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What did you do to your Pathfinder today?


RedRider3141
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I have no idea what a vortex fuel saver is, but yes it's a voltage stabilizer.

 

I have gathered from previous posts that you are electrically illiterate so I can spell it out for you if needed.

 

A voltage stabilizer is essentially a capacitor bank with some filters in it.

 

In electronics a capacitors job is to be able to charge to full (99%) within 5 time constants each time constant accounts for 63.2% of the total charge, and then 63.2% of the remaining difference. It can then discharge itself (near) instantly to maintain a voltage level in a circuit.

 

A capacitor by nature will resist a change in voltage, and whatever the normal running voltage of the vehicle under charge (14.4V) will likewise be the charge placed on the capacitor. When the voltage level drops from 14.4V to a lower state due to overloading the electrical circuit, the capacitor will then discharge itself to maintain that voltage level.

 

This means that when you flick on your large rooftop lights, or auxiliary reverse lamps, and your stereo (with amplifier and woofer) is playing, the voltage level will drop with a factory alternator because adequate current cannot be supplied. The vehicles electrical system will then draw from the battery under the hood to make up the difference and this is exactly what we DON'T want. This is exactly why the headlights will dim with each positive current spike.

The total effective voltage of the circuit will drop below 14.4V and this is where the capacitor bank (voltage stabilizer) comes in. It will discharge itself to maintain the over-all circuit voltage at exactly 14.4V without drawing from the vehicle battery or lowering the effective voltage. This means that even when the woofer bass note hits, and your running lights are on, and your rooftop lights are on, etc., the current spike will be accounted for by the discharging capacitor bank.

 

It does work, obviously, as it is used in nearly every electronic and electrical circuit that I can think of. It bypasses (to a certain extent) needing to upgrade your alternator while still adding more electrical devices to your vehicle. Voltage drop spikes are not good for your vehicles electrical system and especially the ECU. If the ecu does not have full voltage, then the internal electronics will not function as well and your vehicle will suffer in performance due to the added current draw and negative voltage spikes.

Also, when the input voltage to the ecu drops below its recommended voltage, that means more current has to be drawn to make up the same amount of total power (watts) [volts x amps = watts], which means it could be drawing more current than it is rated for, at any rate, it is something to avoid.

Edited by Nefarious
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LOL

 

I have gathered from previous posts that you are electrically illiterate so I can spell it out for you if needed.

Not as badly as you think apparently... :D

 

Sorry, I wasn't trying to call you out, but I don't see a lot of evidence of voltage stabilizers making a car run better. :shrug:

 

 

This means that when you flick on your large rooftop lights, or auxiliary reverse lamps, and your stereo (with amplifier and woofer) is playing, the voltage level will drop with a factory alternator because adequate current cannot be supplied

 

This means that even when the woofer bass note hits, and your running lights are on, and your rooftop lights are on, etc., the current spike will be accounted for by the discharging capacitor bank

Which is why audio guys install dedicated capacitors, no?

Not a 'woofer' here so my lights nor audio dim... :shrug:

 

 

I pulled the ARB and is measurificating!

 

 

B

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No problem, just spreading valid information on the topic.

 

A voltage stabilizer installed on the cars main electrical system (at the battery) will protect the entire system. It is tied into the alternator of the vehicle and the battery of the vehicle so that all of the spikes are accounted for (turning on large aux. lights, 12v coffee maker, power inverter).

 

When nearly any electronic device is turned on, there is a current spike. When you have more and more appliances adding up, then trust me, the spikes are there. My truck is being setup as a long distance expedition vehicle with on-board air, on-board water system, gps navigation, logging computer, 12v coffee maker, auxiliary interior lights, etc.. It is vital to maintain an even circuit voltage over the entire system as well as eliminate the inherent noise.

 

A large power capacitor will work as well, as you mentioned, but having a 0.5 or 1 Farad capacitor in your vehicle is pretty extreme, and also dangerous. It also has very selective frequency filtration for cleaning up the DC line. You do NOT want to short out a 1 Farad cap as it would likely kill you.

 

An added benefit is the fact that the bank of capacitors will be made up of multiple farad rated caps in parallel which act as a very effective filter to eliminate a wide spectrum of the frequency range of AC electrical noise on the DC line. The more pure the DC voltage in the vehicle, the better the electronics will function.

 

Don't get me wrong, they aren't a vital part of the system, I didn't even install it (it came with the truck). I am however happy it is there for the application that I am using it for and you plan to run your electrical system to the max, it IS a worthwhile investment.

 

Vortex fuel savers... I cannot comment on this. haha

Edited by Nefarious
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Beat on the driver's side rear cailper for 35 minutes with heat and wd40. Caliper is stuck to the inside and not even the little 4lb hammer I have can move the thing....sooo pulled the old pads off of the right side and stuffed one in the left and put in three new pads. And once again I hate salt more than anything else on planet earth right now.... Quebec....dammit.

 

Sent from my SGH-T999V using Tapatalk

 

 

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Please, don't ever confuse WD-40 with a penetrating oil, it is a Water Displacement formula that also serves as a light duty oil and sticker remover. Use something like PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench, Kroil, etc. or you might as well just save the WD-40 and just pee on it. Seriously!

Penetrating oil may not have worked in your application (sounds rusted solid), but you didn't give it a real chance either.

 

B

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Thanks guys, I didn't really give the pin a chance Friday but i showed up late aaaand everthing else went downhill from there. I'll be getting a triangular file and PB Blaster at Canadian Tire later today and take another run at the pin.

 

Sent from my SGH-T999V using Tapatalk

 

 

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FINALLY ORDERED MY ECU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! My god!!!! it was ridiculous trying to find that thing. My wallet hates NAPA, I did not under any circumstances order it from there, but they were going to charge $388 for a refurb. I ordered one from eBay for $80, but it was a California Emmisions blah blah something or another. Finally found one this morning on eBay, the exact one I need. $159, be here on wed. I miss my damn Pathy. I know the guy that posted the part sold it so fast he is probably in the JY hunting his gold mine he think he found. So I am excited to get my rust bucket back on the road.

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WD40 now has several different formulas, agreed the original WD40 we all know is a water displacer, but they do have a new rust penetrate spray.

That is silly! WD-40 is a specific formula (where the 40 comes from). You can't just change the formula and put WD-40 on it because it isn't! Call it WD-52 or whatever... P...

 

I walked around my Pathy to get to the mini fridge in the garage.

I drove the wife's Pathy to go get groceries... :tongue:

 

B

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My can of WD says " stop squeaks-protects metal-loosens rusted parts-frees sticky mechanisms" on the front and "lubricates, cleans, protects, penetrates, and displaces moisture" on the back. I wouldn't depend on it as a rust penetrant though. Better stuff available.

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Got the Thorleys on today, Was a bigger PITA than I even imagined. Kid sized hands would have made things a lot easier..... Taking Monday off to get the Magnaflow cat and muffler installed. Now to start fabricating the front bumper.

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On my flight home I was going over in my head all the weird things my engine is doing. Then I thought to myself "you know, just because the timing marks all line up doesn't necessarily mean its really in time..." Crank key way. Duh! So tomorrow I'm going to tear the front down and have a look-see.

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Out of curiosity have you ever serviced the auto locking hubs? They can get pretty nasty over the years. A good clean and lube might just be all it needs, otherwise I would say its the cvs....these diffs are pretty durable. I don't think I've ever seen a problem with a front diff (on a stock truck without front locker)

 

I did tear into the driver's side hub a week or so ago (came half engaged while driving, scared the hell out of me), and cleaned it out/stuck it back on. The brake rings were worn past tolerance so I didn't bother with the other side and just planned to order manuals. It's entirely likely that they're screwed (and I haven't heard of R200A failures either), I'm just trying to figure out what they'd be binding on. Could be the CVs (they've had a tough couple of weeks), but I'd expect it to pull pretty bad to one side of one of them bound up somehow. :shrug:

 

Your guess is as good as mine though, the mechanic hasn't found anything yet.

 

No time for Pathy work today anyway... my friend's Astro munched a head gasket, so we tore into that. Of course none of us had taken an engine apart before. What better engine to start with than a 4.3l covered with spring clamps, proprietary hose clips, and little easter eggs from the PO, that you have to work on through a hole in the floor? :ohmy:

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That is silly! WD-40 is a specific formula (where the 40 comes from). You can't just change the formula and put WD-40 on it because it isn't! Call it WD-52 or whatever... P...

 

I walked around my Pathy to get to the mini fridge in the garage.

I drove the wife's Pathy to go get groceries... :tongue:

 

B

I guess WD40 is just a name now:

 

http://www.wd40specialist.com/

 

 

The water resistant silicone spray works excellent in locks I can safely say.

Edited by ahardb0dy
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I tried (unsuccessfully) to get into my truck through about 1/2" of ice. Frozen doors, windows, and locks means I have to work from home today (oh, darn :D ). Come on - this is NASHVILLE, not <insert insanely cold northern city here>.

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My rear wiper works only here and there. The fluid never has even though the pump does, I can't find where it's clogged either. Oh well I have bigger problems to fix first LOL..

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If you guys are up on my work, you know I busted all my knuckles and forearms are bruised installing the Thorley headers this last weekend. I let it sit for 24+ hours only because I used some copper laced silicone as a thinly skimmed coating on all the gaskets. I drove it this morning to work, noticing no difference in sound but a bit of throttle necessity difference. I dropped it off at a local muffler shop and had the Magnaflow cat and Gibson exhaust installed. I was expecting a louder, obnoxious sound. Not the case. What I did find was a quiet rumble, but a smoother acceleration without more pedal movement. It used to take more throttle to achieve momentum but now it seems to not struggle to come to speed and keeps the speed not much off idle, shifts earlier and feels like the engine is not working as hard, I think this will show a much better MPG and when needed some extra HPs. It was definitely worth to effort and money to have a more efficient motor.... Rock on.

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