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LSD for 2005 Pathfinder with 10 bolt ringear, 31 spline.


gkphoto
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Hi Folks,
I hope this note finds you all in good health in these strange times.
I am new to Nissan Pathfinder and this forum and I appreciate any advice that you can offer.
I am converting a 2005 R51 Pathfinder LE to all electric. I intend to bypass the electronic AWD feature and install a mechanical LSD of some kind into the rear differential. The existing rear end has independent suspension, a ten bolt ring gear, and 31 spline. (Once I do the rear diff, I plan to add an LSD to the front axle as well.)
I cannot find an off-the-shelf LSD to fit this machine. Can anyone point me to some appropriate hardware, or perhaps a reliable shop that could assist me with this plan?
FYI, a few years back I converted a Chev S10 4X4 to all electric, and added LSDs to both front and rear axles. Ten years later its still working fine. Was much easier sourcing hardware for that vehicle than for the Nissan.
Any suggestions?
Thanks in advance,
gkphoto
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Just to make sure we have the main goal in mind here, I've interpreted "bypass[ing] the electronic AWD feature" as meaning you're looking to bypass whatever software-driven traction system you've got (ABS, VDC, TCS, ABLS, etc.) on the truck with a mechanical LSD.  If so, my quick response would be that if you can find a suitable LSD, bypassing any system wouldn't be necessary: the system would just be supplemental to the device's functions.  That is, the system would only kick in after it determined that a LSD (if it existed) was allowing enough slip to satisfy detection logic via sensors.

 

Otherwise, if you do mean to bypass AWD, you may need to expand on what function you're referring to.  The All-Mode system on the truck already has the means to bypass the mode simply by turning the dial to 2WD, but that option seems out of context to the questions.

 

Either way, I'd just focus on the LSD part for now, if that's what you're really after.

 

Admittedly, I don't know much about R51, but I can infer enough just from FSM data (https://www.nicoclub.com/nissan-service-manuals) and part numbers.  Follow along...

  • The 2005 FSM indicates you've got an R200 rear final drive.
  • A parts cross-reference indicates that the side gears in your differential (38423-0C000 -> 38423-0C00A) are also used in 2003-2008 350Z cars and 2005-2010 Frontiers, Xterras, and Pathfinders.  That means the splining between those vehicles are the same.
  • The differential carrier (38421-0C000) for those trucks were all the same, and since the Frontier and Xterra have C200 rear axles, and yours has an R200 rear, it means those differentials are the same.  (R200/C200 compatibility was also true on pre-MY05 trucks/SUVs/cars, but MY05+ R200/C200 are different from pre-MY05 versions.)
  • From prior research just the other week, I can also confirm that the C200 open carrier from a 2.5L D40 Frontier is the same as a 350Z, and they too shared the same side gear.
  • All the above vehicles use the same carrier bearings.  I presume more parts to be identical.

The end result is that, in theory, all the differentials from 2003-2008 350Z and 2005-2010 Frontiers, Xterras, and Pathfinders with R200 rear diffs (G35, R51) or C200 rear diffs (D40, N40) are all interchangeable.

 

If that's true, a Quaife QDF13L LSD for 2003-08 350Z/G35 with VLSD should work in the truck.  My full technical assessment is available here: https://www.clubfrontier.org/threads/rear-axel-swap.368234/post-3903321, but the abstract that's relevant here is:

 

Quote

For that discussion, it's highly plausible that a 350Z LSD will fit a C200-equipped D40, simply because I can confirm the 2.5L D40 used the exact same open carrier housing and side gears as the 350Z. The C200 and C200K are subtly different, but appear to use the same 31-spline by 32.0mm according to ARB. I show the Quaife QDF13L for 2003-08 350Z/G35 with VLSD as being 31-spline by 33.0mm, though the latter dimension reads like a bore ID, and not a spline OD. I would chance that the 350Z Quaife would fit an 05+ C200 or C200K with little fitment issue...though, all those differentials and axle shafts may involve the use (or non-use) of circlips (compression clips), which could ultimately be an issue, particularly if the clip depth is different. It's also worth noting that VLSD applications use different housings designed for fluid flow to support the "viscous" portion of the LSD. Putting the VLSD unit into an non-VLSD housing may reduce its effectiveness.

 

If you decide to read into that post further, please enjoy my bashing of some idiot.  There's also some technical "talk" about what Nissan calls a system versus what said-idiot calls a device, just to clear up the differences in traction systems and devices.

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Patrick,

 

Thanks again for getting back to me. See my response in purple type......

 

Just to make sure we have the main goal in mind here, I've interpreted "bypass[ing] the electronic AWD feature" as meaning you're looking to bypass whatever software-driven traction system you've got (ABS, VDC, TCS, ABLS, etc.) on the truck with a mechanical LSD.  If so, my quick response would be that if you can find a suitable LSD, bypassing any system wouldn't be necessary: the system would just be supplemental to the device's functions.  That is, the system would only kick in after it determined that a LSD (if it existed) was allowing enough slip to satisfy detection logic via sensors.

 

Otherwise, if you do mean to bypass AWD, you may need to expand on what function you're referring to.  The All-Mode system on the truck already has the means to bypass the mode simply by turning the dial to 2WD, but that option seems out of context to the questions.

 

I am converting the Pathfinder to all-electric drive….so no engine and no transmission. (I am using a dedicated direct-drive gear-reduction unit instead of a transmission for this project....see https://www.torquetrends.com/ev-torquebox.) I don’t expect the Nissan AWD system and the ABS traction-control system will work without data from that equipment. If it does, your remarks above make good sense. Will be interesting to find out.

 

Either way, I'd just focus on the LSD part for now, if that's what you're really after.

 

Yes, that is what I am interested in. I would like to have a stand-alone analog LSD ‘device’ available full-time for regular 2WD operation.

 

Admittedly, I don't know much about R51, but I can infer enough just from FSM data (https://www.nicoclub.com/nissan-service-manuals) and part numbers.  Follow along...

  • The 2005 FSM indicates you've got an R200 rear final drive.
  • A parts cross-reference indicates that the side gears in your differential (38423-0C000 -> 38423-0C00A) are also used in 2003-2008 350Z cars and 2005-2010 Frontiers, Xterras, and Pathfinders.  That means the splining between those vehicles are the same.
  • The differential carrier (38421-0C000) for those trucks were all the same, and since the Frontier and Xterra have C200 rear axles, and yours has an R200 rear, it means those differentials are the same.  (R200/C200 compatibility was also true on pre-MY05 trucks/SUVs/cars, but MY05+ R200/C200 are different from pre-MY05 versions.)
  • From prior research just the other week, I can also confirm that the C200 open carrier from a 2.5L D40 Frontier is the same as a 350Z, and they too shared the same side gear.
  • All the above vehicles use the same carrier bearings. I presume more parts to be identical.

The end result is that, in theory, all the differentials from 2003-2008 350Z and 2005-2010 Frontiers, Xterras, and Pathfinders with R200 rear diffs (G35, R51) or C200 rear diffs (D40, N40) are all interchangeable.

 

Your analysis seems  reasonable to me. I have recently graduated from thirty years of driving (and repairing) BMW 5 series vehicles of the 1982-1988 vintage. Not many drive train options there, though I converted several of them to manual transmission plus LSD rear ends. (I live in rural Canada – snow and ice constitute 90% of driving difficulties out here.) I even converted one to all-electric drive. But I have to admit I am alarmed at the seemingly arbitrary range of drive-train and differential components that Nissan has generated over a very few years. You, however, seem to have acquired a clear view of this confusion.

 

If that's true, a Quaife QDF13L LSD for 2003-08 350Z/G35 with VLSD should work in the truck.

 

This is just what I want to do. I’ve looked high and low for a Torsen-style LSD for my Pathfinder. I have the differential apart and ready to install the correct LSD components.

Can you think of any further tests I could do to confirm the fitment before I buy the Quaife?

 

Your patience and generosity with advise is greatly appreciated.

 

Cheers,

 

Gerry

 

P.S. One further question…I am starting to think that the front differential on my truck uses the same carrier as the rear. If this is true would the Quaife work in the front application as well?

 

P.S.S. I read the whole of your interaction with that troublesome fellow from the earlier conversation…..

 

"The ‘Dunning–Kruger Effect’ is a cognitive bias in which unskilled people make poor decisions and reach erroneous conclusions, but their incompetence denies them the ability to recognize their mistakes. The unskilled therefore suffer from illusory superiority, rating their ability as above average, much higher than it actually is. Many competent individuals falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding."

 

Source: Why People Fail to Recognize Their Own Incompetence from Current Directions in Psychological Science.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hey Gerry,

 

Ooooooohhh, that "all-electric"!  I totally misinterpreted that.  We've had a 98 Frontier in the family with manual windows, locks, and mirrors and every day for 22+ years I've wanted it to be the other other "all electric" (power windows, etc.).  I was actually researching EV options for that truck a few months ago, too.  Seemed neat, but the costs seem out of my league.  I can only afford to reach across the seat to roll down the window.  Anyway...

 

So now, about the Quaife...I have a modified recommendation: I think the QDF10L is the correct model for your application, not the QDF13L.

 

When I previously dug into this, it was only cursory searching just to shut that guy up (which it didn't, apparently).  Digging a little deeper, I see Quaife has 4 possible replacements for the 350Z, depending on the transmission and the diff type it came came with: 

  • Auto/Open: QDF10L
  • Manual/Open: QDF11L
  • Manual/VLSD: QDF13L
  • Auto/VLSD: QDF18L

The Quaife website has dimensional spec sheets on each model (except the 18L, which just linked to the 10L spec sheet).  The 10L has a 0.4"/10.2mm difference on the "L4" bearing-to-crown-surface measurement vs. the 11L/13L models, which suggests a "carrier break" between gear ratios.  The 2003 350Z FSM shows that the MT has 3.538 (46:13) gears, while the AT has 3.357 (47:14).  That extra pinion tooth (13 vs. 14) is enough to require pushing the ring gear over that extra amount to accommodate the larger pinion head.  The 2005 R51 FSM shows the 4WD ratio as also being 3.357, and sure enough, the ring and pinion set (38100-2C360 -> 38100-0F36A) is the same as used in 2003-09 350Z and 2005-12 R51 (and same years D40 Frontier and 2009-20 370Z).  So, my money's on the QDF10L.

 

My confidence is pretty high just based on the part number cross refs alone, but with your carrier out and the specs online, that should confirm just about everything.  I wouldn't even be surprised if someone else has done this, but I've not searched around for it.

 

Your front diff is a smaller R180A model.  Nissan did use R180A's as front diffs in older W/D21 Pathfinders/Hardbodies, and also as rear diffs in older Z cars (Subaru even used R180s), but it's a longshot they're similar.  My Google-Fu suggests the car diffs were 8-bolt ring gears...not sure about the trucks, but I'll guess there weren't LSD options.  ARB offers two lockers (RD180 and RD181, depending on carrier break) and shows the R180A as being a 10-bolt ring gear with 27-spline shafts at 1.09"/27.8mm.  This "CD52P" LSD from Mother Russia might be just the ticket: https://www.ebay.com/itm/123629507939

 

At this point, I'd say running dual LSDs on that R51 would be pretty slick in itself...but since you're pushing the envelope by going EV...oh man...

 

Speaking very broadly here since I've not worked on an R51 and haven't scoured the FSM (yet?): the removal of the transmission alone will very likely be problematic.  The Transmission Control Module (TCM) provides input signals to practically every system on the truck.  Even if you keep the transfer case, the transfer control unit (TCU) uses TCM data.  I imagine much of this can be bypassed to some degree with some re-wiring (after all, it's just 12v solenoids doing the actual work, with some brains in between to keep anyone from engaging 4L at freeway speeds), so ideally the switch can be wired to provide basic signalling.  To that extent, I use an All-Mode switch from R50/QX4 models to run my air compressor and air lockers...so I'd reasonably expect the R51/D40/N40 switch to be repurposable to signal the transfer case to be in 2H/4H/4L.  But, it's a broad assumption having not looked into it.

 

The brake/traction systems also rely on TCM data.  On the plus side, if the transfer case is similar to the R50 versions (specifically those with All-Mode, including all QX4) then I believe the vehicle speed sensor (VSS) is on the transfer case and not the transmission.  There may be another revolution sensor that might need to be simulated, but you really have to hope that the TCM-to-ECM (Engine Control Module) is not deeply impacted as well.  The ECM in itself will be another problem.  Do you plan to use the gauge cluster, or will you have some other interface/display showing EV-specific data?

 

Of course, everything really all depends on what features/functions/system from the truck you want/need to keep.  My best recommendation there is to list out all those items, download all the FSM chapters for the truck, and review all the system descriptions.  The FSMs do a great job of describing function and indicating which systems/sensors are used and how.  The troubleshooting/diagnostic sections will also provide voltage/resistance data for sensors.  This way, you might be able to gauge which inputs can be simulated by switch and/or resistor to preserve a function, or otherwise trick a control module.

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7 hours ago, gkphoto said:

P.S.S. I read the whole of your interaction with that troublesome fellow from the earlier conversation…..

 

"The ‘Dunning–Kruger Effect’ is a cognitive bias in which unskilled people make poor decisions and reach erroneous conclusions, but their incompetence denies them the ability to recognize their mistakes. The unskilled therefore suffer from illusory superiority, rating their ability as above average, much higher than it actually is. Many competent individuals falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding."

 

Source: Why People Fail to Recognize Their Own Incompetence from Current Directions in Psychological Science. 

 

This is amazing, by the way.  It has a name.

 

This unequivocally sums up my interaction...and it bled over into another post, too.  It was entertaining for a while, but "arguing with a fool only proves that there are two."

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Posted (edited)

Hi Patrick,

 

My response to your thoughtful reply in purple.......

 

Ooooooohhh, that "all-electric"!  I totally misinterpreted that.  We've had a 98 Frontier in the family with manual windows, locks, and mirrors and every day for 22+ years I've wanted it to be the other other "all electric" (power windows, etc.).  I was actually researching EV options for that truck a few months ago, too.  Seemed neat, but the costs seem out of my league.  I can only afford to reach across the seat to roll down the window.  Anyway...

 

I know the feeling...I bought doors with electric windows and power locks from a salvage yard for the Chev S10 conversion. I like comfort.

 

FYI, I am not a wealthy guy, but have learned to do a lot of things over the years (I just turned 71)....I've built buildings, done electrical wiring and plumbing. Know a fair amount of electronics. I've made my living as a professional photographer (See gerrykopelow.com) doing my own film and print processing in-house, been totally digital for about fifteen years. The money for the EV conversions comes from a settlement after a serious car accident. Someone drove into me on the street: Both my legs were badly crushed, four months in hospital, had to learn how to walk again, etc. I am partially disabled but still quite functional, though somewhat slower.

 

Another factor making EV conversions easier and cheaper: Used components from salvaged OEM EV's. Lots of low-mileage EVs get wrapped around trees on account of the high torque available with electric motors in combination with the 'Dunning-Kruger Effect'.. For example, for the Pathfinder conversion I am using two main battery packs from wrecked BMW i3 EVs. This amount of high-tech battery costs today about half of what I paid for battery power ten years ago for the S10 project. Other items like the battery charger are also cheaper. Enthusiasts have worked out the CAN codes for a lot of this OEM hardware, now plentiful on the salvage market.

 

So now, about the Quaife...I have a modified recommendation: I think the QDF10L is the correct model for your application, not the QDF13L.

 

When I previously dug into this, it was only cursory searching just to shut that guy up (which it didn't, apparently).  Digging a little deeper, I see Quaife has 4 possible replacements for the 350Z, depending on the transmission and the diff type it came came with: 

  • Auto/Open: QDF10L
  • Manual/Open: QDF11L
  • Manual/VLSD: QDF13L
  • Auto/VLSD: QDF18L

My learning curve has accelerated as the beneficiary of your experience. I did pick up on the four offerings for the 350Z, but thought the differences were limited to length of the output shafts for the various versions.

 

The Quaife website has dimensional spec sheets on each model (except the 18L, which just linked to the 10L spec sheet).  The 10L has a 0.4"/10.2mm difference on the "L4" bearing-to-crown-surface measurement vs. the 11L/13L models, which suggests a "carrier break" between gear ratios.  The 2003 350Z FSM shows that the MT has 3.538 (46:13) gears, while the AT has 3.357 (47:14).  That extra pinion tooth (13 vs. 14) is enough to require pushing the ring gear over that extra amount to accommodate the larger pinion head.  The 2005 R51 FSM shows the 4WD ratio as also being 3.357, and sure enough, the ring and pinion set (38100-2C360 -> 38100-0F36A) is the same as used in 2003-09 350Z and 2005-12 R51 (and same years D40 Frontier and 2009-20 370Z).  So, my money's on the QDF10L.

 

I will double check all of the above...as you say, I have the parts literally in hand to confirm everything with proper measurements.

 

My confidence is pretty high just based on the part number cross refs alone, but with your carrier out and the specs online, that should confirm just about everything.  I wouldn't even be surprised if someone else has done this, but I've not searched around for it.

 

Your front diff is a smaller R180A model.  Nissan did use R180A's as front diffs in older W/D21 Pathfinders/Hardbodies, and also as rear diffs in older Z cars (Subaru even used R180s), but it's a longshot they're similar.  My Google-Fu suggests the car diffs were 8-bolt ring gears...not sure about the trucks, but I'll guess there weren't LSD options.  ARB offers two lockers (RD180 and RD181, depending on carrier break) and shows the R180A as being a 10-bolt ring gear with 27-spline shafts at 1.09"/27.8mm.  This "CD52P" LSD from Mother Russia might be just the ticket: https://www.ebay.com/itm/123629507939

 

I've dealt with this guy in Russia...very helpful and reasonable. Will look into this unit for the front axle of my truck. Thanks for the specification and the link.

 

At this point, I'd say running dual LSDs on that R51 would be pretty slick in itself...but since you're pushing the envelope by going EV...oh man...

 

I have dual LSDs on the S10 and it is terrific in snow and on ice. Unfortunately they use literally tons of salt on the city roads and highways around here, so after ten years I am losing the S10 to rust. (Donor body for the conversion was a 2001 model.)

 

Speaking very broadly here since I've not worked on an R51 and haven't scoured the FSM (yet?): the removal of the transmission alone will very likely be problematic.  The Transmission Control Module (TCM) provides input signals to practically every system on the truck.  Even if you keep the transfer case, the transfer control unit (TCU) uses TCM data.  I imagine much of this can be bypassed to some degree with some re-wiring (after all, it's just 12v solenoids doing the actual work, with some brains in between to keep anyone from engaging 4L at freeway speeds), so ideally the switch can be wired to provide basic signalling.  To that extent, I use an All-Mode switch from R50/QX4 models to run my air compressor and air lockers...so I'd reasonably expect the R51/D40/N40 switch to be repurposable to signal the transfer case to be in 2H/4H/4L.  But, it's a broad assumption having not looked into it.

 

The brake/traction systems also rely on TCM data.  On the plus side, if the transfer case is similar to the R50 versions (specifically those with All-Mode, including all QX4) then I believe the vehicle speed sensor (VSS) is on the transfer case and not the transmission.  There may be another revolution sensor that might need to be simulated, but you really have to hope that the TCM-to-ECM (Engine Control Module) is not deeply impacted as well.  The ECM in itself will be another problem.  Do you plan to use the gauge cluster, or will you have some other interface/display showing EV-specific data?

 

We are thinking alike on this.....I try to avoid electronic solutions in vehicles where robust mechanical systems can do a more reliable job with direct operator control. On the S10 I replaced the electronic 2wd --> 4wd switching with a mechanical shift lever and direct linkage to the transfer case. Will do the same thing on the Pathfinder. In addition, apparently there is an internal LSD-like internal clutch system in the Pathfinder transfer case that distributes power between the front and rear differentials. With proper LSDs front and back, I am fairly confident that I can eliminate the electronics and ABS-like regulation of this clutch with, as you say, a simple switch. And your intuition is correct....I will use an EV-friendly CAN-based display in place of the OEM cluster. See http://store.evtv.me/proddetail.php?prod=evicgevcu I have one of these units in the S10 and it works great.

 

Of course, everything really depends on what features/functions/system from the truck you want/need to keep.  My best recommendation there is to list out all those items, download all the FSM chapters for the truck, and review all the system descriptions.  The FSMs do a great job of describing function and indicating which systems/sensors are used and how.  The troubleshooting/diagnostic sections will also provide voltage/resistance data for sensors.  This way, you might be able to gauge which inputs can be simulated by switch and/or resistor to preserve a function, or otherwise trick a control module.

 

Once I have the all-mechanical stuff up and running, I will experiment with bringing the OEM electronic features back if possible. Would inevitably be a lot of work, and may even prove out not to be necessary.

 

Can't thank you enough for your excellent advice. Very kind.


Cheers,

Gerry

Edited by gkphoto
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No problem, Gerry!

 

Please keep us posted on this project, it sounds great!   Oh, and we love pics here at NPORA...post some up when you can.

 

 Again, having looked into an EV conversion recently myself (on a far simpler Nissan platform...practically without any electronics), I was definitely intrigued by the idea, so I absolutely want to see (and learn and contribute) more.  A particular Ford Ranger done by EV West several years ago struck me as the standard I'd want to achieve.  I'm planning to rebuild the engine and transmission later this year, so you've still got time to convince me (I do have shiny new headers in a box, and an eyeball on a turbocharger kit, btw...).

 

Sounds like you've had a great career, but sorry to hear about the accident.  Better to have some mobility than none, I'll say, so I'm glad you're able to make the most of it and hopefully there's still room for improvement.  This project is one helluva way to prove what you're still capable of.

 

As for the conversion, I was definitely seeing a declining cost for equipment, especially for salvaged OEM batteries.  For sure, an array of standard car batteries isn't any cheaper today than it was a decade ago.  And pretty funny to hear you've got two of the BMW i3 batteries already...it feels like those are almost brand new cars still!  Display looks pretty slick, too.  (BTW, for anyone looking, remove the "." from the URL.)

 

About the R51 transfer case...just to be sure, does yours have the "Auto" mode on the dial?  I knew the R51 to have the ATX14B All-Mode case (some R50s and all QX4s have the ATX14A), but I did not realize that the FSM also specs the TX15B as being an option (this was the only option on the Frontier and Xterra at the time).  The R50 uses the TX10A case, which is a lever-driven Part-Time 4wd unit, while this TX15B unit is an actuator-driven relative that lacks an Auto mode on the dial switch (that is, 2H/4H/4L vs. 2H/Auto/4H/4L).  More importantly, the TX cases lack the clutch-plate system—and consequently, a lot of complexity—that's in the ATX cases.  Presuming you have the ATX, I feel like it'd be worth exploring the TX...spitballing here, but probably easy to find, I'd expect it to be a direct replacement, share similar (same?) wiring harnesses, same output flanges, etc.  I'd probably still utilize the actuator system if I could (it read like there's a position sensor in it, too), if nothing more than to save the trouble of cutting into the transmission hump to install a lever and linkage, but perhaps the TX10A (also found on pre-MY05 Frontiers, Xterras, Pathfinders, and Hardbodies) would be a suitable donor for linkage, lever, and even shifter boots/bezels.  Food for thought.

 

Good call on getting the mechanical side of things sorted first, though.  Also, I decided to do an actual search to see if others have tried the Quaife...and sure enough they have, so I'm certain we're on the right path.  I prefer to do my own research on stuff like this (in this case, I would've never had a reason to bother looking), but I'm always certain I'm not the first to reach such conclusions.  This was the first result: https://www.clubfrontier.org/threads/quaife-qdf11l-installed-in-my-c200k-rear-axle.350923/.  The author used a QDF11L, which supports the carrier break theory as his 2015 Frontier S 2.5L would have a gear ratio of either 4.083 (49:12) or 4.363 (48:11).  It at least confirms that the overall carrier series dimensions are spot on, so now it's just a matter of confirming L4.

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As you've discovered, Hawairish is the Nissan diff guru. I don't have much to add here, except to say that I'd love to see a project thread on either of your 4x4 conversions!

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Hi All, 

I have a write up about my S10 4X4 EV conversion. Apparently too big to upload to this site, but if you are interested email me at gkphoto@yahoo.com and I will send you a DropBox link to the story with photos. 

Please note: The piece ends with the installation of a DC motor and controller.......The DC motor was powerful but overheated regularly on my daily highway commute. A couple of years later more efficient 3Phase AC motors and controllers became available so I upgraded. The vehicle has been running basically trouble-free for over ten years now.

Cheers,

Gerry

 

 

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi Folks,

A note on progress on my Pathfinder EV conversion.......

The front and rear LSD diffs recommended by Hawairish have been ordered: The rear is coming from Quaife in England, the front from Russia. 

All ICE hardware has been removed from the 'donor' Pathfinder. I had a machine shop fabricate a cradle out of 1/2'' steel to hold the Siemens electric motor, the 2:1 Torquebox, and the OEM transfer case in perfect alignment. After a fair amount of physical wrangling that setup is installed in place of the old engine and transmission. No changes to the drive shafts were necessary. Lots of room in the engine compartment to start installing other hardware: The inverter/controller goes in there, as do about ½ of the traction battery pack, an electric vacuume pump, an electric AC compressor, plus a compact a 5KW electric heater that will feed the stock HVAC system. The other half of the traction battery pack will be installed inside the cabin behind the second row of seats....third row of seats have been removed permanently. Diffs are arriving in the next week or two. 

An unexpected side-deal: The OEM Nissan automatic transmission and rear differential carrier & gears was bought by another Pathfinder owner, reducing the cost of the donor vehicle by more than half.

Will post some photos next time.

Cheers,

Gerry

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/9/2021 at 4:48 AM, hawairish said:

No problem, Gerry!

 

Please keep us posted on this project, it sounds great!   Oh, and we love pics here at NPORA...post some up when you can.

 

 Again, having looked into an EV conversion recently myself (on a far simpler Nissan platform...practically without any electronics), I was definitely intrigued by the idea, so I absolutely want to see (and learn and contribute) more.  A particular Ford Ranger done by EV West several years ago struck me as the standard I'd want to achieve.  I'm planning to rebuild the engine and transmission later this year, so you've still got time to convince me (I do have shiny new headers in a box, and an eyeball on a turbocharger kit, btw...).

 

Sounds like you've had a great career, but sorry to hear about the accident.  Better to have some mobility than none, I'll say, so I'm glad you're able to make the most of it and hopefully there's still room for improvement.  This project is one helluva way to prove what you're still capable of.

 

As for the conversion, I was definitely seeing a declining cost for equipment, especially for salvaged OEM batteries.  For sure, an array of standard car batteries isn't any cheaper today than it was a decade ago.  And pretty funny to hear you've got two of the BMW i3 batteries already...it feels like those are almost brand new cars still!  Display looks pretty slick, too.  (BTW, for anyone looking, remove the "." from the URL.)

 

About the R51 transfer case...just to be sure, does yours have the "Auto" mode on the dial?  I knew the R51 to have the ATX14B All-Mode case (some R50s and all QX4s have the ATX14A), but I did not realize that the FSM also specs the TX15B as being an option (this was the only option on the Frontier and Xterra at the time).  The R50 uses the TX10A case, which is a lever-driven Part-Time 4wd unit, while this TX15B unit is an actuator-driven relative that lacks an Auto mode on the dial switch (that is, 2H/4H/4L vs. 2H/Auto/4H/4L).  More importantly, the TX cases lack the clutch-plate system—and consequently, a lot of complexity—that's in the ATX cases.  Presuming you have the ATX, I feel like it'd be worth exploring the TX...spitballing here, but probably easy to find, I'd expect it to be a direct replacement, share similar (same?) wiring harnesses, same output flanges, etc.  I'd probably still utilize the actuator system if I could (it read like there's a position sensor in it, too), if nothing more than to save the trouble of cutting into the transmission hump to install a lever and linkage, but perhaps the TX10A (also found on pre-MY05 Frontiers, Xterras, Pathfinders, and Hardbodies) would be a suitable donor for linkage, lever, and even shifter boots/bezels.  Food for thought.

 

Good call on getting the mechanical side of things sorted first, though.  Also, I decided to do an actual search to see if others have tried the Quaife...and sure enough they have, so I'm certain we're on the right path.  I prefer to do my own research on stuff like this (in this case, I would've never had a reason to bother looking), but I'm always certain I'm not the first to reach such conclusions.  This was the first result: https://www.clubfrontier.org/threads/quaife-qdf11l-installed-in-my-c200k-rear-axle.350923/.  The author used a QDF11L, which supports the carrier break theory as his 2015 Frontier S 2.5L would have a gear ratio of either 4.083 (49:12) or 4.363 (48:11).  It at least confirms that the overall carrier series dimensions are spot on, so now it's just a matter of confirming L4.

 

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Hawairish:

My diff mechanic tells me that the Quaife QDF10L that you recommended was a perfect fit into the the OEM Nissan differential case. Will pick up the installed unit tomorrow in the city.

Thanks again for your recommendation. 

Cheers,

Gerry

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7 hours ago, gkphoto said:

Hawairish:

My diff mechanic tells me that the Quaife QDF10L that you recommended was a perfect fit into the the OEM Nissan differential case. Will pick up the installed unit tomorrow in the city.

Thanks again for your recommendation. 

Cheers,

Gerry

 

Awesome, glad to hear!

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