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Led fog light replacement


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I’m looking to replace the fog lights on the Pathfinder with some led lights. The one I’m looking at is rated at 120w and 12v/24v compatible.

 

What I am looking to do is remove the old lights and cut off the harness, wiring it to the new headlights for a plug in connection. That way it can be operated from the original fog switch. And this light would fit in the original space on the bumper. Not cutting required.

 

Is this a good way to go and is the power specs right for the method I’m looking to install? I know some lights need a relay or something? Don’t want to fry any wiring.

 

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I personally would not use those types of led pods for fog/driving lights. They most likely are illegal because of the light scatter. For auxiliary lights they probably work well, but not for street use.


Sent from my Pathfinder

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I personally would not use those types of led pods for fog/driving lights. They most likely are illegal because of the light scatter. For auxiliary lights they probably work well, but not for street use.


Sent from my Pathfinder

Gotcha, thanks for the heads up.


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Those lights would likely work well and the way you want to wire them is legit, but I echo R50JR's concerns; it's probably technically illegal and may cause you trouble using them on the road. Some states even require them to be covered when on the road, but ones that small in the bumper would fly under the radar with regards to that. If you want brighter fogs you should be able to find LED bulbs that fit in the stock housings, but a picky cop could probably get you on that, although it would be very unlikely and pretty much isn't a risk in my opinion. Unlike just dropping an LED in a headlight housing, you shouldn't have any serious negative side effects from using an LED bulb in a fog light. You may be able to find something like this from a place light superbrightleds.

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40 minutes ago, mjotrainbrain said:

Those lights would likely work well and the way you want to wire them is legit, but I echo R50JR's concerns; it's probably technically illegal and may cause you trouble using them on the road. Some states even require them to be covered when on the road, but ones that small in the bumper would fly under the radar with regards to that. If you want brighter fogs you should be able to find LED bulbs that fit in the stock housings, but a picky cop could probably get you on that, although it would be very unlikely and pretty much isn't a risk in my opinion. Unlike just dropping an LED in a headlight housing, you shouldn't have any serious negative side effects from using an LED bulb in a fog light. You may be able to find something like this from a place light superbrightleds.

The reason I haven't replaced my fog lights with LEDs is because I did replace my headlights with LEDs and although they are great, they do reflect in the fog, so I wasn't about to chance it with the fog lights.  Perhaps you are right though, the fog lights are much smaller and might not reflect so much, especially if the LED is a warm white.

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The reason I haven't replaced my fog lights with LEDs is because I did replace my headlights with LEDs and although they are great, they do reflect in the fog, so I wasn't about to chance it with the fog lights.  Perhaps you are right though, the fog lights are much smaller and might not reflect so much, especially if the LED is a warm white.

Or try an amber.@TowndawgR50 replaced his bumper auxiliary lights & his roof LED bar with amber & it’s great. He loves it as a driver & I prefer it both following & being followed by him. It should definitely reflect less. My experiences last year in a white out have convinced me that all my cars that might see snow need an amber option as HID are just too reflective - of course, with LEDs they won’t burn off the snow so it’s nit a perfect solution.
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Or try an amber.[mention=37543]TowndawgR50[/mention] replaced his bumper auxiliary lights & his roof LED bar with amber & it’s great. He loves it as a driver & I prefer it both following & being followed by him. It should definitely reflect less. My experiences last year in a white out have convinced me that all my cars that might see snow need an amber option as HID are just too reflective - of course, with LEDs they won’t burn off the snow so it’s nit a perfect solution.

Hid lights in the oem headlight housings are a bit reflective but aiming the lamp a bit lower helps mitigate and almost eliminates scatter. Hid lights in the oem fog housings work perfectly with no problems.


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Hid lights in the oem headlight housings are a bit reflective but aiming the lamp a bit lower helps mitigate and almost eliminates scatter. Hid lights in the oem fog housings work perfectly with no problems.

 

I’m talking about OEM HIDs in my other vehicles - the excellent light output, but at 5-6,000K, is just a world different than the old 2700K halogens when it comes to reflectivity. Usually a good thing but not in heavy snow. I’ve come to the conclusion they’re nearly undrivable in a whiteout where you could have made it work with the old halogens. As a result, I’m putting an amber alternative on our family MDX after that experience.

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I have a pair of the Nilight amber LED fog lights on my truck that are similar to the ones pictured. They are actually designed as a fog light and the amber color works great. I have mine wired so I can shut off the headlights to minimize the glare and back scatter by just running the marker lights and fogs in heavy snow/rain/fog. Done all 3 and have been pleased with my $35 set of Nilights. Enough so that I added a small bar and a couple floods angled out to my front bumper of my 93. 

Amber or yellow lights have always worked better in inclement weather than white. Probably would in dust storms as well, same principal, the longer wave length is less dazzling. 

 

A little tip I was given almost 30 years ago living in rural deer country, have a set of yellow lights to help prevent ramming the mule deer in my region. The yellow light helps keep them from freezing in front of you like they will with white lights. I found that when I ran my yellow fogs with the headlights that I had fewer close calls driving the roads back then.  

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