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What type of 2-pin connectors are used for clutch/brake pedal switch, steering lock, etc?

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The ignition cylinder in my '93 WD21 Pathfinder has been on its way out for a while now—I have to pull on & fiddle with the ignition wiring bundle for the key to make appropriate contact to start it—and, not wanting the weight of keys to continue to wear out some random replacement, I've decided to try an EASYGUARD EC110 push start button.

 

The wiring looks straightforward and I've traced it all out (with the exception of the door locks), but I'm a bit OCD and really dislike splicing/tapping wires, if at all possible (esp. when attempting to _resolve_ wiring issues.) I'd like to make a mini harness that taps into appropriate connections by plugging in between them. Fortunately, it came with a 6-pin connector that should fit for the ignition/starter harness, but I'm looking for the 2-pin connectors used for the brake & clutch pedal switches, steering lock, etc. Does anyone know what they're called, what part number they are, or where I might be able to get one?

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A further look at the connectors shows some of them differ slightly from the ones I can easily see in the steering column wiring. That said, there was one that I was able to see said "S02FL", which was enough to get me to the following documentation of Series 58 connectors: http://prd.sws.co.jp/components/series/pdf/jp/58.pdf. So, that's a start, but Mouser doesn't have much in the way of the Series 58 connectors, so it may be extremely difficult to actually find them. :(

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I replaced just the switch on my '93. It can be replaced pretty easily without removing the whole lock cylinder. The switch itself doesn't hold the weight of the keys, so that shouldn't be a problem. Couple of screws, plug and play. If you have to remove the whole cylinder, you have to drill out the fasteners. The physical lock also controls the steering lock, so if you remove the physical lock to fit the Easyguard, you'll also lose the steering lock.

I know the guys behind Project Binky managed to track down some Sumitomo connector components for wiring their bonkers Mini (their harness had an odd mix of plugs on it), so it's probably out there somewhere. I'd be less worried about wiring splices (provided they were done right) than I would be about something going wrong with the $40 push-and-pray keyless start button kit.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Slartibartfast said:

I replaced just the switch on my '93. It can be replaced pretty easily without removing the whole lock cylinder. The switch itself doesn't hold the weight of the keys, so that shouldn't be a problem. Couple of screws, plug and play. If you have to remove the whole cylinder, you have to drill out the fasteners. The physical lock also controls the steering lock, so if you remove the physical lock to fit the Easyguard, you'll also lose the steering lock.

 

My '93 doesn't seem to have the screws on the switch, otherwise I would've just done that long ago. I don't mind drilling out the screws and removing/replacing the whole lock cylinder, I've done it before on my Land Rover Series III. I'm also well aware that I'd lose the steering lock.

 

11 minutes ago, Slartibartfast said:

I know the guys behind Project Binky managed to track down some Sumitomo connector components for wiring their bonkers Mini (their harness had an odd mix of plugs on it), so it's probably out there somewhere. I'd be less worried about wiring splices (provided they were done right) than I would be about something going wrong with the $40 push-and-pray keyless start button kit.

 

Well, I'll have to watch the Project Blinky episodes then and see if I can catch where they tracked down connectors. :)  As for the $40 keyless start system failing, I'm with you. At $40, I don't mind buying another (or a couple), but that's also part of the reason that I want to wire it in a non-destructive way. That said, I've been living with an intermittent ignition cylinder for a couple years, so I'm fairly used to the knowledge that one day it just may not start anymore (today actually happened to be that day).

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This picture (from a listing for a full cylinder) shows the one Phillips screw holding the switch in place (top right image, it's down under where the wires are soldered on when it's mounted on the truck). The switch itself looks like this, if that helps. I remember I thought I was in for a fight on mine until I moved the wires and discovered the screw behind them. It took me longer to route the wiring back through than it did to install the switch. Hopefully Nissan didn't do something weird on yours.

I think the Binky episode is this one. Doesn't look like they say which parts they used, though they do show what look like Sumitomo connectors around the 29 minute mark (and mention earlier that the harness they're using does use Sumitomo plugs, among others). They didn't mention the sourcing, unfortunately. Last ditch you could use the pigtail from your old starter switch and cut the others you need off a loom at the wreckers, and then splice those to the pigtails for the Easyguard. Yes, they're splices, but they're not splices into the original harness, so they can be unplugged if something goes wrong.

Now that I'm thinking about it, though, why do you need to tap into the brake and clutch switches in the first place? The truck's already got a starter interlock on the clutch, between the ignition switch and the starter, which should work the same with the Easyguard as it does with the factory switch. It should even have a rocker switch on the dash to turn the interlock off if needed (I think all years had that?). I'd just loop those wires at the box so it thinks the clutch is always depressed and leave the factory interlock in place. Otherwise you'd have to butcher the factory harness to bypass the old interlock, or you'd have two interlocks on the same circuit to try and troubleshoot later and a switch on the dash that doesn't do anything. And what does it need a brake pedal feed for? Unless it needs that signal for programming the keys or something, I'd just loop that one, too. Otherwise you'd have to make some kind of tee harness off one of the switches on the pedal (one for the brake lights and one to cancel the cruise control), and then I'd be concerned about the circuits cross-talking or frying something if the box is expecting a switched ground instead of switched +, or isn't expecting switched power at all.

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On 2/11/2019 at 12:57 AM, Slartibartfast said:

This picture (from a listing for a full cylinder) shows the one Phillips screw holding the switch in place (top right image, it's down under where the wires are soldered on when it's mounted on the truck). The switch itself looks like this, if that helps. I remember I thought I was in for a fight on mine until I moved the wires and discovered the screw behind them. It took me longer to route the wiring back through than it did to install the switch. Hopefully Nissan didn't do something weird on yours.

 

Well, don't I feel sheepish. Not sure how I missed that! I'll definitely just swap the switch while try to make a nice harness for the EC110.

 

On 2/11/2019 at 12:57 AM, Slartibartfast said:

I think the Binky episode is this one. Doesn't look like they say which parts they used, though they do show what look like Sumitomo connectors around the 29 minute mark (and mention earlier that the harness they're using does use Sumitomo plugs, among others). They didn't mention the sourcing, unfortunately. Last ditch you could use the pigtail from your old starter switch and cut the others you need off a loom at the wreckers, and then splice those to the pigtails for the Easyguard. Yes, they're splices, but they're not splices into the original harness, so they can be unplugged if something goes wrong.

 

Now, that was a satisfying wiring video. As a Land Rover guy, I already lnew all too much of that wiring harness history. Anyway, I'll definitely be searching local wrecker yards for connectors if I can't find them elsewhere.

 

On 2/11/2019 at 12:57 AM, Slartibartfast said:

Now that I'm thinking about it, though, why do you need to tap into the brake and clutch switches in the first place? The truck's already got a starter interlock on the clutch, between the ignition switch and the starter, which should work the same with the Easyguard as it does with the factory switch. It should even have a rocker switch on the dash to turn the interlock off if needed (I think all years had that?). I'd just loop those wires at the box so it thinks the clutch is always depressed and leave the factory interlock in place. Otherwise you'd have to butcher the factory harness to bypass the old interlock, or you'd have two interlocks on the same circuit to try and troubleshoot later and a switch on the dash that doesn't do anything. And what does it need a brake pedal feed for? Unless it needs that signal for programming the keys or something, I'd just loop that one, too. Otherwise you'd have to make some kind of tee harness off one of the switches on the pedal (one for the brake lights and one to cancel the cruise control), and then I'd be concerned about the circuits cross-talking or frying something if the box is expecting a switched ground instead of switched +, or isn't expecting switched power at all.

 

The EC110 normally needs to tap into the brake switch to ensure the push to start button doesn't work if your foot isn't on the brake as a safety mechanism. I'm moving mine over to the clutch pedal for the same reason, but—you're absolutely right—it needs to go after the interlock switch. I use my interlock switch fairly frequently, esp. off road, so I need to retain that. It actually should make it easier to wire in and keeps the wiring harness shorter.

 

Thanks again for all the advice, it's much appreciated!

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