it covered in WD40 to keep the rust away and I wipe on a light coat every couple weeks. I’ve padlocked it to the mount just in case Last but not least, I noticed my driver side CV was starting to rattle when I was going over small bumps. At first it sounded like something was loose in the suspension but it turned out to be the inner joint. When I tried to turn the shaft back and forth by hand it had noticeable play. Being that I didn’t want to break it on the trail again like last year, I swapped it out for a new one. The brand is GSP I think? Fairly cheap. Absolutely zero binding at full droop, even with no sway bar, and it’s actually so smooth I had to double check that my hub was really engaged. Time will tell if it lasts, but overall it seems to be good quality. I just wish I had the motivation and time to swap my Rockford boots onto it. From what I can tell, this one seems to be in the pre-facelift style with the round flange rather than the tri-flange shape, which I believe means it should have a slightly better range of motion (provided its made to OE spec) because I think I read somewhere the earlier models had slightly longer struts. Anyway, I think that just about covers everything I’ve done in the last several months. Next up this year Ill be redoing the rear bumper with plate steel now that I have a garage again. Even though mine is still functional, I’m sick of the plastic bumper cover. Then maybe I’ll look into some aluminum skids and a locker. It’s shaping up to be an awesome summer, I’m super excited to hit the trails again.
    2 points
  16. Disregard. I found it. This forum is not helpful at all.
    2 points
  17. I’ve bought a couple of things from Fleury and he makes good quality stuff. His missing link is robust.
    2 points
  18. Good points, I agree as to the cost factor. Problem is it can't be cheaper if I make a few of them only. It would be cheaper in mass production obviously but like you said there's no need for that. My 15 racks are almost gone now and my next batch will be 5 likely. With aluminum and labor cost being historically high and all covid issues, my profit margin on these has shrunk down to be enough to pay for gas money and my rack really. I just took it as an after work fun project and make an alternative to very limited options. My original plan was to get a few of the rhino rack crossbars for my rooftop tent but if I wanted 4, it would cost me roughly $1000CAD so I figured I build my own. There, for another $500 you get 8 crossbars, wind fairing, 100% rust resistance, more attachment options and lower profile while supporting a couple small businesses. Anyways, I'm hoping to keep a few in stock for those who decide to get them, might even spend some time on improvements for 2nd batch, I'll update here! Also, a lot of people asked me to make one for 2nd gen Xterra, that might be a slightly bigger market maybe. Side note, I was going to do skid plates too locally to not have people pay for shipping but aluminum sheets prices made it not worth it, SFCreation shipped is pretty much the same money now so I'll just grab one of his and support his R&D.
    2 points
  19. I, too, would like to know which brand of spring you used in the rear that sagged so quickly. I am going to buy springs soon and want to avoid what you used.
    2 points
  20. Turns out I shot way more footage than I thought I did. Also turns out I mumble, but I knew that. Anyway, here's what I did on mine.
    2 points
  21. Here are some brackets that bolt to the block, one houses the starter, another mounts to the alternator, the 2 pieces on top of the engine mounts, blended out all the nasty spots, sandblasted and Powdercoated, the hardware has been stripped of whatever nickel plating was left and a ceramic coating applied. Also did the transmission support and some pulleys oh and a power steering rod. You know me by now guys paint it blue and call it new! The blending of welds and casting splatter on those cast metal pieces was painful, hard work pays off!
    2 points
  22. Alright, so yeah, now this is coming back to me. That single taper H233B setup was actually identical to my 98 Frontier's H190 setup. Same bearing cage, bearing, shims, seal, etc. But, I guess I also thought there was a range of W/D21 drums that had the newer bearing cage like the R50, but seemingly that was limited to the wider axles (R50, D22, WD22). And yeah, that recessed axle nut in the bearing cage is absurd. I once bought a spanner that I thought would work, but wasn't even close. I've made a couple tools using my plasma table to do that work, but I sold one and Towndawg has the other for his disc brake swap. I made them to accept 1/2" ratchets/breakers in order to hit those torque specs, but in more recent efforts, have just resorted to hammer and punch. This was one of them. Wasn't a fan of the design, but worked: I liked this one better because it gave me some wings to smack with a hammer: When I first started getting into the axle shaft tear downs, I just went out and bought a floor press (was cheaper than outsourcing the work) and it's been a wonderful shop addition ever since (most recently used for a t-case upgrade). I just needed to make some tools to tear things down. This was one of my later setups using some scrap; just bolt onto the bearing cup and suspend in the floor press: Towndawg stepped it up and made one with a turn screw...no press required for disassembly. Looking at the FSM for my Frontier, though (and largely assuming that process hadn't changed for the single-taper design since '92), it shows use of a tool similar to Towndawg's for pulling the bearing w/o a press, but then shows just using a drift to reinstall the bearings (both outer and inner races). I've never done this job on my Frontier to confirm, and now that it has an H233B with discs under it, I won't have to. @gamellott Since the H190 bearing setup appears to be identical to your H233B setup (according to NissanPartsDeal.com, every part from the axle lock nut to the seal on a '92 is a VIN match to my '98), let me know if I can get you some pics from my H190 to confirm anything for you.
    2 points
  23. Some supporting pics... Sliders aren't attached here, just resting on jacks before I changed the mounts, but you can see how badly they jammed up into the pinch seam and rocker panel. Front leg: Rear leg: There's just nothing to prevent them from shifting upward except the pinch seam. How it sits today with my QX4 mounts, but you can see the lack of a gap at the door corner and further back. Doesn't hinder the door, though, but does rub just enough. The slider bodies are stout enough, though. No complaints there; just the mounting style I disliked. Shot of reinforced OE mounts and trail abuse since (my muffler has taken a beating): Here's basically how I had converted OE step rail mounts for use on mine and R50JR's sliders. I really liked the results. Just chopped off the legs and cut side plates to stiffen them up.
    2 points
  24. here is my intro post, which is what i believe to be a premise to this topic haven't logged in here in a while. hope everyone's recovering from modern pandemia. certainly drove me nuts starting off in town as a fast food worker. now i am settled in my early 20s with an oil gun and expertise on oil maintenance reminder reset procedures (for a small business with seniority). leaky susan, whom i call now the fleenmobile, is still in my possession and as of now i have clocked in 9k miles since i claimed her two years ago. back in october last year my inexperience with snow/sleet covered roads took the better of my driving capabilities and as a result, slid into the side of a crew cab pickup. everyone involved was ok, and the other party had full coverage while i ride on liability. accidents happen but i can't say that i didn't have a bad taste in my mouth over this for a while. the damage you see is purely cosmetic. i'll live with my inflated insurance rate. my affection for my truck hasn't faltered. in fact, this really pushed my encouragement to restore this truck, mainly in spirit. i don't aim for this to be show quality, but to be respectably solid. per request from my boss, who also has a mechanics shop on the same property as i quickly lube sixer mustangs and fiat rams, i have compiled a list of things to do for my truck to start off and i hope to get on with it this summer, and hopefully be involved in doing work for someone who hasn't had much opportunity to do some decent mechanical and suspension work and not feel intimidated by it. just finished replacing the pads and rotors on this truck yesterday. those hubs were a bit frustrating to figure out on my own, but it was more time consuming for me than it was difficult any advice regarding the bodywork or anything is welcome; i think i'm going to make this an update topic for my truck. anyways, i'll still be around reading through. thank you all for this community.
    2 points
  25. Besides having to change your username to Unibodiez, probably not. Most of the 01 VQ issues (mainly power valve screws and IACV gasket) happen at 100k-200k mile range. You’ll want to check the oil regularly in case it burns some or if it springs a leak- oil cooler, valve covers, rear main seal are some of the top culprits. Keep premium fuel in it. These are coil on plug engines as well, but the coil packs tend to stay in good shape for over 150k +. It’s a good idea to keep fresh fluid in the tranny, they don’t take well to abuse. these vehicles don’t typically have overheating issues. Just take it easy. If it’s been somewhat regularly run and maintained, it should be a smooth journey home. I’m sure other people will have something to add to the aforementioned.
    2 points
  26. Awesome video, glad he made it. I hope RCR sees it and possibly reviews the 3rd gen 4runner soon. I guarantee he’ll be mentioning the pathfinder favorably when he feels how badly those things ride on the road, and how under powered they are in comparison.
    2 points
  27. Opinions are like a**holes, everyone has one. This guy from what I can gather is he is trying the serious/satirical shtick in the vain of the likes of AvE, not too serious but serious enough to get a bee in the Pathfinder communities bonnet. In my opinion (a**hole ?) I reckon Tyler's latest video sums it all up pretty well, and presents all our defenses and Mr Regular's inaccuracies, I don't think we could ask much more than that with Tyler stepping up defending our community, in a great facts based video. My opinion on coke vs pepsi argument, well I don't think you can go wrong with any of the Japanese mid-range/sized 4x4 wagons: Pathfinder/xterra, 4Runner/Surf, Challenger, Rocky/Feroza, Amigo/Fronterra and so on... the whole Japanese range of gear has been built to a standard of "make it the best we can" and the Japanese excel at that with the aforementioned vehicles all being relatively bullet proof (due to detuned engines with strong drive train formula), economical to purchase, and parts still being readily available for most models. All have their quirks and known issues, but it is just that, they are "known" issues, with the advent of the interwebs we can do a quick search of what may have grabbed our attention on marketplace and you can read every person who has been arsed to record their experiences on [insert model] and build an opinion on weather it is worth investing in or steering clear of, basically what I done when i seen Hoss on the Stalkbook Marketplace. Just because some YouTuber called our cars "boring" doesn't really bother me, I know what I got and I like it, and that is all that matters to me. Quick side note: "TFL Classics" on YouTube have been showing the Pathfinders some love (albeit a WD21) on their channel, and hopefully we could see them move into a R50 if they keep following their current trend of loving the Nissan branded gear at the moment ? Thanks for listening to my TED talk ?
    2 points
  28. Filmed a TikTok, grilling on my makeshift tire rack table. I hope to make a production model later this year.
    2 points
  29. x2 on the OME springs. They are a great spring that sells well for those not wanting more than 2" of lift. I had OME MD rear springs for a long time and paired them with a set of Bilstein's. Fantastic for hauling heavier loads like camp gear and dogs. With the assistance of a set of Airlift spring helpers they handled our 18ft toy hauler superbly. With no load they were well mannered and kept the truck tight on the road without being harsh. Definitely recommend them if you're looking for a heavier duty 2" rear spring. Cant really go wrong with ARB products. Installed with spacers and airlift spring helpers not long after I got the truck:
    2 points
  30. For a sec I thought that 4runner was your pathfinder. Looks like a fun snow day Sent from my Pathfinder
    2 points
  31. Ok, fine sir. Seeing the quality of the rack, and it is pretty. How about a bumper system, or a front bumper. Winch capable, bull bar, 6" LED blinkers, and I'd gladly pay $1500 for that. R50s need those, really, rilly, bad. Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    1 point
  32. Truthfully, 90-95% of Pathfinder owners are not the target market. That’s the reason why there isn’t a market for stuff like this. Most Pathfinder/Nissan owners would own a Toyota or Jeep if they could afford it. Very few people are actual Nissan fans and simply buy because they’re cheap or couldn’t find something else. Buying roof rack that is 1/4 of the value of a car may not even be a smart decision in the long run. Still, I’m sure the amount of work OP has put in was exhaustive.
    1 point
  33. @Slartibartfast I think I need to come visit and borrow your custom made socket for this job.
    1 point
  34. Yeah, RA did sell me a set of VG33 intake gaskets for my VG30 once. That was a fun job to redo. I had a look and found the footage from when I did mine. I think I was letting it sit until I knew if my rear wheels were going to fall off afterwards. They haven't, so I'll brush that up and get it posted. It's less a "how to" and more a "watch this guy struggle" but there might still be something useful in there.
    1 point
  35. Not regularly, no. Personal projects have been consuming most of our time, but we've been talking about making a few more soon to clear out inventory. No, we've not discussed that approach. I've read of others doing it, but not interested in going that route, either.
    1 point
  36. What is BAT? Autotrader? I’ve used cars.com, autotrader, Craigslist & recently FaceBook Marketplace & OfferUp.
    1 point
  37. I may be working in Southern OR some & was considering something reliable that I was familiar with for a local car instead of a rental. [mention=37543]TowndawgR50[/mention] has been looking N Cal to PNW for a friend recently & is attuned to the market. The PNW is traditionally one of the most expensive new & used markets in the nation. This was backed up when I ran a nationwide spread sheet on 2012 & 2013 Infiniti G37xS back in 2015. I also bought a new 2018 4Runner & negotiated in Toyota’s PNW, Intermountain & Upper Midwest markets, ultimately ordering out of KCMO. I literally saved several thousand dollars on each vehicle. We bet we could resell that beige 2001 for $6,000-6,500 in the Seattle area with no problem. My cut point was about $5,400 because, if I changed my mind, I felt I could still recoup sales tax, auction fee, gas & insurance at that level without any concern. I was hoping it would go for $6,500-8,000 so I wouldn’t feel bad. I wouldn’t buy one from a dealer but there are ones with twice the miles being sold as high as $8,000 here.
    1 point
  38. It's in great shape but not amazing. Mine was in better shape with 150k+ miles on it (albeit it's an SE, not an LE). The state of that roof's paint is concerning. It looks to be down to bare metal in some parts:
    1 point
  39. The OME springs are very popular and are a great spring that yields 2”. Ran them for several years, zero complaints. Same is true for the front springs. The ride is superb when paired with their struts and shocks, but they’re on the pricey side. The LRs are a great solution for more lift and load handling, but the OMEs are perfect otherwise.
    1 point

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