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Rear locking diff


TerranoNZ
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I want to get a locker. I need some advice on what would suit me best. 1st idea was to get an ARB air locker, has anyone got one? I'd like to hear from 88 and how his lock rite works. Do they lock when going round corners? Did some looking online but would rather get some people who aren't trying to sell one to tell me about them. :beer:

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airlockers are great if you got the cash. well built, strong, reliable & selectable. end of story

 

i dont think much of lock rites but everyone else seems to thing there great aswell, but far cheaper.

 

i liked my airlocker so much i pulled it out of the pathy and now its in the patrol

Edited by sw
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Yup, air locker is the way if you are considering having a well-rounded rig that can drive daily and move across ssserious shallenges. I don't know about non-selectable, but you won't regret the air for the air-downs and other air accesories neither, bro.

:oops: happy thanksgiving.

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I think my Lockright works great. Check the vid. You will see me go up a trail with my locker and a jeep without one go behind me. Its way cheaper than a air locker and works just as good. Like you have probably found, it can be noisey and a little unpredictable at times, but I love it.

 

Edited by 5523Pathfinder
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I think my Lockright works great. Check the vid. You will see me go up a trail with my locker and a jeep without one go behind me. Its way cheaper than a air locker and works just as good. Like you have probably found, it can be noisey and a little unpredictable at times, but I love it.

 

I think I remember that...." that thing goes everwhere" Right?

 

That was :cool2: :bow:

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I dont want to jinks myself, but I havent got s---k yet. I dont want to say the word so you do the math. Its still a good everyday driver. The locker gives me good traction in the rain instead of spinning a tire. If you drive it right, it wont bother you.

Edited by 5523Pathfinder
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Ok, I am using this thread to answer a question about how the Lockright locker performed in the snow and ice. I searched for the thread, but I couldnt find it. This morning here in Olympia, WA, we saw about a inch to 2 inches of snow. The problem was, it started as rain. The temp dropped to about 24 degrees at my house. This made for ice with a nice snow topping. Remembering that someone asked how the locker performed, I started on my way to work. Now, before I left, I aired my tires down to about 20psi for a better tread patch. I engauged my front hubs and used 4H. Pretty much all of the streets were covered with ice and I only went a max of 45mph. The locker acted better than I thought. I was able to drive fairly straight and didnt spin much when accelerating. It actually felt a lot like driving through mud for some strange reason. I did pop it into 2H at one point to see what would happened. Basicly, if you ever owned a rear wheel drive car with a LSD, its just like driving that. It wanted to kick sideways and spinout. In 4H, I jabbed the gas to see what would happen and it helped me stay straight for the most part. I felt very comfortable after that. Now I know this doesnt help the people who live in the areas who get deeper snow, but if we get more I will go out and do some more tests. Hope this helps someone!

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Eeek, seattle, that commute must have been fun. I should add that I traveled with traffic and did not drive stupidly. As in any bad weather, good judgement should be used. Slow and steady. I think maybe some driver skill may also be involed. I would hate for someone to install one and think that they are invincible. IF ANYONE INSTALLS A LOCKRIGHT, please make sure you take the time to learn how to drive your vehicle! It will feel very different, but you can get used to it and actually use it to your advantage!

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  • 4 years later...
  • 3 months later...

H233b diff locks 31 spline.

After several months of researching various diff locks for my D21 Pathfinder here is what I have found. Besides air lockers.

 

Power Trax make a locker for the 2 and 4 spider gear diffs (2 or 4 pinion)

Model 3210 for the 2 pinion

Model 3220 for the 4 pinion

These only replace the center part, eg the spider gears, so is not suitable for an LSD diff.

Cost around $350 + $60 shipping to Aust

 

Eaton, make a Detroit locker part #187SL-167A

Supposedly stronger, this replaces the whole center, ie you replace the whole center assy, and bolt your ring gear to it. Suitable to replacing the gust of an LSD diff, and 2 or 4 spider gear diff.

Cost around $620 + $188 shipping to Aust.

 

All these stay locked, but one side unlocks for cornering, when torque is removed. But, if when cornering, you put your foot down, they will lock, and push you straight ahead. I’ve also read they can make some noise as they unlock and lock.

H233b diffs are in the front of some patrols, if they be 2 or 4 spider gear I’m not sure. This maybe why some retailers only stock a locker for the font of a Patrol even though its an H233b diff there

I intend get the Detroit in the new year.

 

Hope this helps someone.

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I live where it snows in winter and have used lock-rights,detroits and ARBs.I run Rubicon trail every year.This is from my experience.If you drive rig everyday I would not go with detroit locker.It can be a bit of a handful.(I am running detroit now)Lock-rights work well and are inexpensive.I have only broke pins once and that was with 36x14.50x15 swampers.The ARB is best all around(in my opinion)but also most expensive.

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Just a note on the use of ARB lockers in cold climates ...

 

Some of the Jeep guys I wheel with here in Alberta have experienced failure of ARB lockers to engage during cold (-20C and lower) weather. This, they attributed to hardening and contraction of O-rings in the air system at these low temperatures. Summer operation was fine. The fix was the swap out the O-rings for ones of the same dimension, but with better cold temperature performance. A local 4x4 builder I know replaces the o-rings with cold weather spec ones during new installation rather than wait for locker failure.

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  • 6 months later...
  • 6 months later...

My 1995 Has a LSD from the factory, seems to work fine in the mud, snow and ice. I've also got a 2007 Chevy 2500HD Diesel pickup from the factory it has a detroit locker, my wife hates it, it makes a noticeble "clunk" when going around coreners in wet weather (doesnt help that I have a lead foot, LOL). I dont mind it at all, they work great (Detroit Lockers) and dont have to be managed from the drivers seat. Considering one for my pathy when I get around to the SAS, whenever that may be.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well just my little bit of input, I got my pathfinder November 2011 knowing I do a lot of 4x4ing I welded the spider gears, to give a 100% full locked up rear end, it worked more than great except when turning sharp while going slow on Tarmac the rear tires chirp. After the 200,xxx miles I've put on it, needless to say the weld has since broken around 75,000 miles that I put on it and since then I haven't really 4x4ed much just the occasional trails and hill climbs, I did notice a giant difference between stock and welded posy, but after knowing how to wheel without the posy I don't think I wanna go back just yet.

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 month later...

Just a note on the use of ARB lockers in cold climates ...

 

Some of the Jeep guys I wheel with here in Alberta have experienced failure of ARB lockers to engage during cold (-20C and lower) weather. This, they attributed to hardening and contraction of O-rings in the air system at these low temperatures. Summer operation was fine. The fix was the swap out the O-rings for ones of the same dimension, but with better cold temperature performance. A local 4x4 builder I know replaces the o-rings with cold weather spec ones during new installation rather than wait for locker failure.

 

I've had front and rear ARB's for about 12 years and not had any problems. They are pricier but can't them them for reliability and versatility, but the budget takes a hit.

 

Do you have any part # or know where/what brand or o-rings the builder used. After 12 years, probably time for maintenance and might as well do an upgrade to the colder rated o-rings. Planning to do more playing in the snow this winter.

 

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  • 6 months later...

So since someone already brought it up....and didn't get bashed for it...

I have thought about welding my diff. being a 2wd with an open rear that I like to treat as a 4wd, I believe welding it would greatly improve my chances of catching some grip when off camber or hill climbing.

Has anyone here done this in a 2wd???

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ok I guess not..

I noticed I have a tag or sticker on my rear diff cover. It's too faded to read,but I was wondering if it could be the identifier of an LSD? I doubt it because it seems to just spin the same one wheel on wet roads way too easy, but thought I'd double check..

20150201_092411_zpswre3o7qo.jpg

Yes, I know it's dirty, leaking a bit and needs to be resealed..I'll get to it and get it cleaned up...

Edited by RCAR50
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Ok I guess not..

I noticed I have a tag or sticker on my rear diff cover. It's too faded to read,but I was wondering if it could be the identifier of an LSD? I doubt it because it seems to just spin the same one wheel on wet roads way too easy, but thought I'd double check..

20150201_092411_zpswre3o7qo.jpg

Yes, I know it's dirty, leaking a bit and needs to be resealed..I'll get to it and get it cleaned up...

I wouldn't recommend welding the diff if you have any intention of using it as a daily driver. You will eat up tires or break things. Every time you go around a corner, one wheel needs to rotate faster than the other. With it welded, you'll have a lot of wheel hop and chirping (and it'll be squirrelly when it's wet out). It's acceptable on loose terrain where traction can break, but on roads, something else will break.

 

As for the sticker, it's orange and usually wider than it is tall, says to use LSD oil.

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