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Teesetz

Automatic Transmission Additive

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Might be preaching to the choir, but just wanted to share to those that might not know. Asked my dad who’s been in the parts business longer than my current life span about transmission fluid additives that would actually make difference in performance. He said LubeGard Platinum is the only thing he’d put in a transmission. I took his advice and it’s mad an immense difference in transmission performance. Worth every penny. e73c3ac1539fe1ccb6ac3521666602f7.jpg

 

 

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This stuff also gets high praise in the Acura MDX forums for the 2001-2006 models that have known transmission issues. Some people have put it in a transmission, along with fresh fluid, that just started shifting strangely and it has fixed it for an extended period meaning 10k or more miles.

They have several formulations and a chart on their website for what to use it in. This one as I recall is for fluids that meet the individual car makers spec.

There are others that can uprate a fluid - like take a generic Dextron 3 fluid and take it to the enhanced Honda equivalent.

I don't know if Nissan requires this. I only owned manual transmission Nissans.

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Whoops sorry looks like your pic is the uprate version. I've been looking at the other for use in Honda OEM fluid.

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What change did you see after adding this stuff? Was it having issues before?

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I was having intermittent hard 1-2, and on the freeway when I’d step off gas and then lightly get back on (not enough to downshift) it’s like it would 1/2 downshift for a second and then go back to o/d or 5th. Comparable to a shudder I guess. Both issues have cleared up immensely.

 

 

 

 

 

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Good to know, haven't heard of that one.

 

I started having some hard shifts and flaring after a fluid exchange and Lucas transmission fix helped a lot. I still need a rebuild eventually though.

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Thanks for the tip @Teesetz! 
 

I recently brought a 2003 pathy WXii st with 105k. It shifts hard between 1st and 2nd and I was looking into whether I should replace the transmission fluid or just top up with an additive. 
 

the transmission fluid *might* have been replaced in 2017 at about 80k, but I can’t tell from the mech report - it lists that the rear/front and transfer case oil was replace. 
 

After wiping the dip stick on a white fabric it appears reddish. I guess what I’m asking is the risk too great to change my transmission oil now? 

 

 

 

5F654816-756D-4C5F-8B03-EA7A2ACE6E9B.jpeg

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If you are having any transmission issues, change the fluid. This is always safe to do as long as you replace with the recommended fluid. Just don't do a power flush.

 

Worn ATF can look reddish on the dipstick but nasty black when you have 6 inches deep in a drain pan.

 

In fact if you don't know the last drain and fill date, and your first drain is black, I'd do it a 2nd time within 1k miles. When you drain it, you are only replacing half the fluid on average each time.

 

Also if you have a filter in the pan I'd replace it before serious transmission work.

 

Once you think you have it stabilized, if the Pathy has an integrated radiator ATF cooler to make the pump output easy to access, I'd plumb a Magnefine magnetic filter into it.

 

Also for the Honda with known radiator leaking into ATF issues, I bypassed the radiator and put the biggest external ATF cooler I could find in front of the radiator.

 

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No problem. For personal peace of mind I would change it. And maybe change it twice like he mentioned. I know there is controversy on a total flush loosening things and causing more problems than solving anything, and I would agree with that. In my personal conclusion 2 changes contrary to a single flush and then using LubeGard is a safe bet.

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Thanks for the advice @colinnwn @Teesetz! I'll drain and refill and let you know how I get on. This will be the first time I've done it - but I've found a 1Auto video that looks fairly straight forward as a well as the service manual. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. 

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Only real tip I offer is to measure what you drain out, and replace with the same amount if your fluid level is in the operating range. It is a lot easier than estimating and lowering the level if you over fill. 

Always check the fluid level with the trans at operating temperature and on level surface. An over filled trans can cause problems, so you want it to be accurate. Slightly low is better than over with them. 

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I haven't done it in a Pathy since mine was manual. I've done it on a Scout and Acura MDX.

 

I know the recommended way is to have the car at operating temp. But I don't like risking a burn.

 

After running the car for a sec and shifting through the gears, I double check the fluid level in the driveway and add (yes the cost of a little extra fresh ATF flowing out isn't a big deal to me) or remove to get it level. Then I drive it around the block only enough to mix the fluid and particulates and get it to about 120 degrees. Then I check the level one more time and do the drain and fill.

 

I have an empty 5 qt oil jug with the clear measuring strip on the side to pour the old ATF into for the amount. Then I pour it into a Home Depot pail for returning for recycling and keep my handy old jug.

 

Hopefully the Pathy has a drain since you said it was straightforward. If you have to crack the pan to drain, have a gasket ready. Damn things never reseal in my experience. I n my Scout I put in an aftermarket drain plug kit the first time I did it because it required cracking the pan.

 

Don't forget to double check the fluid level at the end.

 

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Yes, the pan has a drain plug, and the Nissan approved service process was simply a drain and fill. The Asian manufacturers were a bit odd in the eyes of the American companies in that they put drain plugs in everything that held fluid. Drain plugs in transmissions and differentials? That's just insane! Everyone knows that pan removal is the proper way to change oil. But for some reason manual transmissions, transfer cases, and engines had drain plugs. Heavy equipment had drains also, so never made sense to not have them in cars and light trucks. 

My old 1975 280z and 1977 200sx even had fuel tank drain plugs. 

Edited by Mr_Reverse
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When the trans went out in my friend's Blazer, we drilled a hole in the pan to drain it rather than wrestle a full pan around the exhaust and probably spill it from hell to breakfast. We also added a drain plug to the new pan just in case we ever had to mess with it again. Drain plugs are good.

 

I flushed mine through the cooler lines (just stuck them in a bucket and ran it until it quit pumping fluid out, refilled, did it again, until the fluid coming out looked fresh), but did end up losing track of how much I'd put in vs taken out and ended up having to drain about a quart to get the level right. The level changes as the trans warms up, which can make it interesting to set and easy to overfill.

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[delete]

Edited by Slartibartfast

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On 1/29/2020 at 11:03 PM, Mr_Reverse said:

Slightly low is better than over with them.

Jeez I thought the opposite! I immediately went out and checked mine. I am at the very top of the indicator piece. Maybe the tiniest bit on to the braided wire.. I dont notice anything odd so im gonna leave it alone. 

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