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Precise1

Air Lift 1000 leveling air bags

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Ok, before I forget, I helped a friend install these a few weeks ago.

http://www.airliftcompany.com/shop/60742/

 

They can be bought from Amazon, Jegs and Summit Racing for about $80 and you get everything you need for installation, plumbed in either tandem or individually. Let me try to hit on installation key notes.

*You need to unbolt the rear shocks (bottom only), unclip the brake flex line, jack up the rear of the vehicle and support it on jack stands high enough that the axle can be in full droop and still be about 6" off of the ground.

*We used spring compressors at this point, but we determined if you simply unbolt the sway bar, you should be able to articulate the rear axle enough to manually remove and install the springs. You would probably want to unbolt the sway bar first, before jacking, but I'm not sure.

*Clock mark the coil springs, seats and isolators, then remove the coil springs.

*Remove the bump stops (they are inside of the coil spring, and have a socket head cap screw dead center IIRC)

*Drill a 3/4" hole in the center of the bottom cup. There is already a small hole to chase, so that makes it easier. You will want the hole this size due to the clamp you need to use and that the bags don't center perfectly.

*Deburr the hole very well. Do not skimp on this step and do the underside as well as you can also.

*Place one clamp on the hose, push the hose on the inlet barb of the air bag, slide the air bag into the coil spring, guide the air hose through the the drilled hole and replace the coil spring and air bag assembly. Do not forget to clock everything as marked.

*Cut about 1' of air line off of the supplied roll, and follow the previous step for the remaining air bag.

*Route the air lines as you see fit, there are plenty of things to guide it and tie off to with the cable ties.

 

We ran the line from the passenger side over to the drivers side, T it there, then run it up to the plastic lip of the bumper right near the driver's corner. Drill a 1/4" hole in the plastic lip, fit the hose and clamp on the barbed end of the schrader valve, then thread through the hole and tighten in place with the lock washers and nuts, leaving about 1/2 inch protruding.

It was a pretty clean install with the valve pointing straight down; out of the way and almost invisible but easily accessable.

If you do T the lines to one valve, the brass T will not need clamps as it is a extremely tight fit. You will want to hear the air hose with boiling water or a heat gun to make it pliable enough to get it on the barbs.

 

The system seems to be durable and effective, even being low pressure (35psi max) My friend has installed a trailer hitch and a motorcycle carrier that he uses for his dirt bike which is about 230lbs cantalevered out about 2 feet from the bumper. He fills them with 10-15 lbs with a bike pump in seconds and he swears he can't even tell there is anything on back, there is no sag, sway or bounce.

 

The hard core wheelers/flex junkies won't want this set up, but if you fill your rig with a lot of butt, gear and/or tow, this is a really cheap, easy, effective and adjustable set up.

 

Sorry, no pictures. Any questions?

 

B

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Btw if anyone wants a pair of these ARB airbags I have some ready to go.

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Haha just bought this for mine since I tow a 19 foot boat.

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Precise, about how long did it take to install?

Did you use a lift or do it on the ground?

Edited by Alkorahil

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When I was running stock suspension, I regularly used the Airlft 1000 bags, and they were an excellent solution to sagging when I towed my boat. When I installed the 2" lift, the stiffer springs negated the need for the airbags, and now they are just glorified bumpstops. I still highly recommend them.

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Precise, about how long did it take to install?

Did you use a lift or do it on the ground?

Installation of the airbags themselves is not too much different than installing new rear springs. You do need to get the rear suspension to fully droop, since you have to take the springs out to drill the lower spring pan to accommodate the air line, and you also need to fit the airbags inside the springs. So, that means at least jackstands and a floorjack are needed.

 

Probably the most time-consuming part is routing the air lines so that there's a convenient location to inflate them. I installed the inflation valve on the panhard rod bracket inside the left rear wheelwell, where it's relatively easy to access, since I didn't want to drill into the body or bumper.

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Installation of the airbags themselves is not too much different than installing new rear springs. You do need to get the rear suspension to fully droop, since you have to take the springs out to drill the lower spring pan to accommodate the air line, and you also need to fit the airbags inside the springs. So, that means at least jackstands and a floorjack are needed.

 

Probably the most time-consuming part is routing the air lines so that there's a convenient location to inflate them. I installed the inflation valve on the panhard rod bracket inside the left rear wheelwell, where it's relatively easy to access, since I didn't want to drill into the body or bumper.

So how many hours did it take you do you think?

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Haha just bought this for mine since I tow a 19 foot boat.

I'll bet they do the job well enough. :aok:

 

Precise, about how long did it take to install?

Did you use a lift or do it on the ground?

It took 2 hours in a home garage on a slab with a floor jack and jack stands with no power tools (other than drill).

We were in no rush, he isn't a mechanic, it was his garage and there was much hunting for drill bits, sockets, etc. I told him next time he brings it over to my place... :D:

A mechanic with knowledge, tools and a lift should take an hour unless there is rust or some issue. We didn't even remove the tires.

 

B

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I'll bet they do the job well enough. :aok:

 

It took 2 hours in a home garage on a slab with a floor jack and jack stands with no power tools (other than drill).

We were in no rush, he isn't a mechanic, it was his garage and there was much hunting for drill bits, sockets, etc. I told him next time he brings it over to my place... :D:

A mechanic with knowledge, tools and a lift should take an hour unless there is rust or some issue. We didn't even remove the tires.

 

B

 

thanks, good to know!

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When I was running stock suspension, I regularly used the Airlft 1000 bags, and they were an excellent solution to sagging when I towed my boat. When I installed the 2" lift, the stiffer springs negated the need for the airbags, and now they are just glorified bumpstops. I still highly recommend them.

How long did you use them? Any issues?

Funny enough, I suspect with no pressure in them they would be better than the stock bump stops, being progressive with compression and all.

 

Installation of the airbags themselves is not too much different than installing new rear springs. You do need to get the rear suspension to fully droop, since you have to take the springs out to drill the lower spring pan to accommodate the air line, and you also need to fit the airbags inside the springs. So, that means at least jackstands and a floorjack are needed.

 

Probably the most time-consuming part is routing the air lines so that there's a convenient location to inflate them. I installed the inflation valve on the panhard rod bracket inside the left rear wheelwell, where it's relatively easy to access, since I didn't want to drill into the body or bumper.

Yes, exactly...

 

We found the most time consuming thing was drilling the hole and deburring it. I recommend using the smallest drill possible and first a 3/8 or 1/2" drill bit, then stepping up. A rat tail file, flat file, cold chisel and champher bit will do a good job. You don't want any sharp edges...

 

We ran the air line around the brake line over to the T at the other side, then up to the unibody, back and down to the plastic bumper lip.

Regardless, not a hard install at all...

 

B

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I don't recall exactly how long I used the AirLift 1000 bags before I installed the AC 2" lift, but it was probably around 3 years. Even 12+ years later, the airbags are in good condition, except like I said, they've been serving just as inflatable bumpstops. I configured them so they no longer hold pressure (ie. I detached the air hoses).

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I have the ac springs in back and a 1.25 inch spacer. I didn't think of that when I ordered my airlift. But I did email the air lift company and there is a kit that is 3 inches taller for the exact same price. Part number 60810. I'll go get the new parts and see how well it works.

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Hello All,

 

It is not really necessary to disassemble the springs or anything to install the Air Lift 1000. With the suspension "drooping" you can first cut and then remove the remaining piece of the rubber stop at the top with a socket wrench (I think 12mm) and then enlarge the hole on the lower spring pan using a Dremel tool or something similar that can be inserted between the coil turns. After the hole is enlarged to at least 3/4" (larger is better to be on the safe side) and properly finished to a very smooth surface, you can insert the airbags and proceed to route the air lines. ;-)

 

JC

Edited by JayCee

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These air bags are hard plastic, 4" in diameter.

 

60774-air-lift-1000.jpg

 

How could you get them inside the spring without removing it? :scratchhead:

 

B

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I love mine, keep them at about 10ish psi around town.

I have the on board compressor to adjust on the fly.

 

But I've noticed under hard flex I hear air leaking from the lines.... :shrug:

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These air bags are hard plastic, 4" in diameter.

60774-air-lift-1000.jpg

How could you get them inside the spring without removing it? :scratchhead:

 

 

 

 

 

Hello B,

 

Actually they do collapse. You remove the cap they come with and you can kneel on them to deflate them. Then you put the cap back on once you have flattened them out and you work them between the coils. I thought I would need something blunt to push them through (I was considering a wooden spoon so as not to damage them), but I was able to insert them without any help. Once in the coil (stem downwards) you remove the cap again and they expand.

 

If you look up "Air Lift 1000 install" in Youtube, there are several videos that show you how.

 

I should mention this installation method was not my idea but came from an amazon.com customer.

 

Best regards,

 

JC

Edited by JayCee

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Neat trick, I didn't think of that, but didn't you remove the bump stop too? I guess you could do that without removing the coil as well, but it seems like it would be a pain. You must not have drilled out the bottom hole then?

I guess it comes down to what tools and equpiment you have and how you prefer to go about it. Thanks for clarifiying that. :beer:

 

B

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Hello B,

 

Please refer to my initial post above: I did enlarge the bottom hole, that is why I used a Dremel tool that fits between the coils. It is somewhat time consuming -it took about half an hour per side- but a lot less cumbersome than removing all the rear suspension.;-) Care must be taken to leave the edges of the enlarged hole with a smooth finish so it doesn't abrade the air lines.

 

BR

 

JC

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Question for those running these.

 

I tore an air line wheeling (ok, maybe prerunning :blush02: ) and the compressor wouldn't stop running till I pulled the fuse.

 

Thats normal right?

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Question for those running these.

 

I tore an air line wheeling (ok, maybe prerunning :blush02: ) and the compressor wouldn't stop running till I pulled the fuse.

 

Thats normal right?

 

If your compressor is controlled by a pressure switch, yeah.

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If your compressor is controlled by a pressure switch, yeah.

 

I don't know if it is since the PO installed it. I figured I would ask here since its the compressor that comes with the kit.

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I don't know if it is since the PO installed it. I figured I would ask here since its the compressor that comes with the kit.

 

Oh, yeah, then it probably has a "low pressure sensor that automatically activates compressor if pressure drops" below 5 or 10 psi.

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^Agreed. Most setups like that have an automatic pressure sensor since there are always possibilities of small leaks, especially under load or towing, which is exactly when you don't want your suspension to sag. Sounds like it is working as it should, and good thing that you pulled the fuse, it would have happily run until it burned it's self out...

 

B

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Thats what I thought too. Now to just fix the lines....

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This is exactly what I need! Good info.

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