Jump to content

Due to a hardware failure on the hosts systems, all posts and messages created between May 26th and Jan 13th have been lost. Additionally, if you joined the NPORA Forums community during that time, you'll need to re-register. -NPORA Mod Team *Updated: 05/19/2022 12:15AM PST

Welders and the related


Nytrosfinder
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ok so its time that I get thinking about getting my rocker panel fixed and my floor pan. Gonna need a welder so my dad and I are splitting the costs of one. I am wondering what would be a good welder to start with that works off regular house voltage,110V, can weld frames, sheet metal, and other things(1/16"-1/4"). I know from a friend that a MIG is one of the easiest to learn on and they are good for sheet metal and body work. He recommended that I definably go with a Lincoln welder that does at least 200 amps. I just need to know which welder for a fair price would be a good buy...

 

Any and all suggestions would be greatly appreciated...

 

(and if they sell it at a store that I could go get it at that would be great as well!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I need something that will work... i dont wanna have to pull my stove out to have to access the 220v outlet and get yelled at by mom... scary... very scary thing....

 

 

i would go find a new pathfinder with less or no rust.... then move my stuff over to the new one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For sheet metal, you'll want MIG, my little flux core 110v 80amp unit blows holes in thin metal.

 

we got one of those from harbor freight for $87 cause of this huge sale they had the other day.... returned it cause like you said mig is better....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, if you want a decent quality welder that actually welds nice, I have been super impressed with this thing.

 

Hobart Handler 187

 

While I don't actually own one, my cousin does. I'm just very impressed at the way it welds thin sheet metal with ease, and at the same time it'a capable of welding 3/16" efficiently and with good penetration. It's also relatively cheap and has good brand support (made by Miller in fact).

 

Granted, it's 230 volt, but anything with any power tends to be. My own shop has an Airco Dip-pack 200 (made by ESAB) mig welder and while it welds thicker metal like butter and has a 60% duty cycle at max capacity, the Handler 187 is far more user friendly and lays some really nice beads. Of course I prefer tig welding my sheetmetal whenever possible (Miller 250DX), but that's just me. It's slow, but the reduction of HAZ and minimal grinding make it worthwhile for me.

 

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

anybody have expericne with the rediwelder 12v DC welders?

Yep. Freakin amazing. With 12v, you can weld sheet. 24V (2 batteries) you can weld 1/2" no problem. 36V (3 batteries) you can apparently (have not tried it myself) weld 3/4".

 

I've used it both at home, and on the trail. Outstanding.

 

 

Trailchaser on here uses one, and is also a distributor of them. He's got a bunch of YouTube videos of his in action. I've only got one, and here it is....

 

name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="
type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>" wmode="transparent" style="width:400px; height:326px;" id="VideoPlayback" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" flashvars="">
Link to comment
Share on other sites

whatever you do, do not get a 110 V machine. you will not be happy with the power, the control, or the finished product.

 

if your gonna go bling bling, get a machine that can do both Tig and arc. Then you can tig your body pannels back together, and you have the versatility of arc. (stick)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

in my opnion 110v units i wouldnt trust the penetration on them on 1/4 inch material. If you do get a 110v make sure its a gas unit because youll have much better welds then that of one without. i have a 220v stick welder and love it have had no problems with any penetration or anything. i would stray away from the 110v units especially if your gonna be doing heavy material and expect it to hold well

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:rolleyes:

 

 

I weld 1/4" all the time with my 110v flux core, works good, takes a while if doing a lot of welds (crappy duty cycle), but it makes a fine weld. I just used it to reweld some hinges on a couple of 500lbs dumpster gates (steel tube with wood slats). :aok:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing is that I am also fairly new to the welding world. Only had my hands on practicing welding about 6-7 times...

 

I got a friend who has his welding certification who is gonna teach me and guide me while i do my body floor panels.

 

And no I am not gonna jump right to welding my floor pan, got some scraps to practice on first....

 

The other thing is I don't wanna end up spending $1k on a welder that I wont be great on to start with... remember you gotta start simple first...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The other thing is I don't wanna end up spending $1k on a welder that I wont be great on to start with... remember you gotta start simple first...

 

Exactly, get a 110v Lincoln wire feed Mig. You can get a good one for under $400 and be able to do what you need. No need for a stick welder or 220v for sheet metal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

Welcome to NPORA Forums

 

Please register to gain full access to the forum.

Make sure you read the Forum Guidelines and don't forget to post a new intro in the New People Start Here! section, to say hi too everyone.

 

-NPORA

×
×
  • Create New...