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Front Wheel Bearing Retainer Plate Tool


keithb7
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I am trying to replace the front rotors, calipers and pads on my 1993 WD21 4x4.

I cannot find the correct deep socket type tool to remove the bearing cover plate.

I went to my local auto parts store and could not locate the right one. The closest

I think is this one from OTC. See here:

 

OTC Tool

 

I would have to order this in, as they had no stock at any of their 100 stores

here in Western Canada. Plus they want like $68 for it, plus tax.

What did you use to remove the bearing plate? I could use some advice. Something

that will accept a torque wrench would be preferred as I want to apply the correct

amount of bearing pre-load on reassembly.

 

Here is where I am stuck. You can see I need a tool with only 2 pins.

8431_158249797159_518847159_3634445_3448034_n.jpg

 

Any help appreciated. Thanks, Keith

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Them me telling you I used a flathead screwdriver and carefully tapped it without an issue (3 times so far) was going to drop small welds on a socket but since the beering grease keeps them easy to move I just tapped it off.

 

Okay bearing grease; but beering grease sounds better

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You can use OTC 7270A and grind two of the tabs off. That part is probably more readily available and cheaper.

I believe there is a thread about this also.

 

Them me telling you I used a flathead screwdriver and carefully tapped it without an issue

Same here, several times. No problems... :shrug:

 

Also, make sure to double check them after 20 miles or so, you may need to reset them.

 

B

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Heres my writeup i did on 4x4parts.com on 9/25/05.

 

i cant remember the size i bought and its not marked on the socket...but it was 1 of the 3 that the advance autoparts had here...it was the 4 prong they had for a chevy i think and i took the locknut with me to see which 1 i could make work... when i held the locknut on top of the socket you i saw if i used the dremel tool to take 2 prongs off and file 1/4 the thickness of each of the remaining prongs and cut a camber on each that it would fit pretty nicely... attached are the before modification...after modification and with wheelbearing locknut resting flush against it...the socket cost me about $6 and took about 10 or 15 mins to grind w/ the dremel....

2050078_20_full.jpg

 

2050078_21_full.jpg

 

 

2050078_22_full.jpg

Edited by unccpathfinder
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I downloaded and read the actual manual. It states to initially torque to about 125 ft lbs or so. Then back it off

and re-torque to about 7 lbs I think it was. So I thought, why not try and remove with a screwdriver tip or an allen wrench.

With only 7 lbs on it, it should come off easily. It did. No tool required for dis-assembly. I believe they want 125 lbs just to set the bearing in place. Then remove torque and re set at only 7 lbs. No need for a special tool for this. 2 drill bits and a hammer handle works fine to crank up and set the bearing in place. Back off tension, set by hand, then tap it slightly tight with a screwdriver and hammer. 7 lbs is not much. It all went back together with out any special tool. Upon researching this I don't think any special ordered or fabricated tools are required. We'll see I suppose. I re-packed the bearings but re-used he inner wheel seals. They looked great, besides my wife never takes the Pathfinder 20 mins beyond home. I am not overly concerned about wheel seals and bearings with these short trips. It's a second vehicle and only gets used in the winter. Thanks for your comments everyone. I too am now a firm believer in the old "2 screwdrivers" trick.

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I'd rather know my bearings are seated properly and spend the $6 on a tool that will allow me to do that b/c I'd really ahte to have a bearing seize up doing 70 on the highway or have it beat out the races and have to go through replacing the races/bearings when I would have to buy a race puller and then spend the $6 for the correct tool (or be ignorant and do it the way that got me in the messed up situation to begin with) plus the cost of the bearings/races...but each to their own...i'll take shortcuts but somethings I just don't think it's worth it and wheel bearings are one of them

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  • 1 year later...

Heres my writeup i did on 4x4parts.com on 9/25/05.

i cant remember the size i bought and its not marked on the socket...but it was 1 of the 3 that the advance autoparts had here...it was the 4 prong they had for a chevy i think and i took the locknut with me to see which 1 i could make work... when i held the locknut on top of the socket you i saw if i used the dremel tool to take 2 prongs off and file 1/4 the thickness of each of the remaining prongs and cut a camber on each that it would fit pretty nicely... attached are the before modification...after modification and with wheel bearing locknut resting flush against it...the socket cost me about $6 and took about 10 or 15 mins to grind w/ the dremel....

I just finished modding a tool myself, so I thought I would add the size specs for others.

 

 

 

In my case it was..

 

wd21nissanspindlesocket.jpg

 

Performance Tool

4 PIin, 2.375" Outer

Spindle Nut

W1271

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