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Is overheating in 100 degree weather normal?


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So today I was drove about 15 miles on the freeway in around 100-103 degree (Fahrenheit) weather. Going to my destination I had the AC running on full, but when I was about a mile away I turned it off as the needle on the car was approaching the danger zone. Coming home I had the AC off and the windows down, but the engine temperature still got rather close to the warning zone by the time I was home.

 

I understand the WD21's are getting significantly old by today's standards, but I'm just wondering if this can be avoided? I know 100 degrees is pretty hot, but typically I think the engine runs at 200-250 degrees, so the constant flow of air should be keeping it cool. The radiator was replaced within the last year, and the coolant has been topped off, so neither of those are the issue.

 

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!

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I drove through Utah at 115f for a week crisscrossing the southern parks, a/c on full, needle pretty much stayed locked at about 3/4, maybe higher, never deviated, never boiled over. In winter the needle hovers at about 1/4, and below 0 I put cardboard in front of the rad to keep heat in.

 

250k miles, runs like a champion.

 

If you are really concerned add some "water wetter" directly to your coolant (not the overflow).

 

Sent from my HTC6535LVW using Tapatalk

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Something isn't right... You shouldn't be 'overheating' in 100 degrees, driving normally by a long shot. All the Nissan trucks/SUVs I owned had perfectly adequate cooling systems, usually to the point they warm up slowly in the winter.

Are you sure the cooling system is properly burped? Check the temperature sensor to see what the output range is (not sure of the value, I'm sure it is in the FSM), and check the radiator for obstructions and inside to see if any scale is developing.

 

B

 

Range is 70-90 ohms at 140 degrees, 21-24 ohms at 212 degrees and is the one closest to the front of the vehicle, on the side of the casting front and center of the engine.

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Thermostat going, water pump or radiator could be clogged. That and possible air in system. Get the FSM and follow Precise instructions. He knows the 3.0 better than me.

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One of the 2 times WhiteOwl ever overheated on me was due to the clutch fan failing (the other was due to a junk radiatior that was missing a majority of its cores :lol: ).

If start with where B pointed you... Make sure the system is blead of air well (I always like to park on an incline or put the front end up on stands, helps force the air out), check for good flow. Save additives as a last ditch effort...

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Mine would get hot driving up grades, especially with the a.c. on. Last week I pulled the radiator and had it rodded out and cleaned. Much better. But basics first, make sure there it's coolant in it. And precise is spot on. You can remove the radiator cap and see if there is scale in the tank, I've seen gauge senders give false readings etc. I'm betting on the radiator being plugged by how you've described this. Cost me $85 to have it cleaned but I had to take it out and bring it to him.

 

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

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Yep, quite a few things could be the culprit, and certainly more than one is possible. I just listed where I would start... Chasing a heating issue that is only caused by a faulty temp sender would be embarrassing though. I just tossed out where I would start (free, test, easy and cheap). Plenty of people know the basics of cooling systems and the VG30 (VG33) isn't any radical change from that.

Got to start somewhere though...

 

So today I was drove about 15 miles on the freeway in around 100-103 degree (Fahrenheit) weather. Going to my destination I had the AC running on full, but when I was about a mile away I turned it off as the needle on the car was ap

proaching the danger zone.

This is why I didn't mention fan clutch before, from my experience they are only the issue at lower speeds. I'd much rather it is a burp or sender issue. :D

 

FYI, in a pinch, when overheating, open the windows (obviously) and turn on the heater full blast. This will help dissipate heat and be uncomfortable...

 

B


 

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Thank you so much for everyone's responses! I'm glad to hear that this isn't normal, but at the same time that just means one more thing for me to look into... Well she's going in bright and early tomorrow morning for new brakes and to get everything realigned, so I'll look into the problem later this week!

 

Thanks again everybody!

Edited by Bobsteriffic
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Same here, but as others have mentioned there are other things to check as well.

I 100% agree (along with all the other checks mentioned-don't blindly throw parts at it!), just bluntly stating the cooling issues I personally had :aok:
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  • 3 weeks later...

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