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Quirks of my new-to-me Pathy & what to do about them..

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I have a tiny mirror epoxyed to the bottom on edge of the ecu , so I don't have to stick my head down in my floorboards.

 

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I think I'll try to slide my seat forward today and see if I can have a good angle to view everything.

 

I have a tiny mirror epoxyed to the bottom on edge of the ecu , so I don't have to stick my head down in my floorboards.

 

 

That's a great idea!! I may look into doing that just for future use :P

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+1 on the CEL Coming on due to the speedo. Mine was on and replaced the cable on my D21 and the light went out.... Presto!

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+1 on the CEL Coming on due to the speedo. Mine was on and replaced the cable on my D21 and the light went out.... Presto!

 

I'm suspecting that's what it is as everything else appears to be mechanically sound.

 

I slid my passenger seat forward all of the way and there are two screws holding the cover on top of the ECU, sadly I looked around the house and I don't have any tools to either A) take off the seat completely, or B) remove the screws at an angle.. If I could have easily gotten to it I was going to find out which CEL codes it is outputting to avoid paying the fees at a shop to diagnose it for me.

 

Would you believe that every auto parts store who offers free CEL diagnosing can't and/or won't diagnose my 95 pathy because it has the OBD1 thing-a-majig? I think that's silly... "Oh we can help you! What year is your vehicle?" "It's a '95!" "... ooh... I am sorry but we can't help you". I don't see why auto parts stores don't keep the tools around to diagnose pre 96 CEL's. Unless it's all just a grand scheme to keep the car owner oppressed! haa.. kidding, but seriously! >_>;

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That surprises me a little.... It seems the older vehicles would need the service more, right? If your speedo isn't working you gotta fix it anyway, the light might just go away. Happy 4th of July! (yesterday)lol

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That surprises me a little.... It seems the older vehicles would need the service more, right? If your speedo isn't working you gotta fix it anyway, the light might just go away. Happy 4th of July! (yesterday)lol

 

Right?! I was thinking that at least one store / shop that I visited would have at least pointed me in the right direction or gave me an address to a shop that'll do the complimentary "this is what your ECU is complaining about" test... Overall I found my experiences with shops good, until I mentioned that I had a 95, then it felt as if my experience went downhill..

 

I was considering just taking care of that ahead of diagnosing the CEL, if it's indeed the vehicle's speed sensor that needs to be replaced that may be cheaper than getting the CEL diagnosed then spending probably double the money when I could have saved it in the first place getting the speed sensor replaced.

 

Would you, and others, recommend that I do my own research for a reputable shop that works on Nissan's OR go straight to the dealer where I know I'll have X fixed but pay a premium to have work done at a dealership?

 

I also had another question... how much do you, or anyone else, think a new clutch would run me? .. that is a shop installing it as I don't have the tools nor know-how to complete a clutch replacement on my own (and to be honest I'd be a bit afraid to do so!! I really don't want to break my primary mode of transportation..)

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When it comes to care and maintenance of your vehicle the more you learn to do your self the better. However when It comes to some jobs that you don't have the skill, tool or space to do finding a good mechanic takes a little effort.

1. ask around, trusted friends and relatives people you work with can help narrow down the search.

2. once you've narrowed it down go and check out the shop, is it clean? are the staff friendly. are there similar vehicles to yours in the yard?

3.I prefer owner/operator type shops as by talking with them I can usually get a "vibe"

4. sometimes cheapest prices could mean poorest work. I believe you get what you pay for.

 

As an example I just had the exhaust done on my R50. I asked around to a few guys I know with custom jeeps and Toyotas and as well as a local 4x4 parts store...1 shop name kept coming up. So I paid them a visit..I talked with the owner, told him what I needed and He asked some questions as to weather I wanted more performance or if I wanted to stay stock then gave me a ball park figure for both.

when the funds were available I made an appointment. when I arrived they put the truck on the lift check things out then invited me into the shop took me under the truck and showed me what they were going to do. I mentioned that I do take my truck off road and they assured me that they'd tuck everything up good.

when the work was finished, they again took me under the truck and showed me their work. and gave me some advice as to some other things that need doing.

all in all a very good experience for me. price was much cheeper that the muffler only shop yet not so cheep that I questioned the quality and he stuck to his quote.

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When it comes to care and maintenance of your vehicle the more you learn to do your self the better. However when It comes to some jobs that you don't have the skill, tool or space to do finding a good mechanic takes a little effort.

1. ask around, trusted friends and relatives people you work with can help narrow down the search.

2. once you've narrowed it down go and check out the shop, is it clean? are the staff friendly. are there similar vehicles to yours in the yard?

3.I prefer owner/operator type shops as by talking with them I can usually get a "vibe"

4. sometimes cheapest prices could mean poorest work. I believe you get what you pay for.

 

As an example I just had the exhaust done on my R50. I asked around to a few guys I know with custom jeeps and Toyotas and as well as a local 4x4 parts store...1 shop name kept coming up. So I paid them a visit..I talked with the owner, told him what I needed and He asked some questions as to weather I wanted more performance or if I wanted to stay stock then gave me a ball park figure for both.

when the funds were available I made an appointment. when I arrived they put the truck on the lift check things out then invited me into the shop took me under the truck and showed me what they were going to do. I mentioned that I do take my truck off road and they assured me that they'd tuck everything up good.

when the work was finished, they again took me under the truck and showed me their work. and gave me some advice as to some other things that need doing.

all in all a very good experience for me. price was much cheeper that the muffler only shop yet not so cheep that I questioned the quality and he stuck to his quote.

 

True.. Asking around for trusted friends and relatives in the area is probably going to be a good place to start and go from there. Thank you, I'll definitely keep your tips in mind!

 

That's also a great point about the cost being so cheap that the quality of work is being questioned; we do get what we pay for...

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The speedo and tach is usually an electronic failure internal to the gauges in the 94-95 Pathy and HB, requiring replacement or if you know electronic diagnostic and repair to open them up and replace the failed components.

 

The factory alarm unit used in the WD21 was a terrible unit that was not worth messing with. Just replace it with an aftermarket one or disconnect it is your best options. a $50 unit will be more reliable and offer just as many functions if not more. The remote start unit I replaced mine with also lets me pop the hatch glass with the remote as well as the locks and panic functions.

 

The problem with pulling codes on OBD1 is there is no standards. Every manufacturer is different and often was different in the models as well. My diagnostic box has a drawer dedicated to connector plugs for OBD1 and there is more than 15 different plugs in there and I don't even have them all. I am still often jumpering and decoding flash codes anyway. 2 of the requirements for OBD2 was to have a standard connector plug and a set of standard codes. That is why parts stores and most shops don't offer free code pulling for OBD1.

You don't have to remove the seat or cover to get the codes from the 95 path. Just slide the seat to the front(I also tip the seat back to the front to give more room) and from the right rear door, lean in with your head near the floor. You will see a small round hole near the oval opening that lets you view the red and green LEDs in the ECU. Using a small flat blade pocket screwdriver, poke through the small hole and turn the dial to access the different modes for the ECU. Nissan actually made it a bit easier than many others to retrieve codes.

 

Hope this helps

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A bit of an update for those who are interested..

 

I took my Pathy to a trusted Japanese Auto Repair shop and discovered a lot more problems than I originally had anticipated. My mom noticed that I was leaking oil under where I normally park, I checked it out for myself and there's quite a few spots. So I immediately booked an appointment the next afternoon to have my truck looked at, for free, by the repair shop and they told me that my engine was bleeding oil everywhere, not specifically the engine but the oil pan, gasket, etc.. I was also told that my clutch is practically non existent and since it's my primary mode of transportation I was warned that I should baby it for as long as needed until I have enough money saved to get a new clutch. I was also cautioned about my timing belt, as the mechanics found that there was a Nissan stamp on my belts, we don't know how old it really is.. Every 60k miles it should be replaced and at the moment it's unknown if how many miles it has on it. Scary stuff..

 

All in all, for a new timing belt, clutch, and to fix everywhere that's bleeding oil will run me about 1800. Since I am still paying it off and have about 1800 remaining on my financing, with my down payment, I will end up paying close to 4k for this truck when everything is said and done and it's 100% mechanically sound again... though I hope that because it's a 90's Japanese car, once this is all done it will continue to run for a very long time. I've heard of Nissan's running well into the 400k mileage mark, along with other Japanes cars, Toyota's, Honda's etc.. Let's hope for the best, right?!

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The timing belt is actually due every 105k on the 94-95 models. But still, if it's never been changed, it needs to be done asap. I would do the timing belt yourself if you are willing. It's not that hard and it would probably save you 500-800 dollars.

 

As for the oil leaks, check the valve covers, and if they're wet, try and tighten the screws slightly as this may help. If you see oil coming down between the oil pan and tranny, it is probably the rear main seal, and the tranny would have to come off to replace that, so that is the kind of thing you'd do when you change the clutch, which is probably ruined because of the rear main leak.

 

I would crawl around under there yourself and make sure you know whats leaking. The shop may be trying to pull a fast one on you.

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The timing belt is actually due every 105k on the 94-95 models. But still, if it's never been changed, it needs to be done asap. I would do the timing belt yourself if you are willing. It's not that hard and it would probably save you 500-800 dollars.

 

As for the oil leaks, check the valve covers, and if they're wet, try and tighten the screws slightly as this may help. If you see oil coming down between the oil pan and tranny, it is probably the rear main seal, and the tranny would have to come off to replace that, so that is the kind of thing you'd do when you change the clutch, which is probably ruined because of the rear main leak.

 

I would crawl around under there yourself and make sure you know whats leaking. The shop may be trying to pull a fast one on you.

 

I'm not mechanically inclined enough I think though.. I wouldn't want to mess up anything important like a timing belt.

 

I was actually taken into the shop while the truck was up on the lift and the mechanic pointed out all of the spots that were leaking and I saw them for myself with my phone's flashlight. I am fairly sure that they aren't trying to pull a fast one.. I spoke with some friends who have japanese brand cars and they've gone to this same shop and they always says good things about them and the work they do. I'm totally not going haphazardly to shops and trusting them without talking to people and doing my own research :)

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