Jump to content

PathyGig12’s Build Thread


PathyGig12
 Share

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, R50JR said:


If it hits while spinning, it won’t end well for your fancy boots. You can get band clamps for a few dollars on Amazon.


Sent from my Pathfinder

It won’t hit while spinning because I’ll be able to line it up with the ball joint when I’m reinstalling the axle and see if there’s enough clearance. I’m not going to let it spin without knowing that it clears, that would be quite dumb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The snap ring arrived today so I’ll be reinstalling the CVs soon. 
 

I took some pics of the Warn hubs. The inner ring is missing from the damaged one because I had to pull it off of the axle so I could get the mangled snap ring out from behind it. You can tell where it was trapped and grinding against the hub. I still have no idea how it managed to get stuck in there, but I read in the chilton manual that Nissan recommends replacing the snap ring every time you remove it. I don’t think that’s necessary but I’ve removed it many times over the past couple years so that could certainly have been a contributing factor 

 

Normal:

 

p8c6YMs.jpg

 

Damaged side:

 

 

05oLrAJ.jpg

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The CVs are installed now. Sure enough the hose clamp was touching the ball joint just barely so I had to redo that side with a proper boot clamp.
 

I’m leaving the front drive shaft off the truck until I can get it to the driveline shop for new joints and balancing, but I locked the hubs anyway to see how the new boots handle the spinning. 
 

 

Its funny, I noticed when the truck was parked that it dripped a decent amount of oil over a couple hours, but I’ve been checking the level for the past month and it hasn’t dropped below the high mark at all since the last oil change. Before the last change i was using 10-40 in it, but I wanted to go a bit thinner for the cold weather so I first ran it with some Lucas stop leak for about a month or two and then switched to 5w-30 when I did the change. Before the stop leak it was losing quite a bit while driving but since then I haven’t lost any, even on the road trip. So I’m struggling to figure out how it could be visibly leaking but holding the high mark on the dipstick every week

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, PathyGig12 said:

Its funny, I noticed when the truck was parked that it dripped a decent amount of oil over a couple hours, but I’ve been checking the level for the past month and it hasn’t dropped below the high mark at all since the last oil change. Before the last change i was using 10-40 in it, but I wanted to go a bit thinner for the cold weather so I first ran it with some Lucas stop leak for about a month or two and then switched to 5w-30 when I did the change. Before the stop leak it was losing quite a bit while driving but since then I haven’t lost any, even on the road trip. So I’m struggling to figure out how it could be visibly leaking but holding the high mark on the dipstick every week

 

When I got mine I spent an afternoon degreasing and pressure cleaning the engine, steering rack, transmission, CV's, and engine bay, gives you a good base line to chase leaks as once everything is clean, it is easier to see where the leaks are coming from, one thing I noted was after a few drives I did have oil work out of areas I didn't quite get with the pressure washer. Each time I found some leaking down I cleaned it again (spray can degreaser and rag) and traced where it might be coming from and checked it again after the next drive.

 

After a bit of investigationing I discovered the right hand valve cover was loose and leaking.  Tightened up and and has taken the leak up for now, but I now know to keep an eye on it.

 

A lot of my gunk on my engine was from split CV boots, and a weeping power steering. Cleaned up and monitor, have added stop leak power steering fluid, and replaced CV's.

 

Long story short clean everything within an inch of it's life and it will make tracing leaks much easier, and once it's clean it's easier to keep clean. Plus it makes working on the engine so much nicer when you aren't covered with muck from fingers to elbows.

 

Just my 2c worth :)

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The CVs are installed now. Sure enough the hose clamp was touching the ball joint just barely so I had to redo that side with a proper boot clamp.
 
I’m leaving the front drive shaft off the truck until I can get it to the driveline shop for new joints and balancing, but I locked the hubs anyway to see how the new boots handle the spinning. 
 
 
Its funny, I noticed when the truck was parked that it dripped a decent amount of oil over a couple hours, but I’ve been checking the level for the past month and it hasn’t dropped below the high mark at all since the last oil change. Before the last change i was using 10-40 in it, but I wanted to go a bit thinner for the cold weather so I first ran it with some Lucas stop leak for about a month or two and then switched to 5w-30 when I did the change. Before the stop leak it was losing quite a bit while driving but since then I haven’t lost any, even on the road trip. So I’m struggling to figure out how it could be visibly leaking but holding the high mark on the dipstick every week

0b597844393de6443ecab6c61e5d9390.jpg

Good thing you caught it


Sent from my Pathfinder
Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Fr8Train said:

 

When I got mine I spent an afternoon degreasing and pressure cleaning the engine, steering rack, transmission, CV's, and engine bay, gives you a good base line to chase leaks as once everything is clean, it is easier to see where the leaks are coming from, one thing I noted was after a few drives I did have oil work out of areas I didn't quite get with the pressure washer. Each time I found some leaking down I cleaned it again (spray can degreaser and rag) and traced where it might be coming from and checked it again after the next drive.

 

After a bit of investigationing I discovered the right hand valve cover was loose and leaking.  Tightened up and and has taken the leak up for now, but I now know to keep an eye on it.

 

A lot of my gunk on my engine was from split CV boots, and a weeping power steering. Cleaned up and monitor, have added stop leak power steering fluid, and replaced CV's.

 

Long story short clean everything within an inch of it's life and it will make tracing leaks much easier, and once it's clean it's easier to keep clean. Plus it makes working on the engine so much nicer when you aren't covered with muck from fingers to elbows.

 

Just my 2c worth :)

 

Yeah cleaning it is definitely the correct answer here, but it’s time consuming and not much fun lol

 

Even without cleaning it should be evident in the loss of fluid though, and I’m not seeing any loss in power steering, engine oil, or transmission fluid 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was re-organizing the drawers and had to take a second to take stock of the sheer quantity of spares Ive got in the truck now because I was losing track.

Knowing my luck when it dies itll be one of the three or 4 things I don’t have lol

 

 

Spare parts as of right now:

 

-Both serpentine belts
-CV axle
-full sized Tire
-Ball joint
-TB gasket
-headlight bulb
-Original factory hub
-Inner and outer tie rod end
-Rear shock
-Stainless steel brake lines (haven't put them on yet)
-Idler pulley
-Fan clutch
-Fuel pump and sending unit
-spark plugs
- single ignition coil that fits cylinder 2-6
-Both thermostats
-Knock sensor 

-throttle position sensor

-fuel pressure regulator
-Radiator cap
-Ignition start switch
-Main relay/starter relay
-Blower motor relay
-Fuel pump relay
-Assorted fuses
-Inner and outer front wheel bearing and wheel seals
-Brake light stop switch
-Front camshaft position sensor
-Rear camshaft position sensor
-Coolant temp sensor
-Original EGR valve
-Original 6 injectors
-Original upstream O2 sensors
-Original MAF
-Original IACV
-Original charcoal canister purge valve
-Upper and lower radiator hoses
-Section of heater hose long enough to replace any single piece in the system
-Assorted sections of vacuum line and fuel line
-Assorted vacuum connectors and hose clamps
-Assorted bolts, nuts, and washers

-handful of mending brackets 
-Assorted electrical connectors and primary wire
-Gasket material sheets in cork,fiber,and silicone, as well as a tube of RTV
-Assorted O rings and crush washers
-Assorted small light bulbs for turn signals/tail/brake


Honorable mention for supporting stuff:

-Coolant

-chilton manual

-lots of tools

-Jack plus jack stand 
-brake fluid
-ATF
-power steering fluid
-Oil
-Stop leak, for both oil and radiator

-brake cleaner, PB blaster, and MAF cleaner
-Fuel system cleaner
-wheel bearing grease, CV grease, dielectric grease, lithium grease, and brake grease

-super glue, thread locker and JB weld
-Tire repair kit and 3 compressors (primary one, plus my tiny plastic one, and a hand pump for extreme emergency use)

 

 

Keep in mind all of this fits into those two drawers and a small black plastic box on top so I’ve got tons of room for cargo and groceries

 

RjuvWwh.jpg

 

8gyilGs.jpg


mhlnC3Q.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ha ha, those cases. I hate that they are black plastic instead of something light colored for contrast - because otherwise, they are irresistible for the price & functionality. I have several filled with Pathy parts in my garage.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Junk yard scores!

 

 

Found a silver hatch from an SE in great shape that even has the spoiler that I’ve always wanted. Paint still looks awesome except for one tiny rust spot. 
 

It came off of a 97 I believe, so I’m hoping the pre and post facelift hatches are interchangeable. They look to be, but I guess I’ll find out when I put it on. The spoiler will probably require relocation of the axe I have on the back of the rack, but that’s alright 

 

I also found another donor truck with the same interior trim color that had the overhead dome light assembly, so I swapped mine out. No more ugly holes from the previous switches. The same truck had two Yakima crossbars with ski clamps so I grabbed them as well, for $20 you can’t beat it. I’ll clean them up and they’ll be awesome for next season. The bars fit in the tracks and between the bars of my rack and hold the skis high enough that they clear the rack bars 

 

I won’t be able to install the hatch for a while since I’ll need to enlist a friend to help me lift it into position. In the mean time I’m putting a set of round rally lights on the front of the rack since I can’t get the original light bar to stop whistling and I’m not content with the output from just the smaller pods I’ve got on there right now. Plus I think the round styling will go better with the aesthetic of the rack. They’re off of Amazon and they aren’t a big name brand but supposedly they’re very focused beams so theyll reach further and won’t scatter the light a bunch. I can then move the pods to the side of the rack for lighting the surroundings if necessary

 

qFrhShZ.jpg

 

cYwN9Ri.jpg

Edited by PathyGig12
  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well she’s officially an SE now. New hatch went on last night

 

 

Just a heads up to anybody doing this in the future, the connectors from the truck to hatch are NOT identical. The donor truck was a 97 SE, and only two of the three connectors were the same. The third one from the truck is brown and it doesn’t match the hatch. There’s two main sections of wiring, the one that goes from the truck into the hatch, and the one that goes from the hatch wiring to each of the electrical components. Turns out one of the connectors between these two sets of wires is also different so I ended up needing to pull ALL of the wiring from the old hatch all the way to each individual electrical component and by some miracle all of them had the correct connectors to match up to the wiring harness from the original hatch.
 

The latch was a bit rusty but with a bit of WD-40 it works perfectly and still locks up with the doors. I just need to swap the lock cylinder from my old hatch so that the back glass is accessable, but I ran out of time last night. It was 3am and raining hard
 

In other news, I’ve been making an aluminum bracket for the rally lights but I’m running into fitment issues so it’ll be a while before they go on. The problem is the housing is interfering with the rack since the included mounts put them too high. I would need mounting tabs below the bottom of the rack for it to sit properly between the top and bottom of the rack. I’ll figure something out

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did have to scoot the rack forward by about 2 inches to accommodate the spoiler

Yeah, the rear wind deflector is probably more trouble than it’s worth but I too like the aesthetics & have kept mine. It’s functionality, however, is greatly diminished with a low mounted ROLA rack. It looks like that’s the older separate pylon version instead of the one integrated into the glass hatch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, RainGoat said:

Yeah, the rear wind deflector is probably more trouble than it’s worth but I too like the aesthetics & have kept mine. It’s functionality, however, is greatly diminished with a low mounted ROLA rack. It looks like that’s the older separate pylon version instead of the one integrated into the glass hatch.

Yeah I couldn’t care less about the functionality, I don’t see myself needing a spoiler for my style of driving this truck. It happened to come with this particular hatch and I like the look better so it’s a win win

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The primary purpose of that wind deflector is to blow air over your rear hatch glass to help keep it clear of dust. When I only ran load bars it was really quite effective. Not so much now.fdc761f4b3a6c781f875d5a100ffe6d8.jpg

Admittedly, mine was mistakenly installed upside down in this pic. That’s what I get for doing a late night reinstall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, RainGoat said:

The primary purpose of that wind deflector is to blow air over your rear hatch glass to help keep it clear of dust. When I only ran load bars it was really quite effective. Not so much now.fdc761f4b3a6c781f875d5a100ffe6d8.jpg

Admittedly, mine was mistakenly installed upside down in this pic. That’s what I get for doing a late night reinstall.

 Interesting! I never would have guessed that was its purpose 

 

Still, with the full size spare already blocking my back glass, dust doesn’t matter a whole lot haha

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Camping trip. The goal was Adam’s lake near Blair mountain , ended up pitching the tent a half mile from the lake after getting stuck in some mud. Had to use the hi lift and buried my second spare to winch out. The way in also killed my driver side CV on a nasty rocky hill. Somehow the inner joint pulled out of the housing, which shouldn’t be possible since it’s made to taper towards that end so it can’t overextend. Whatever, I’ll have to look into it. Bottom line, rather than waste time swapping it out, I pulled the front shaft again to avoid doing damage to nearby stuff and set off thinking we were almost there anyway. Whoops, big mistake. Driving into a marsh in the middle of the night is not fun with only two wheel drive, which is why we ended up getting stuck. We spent 4 hours pulling the truck out slowly

Next morning we took a different route out, and pathy did incredibly well for only two wheel drive. There was one section we had to ask a jeep for a tow up the hill because it was basically just a boulder field, but everything else just took some careful driving. Some pretty large mud holes and and a couple of snow drifts, but nothing impossible.

 

vCWMoT5.jpg
 

kb5Upxm.jpg

 

RDsBXQ6.jpg
 

ZBoV0mv.jpg

 

X7cSDpW.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hand winching out with a HiLift & a buried spare is definitely an educational experience (& I’ll bet an exhausting one). Kudos to you for the self recovery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hand winching out with a HiLift & a buried spare is definitely an educational experience (& I’ll bet an exhausting one). Kudos to you for the self recovery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, RainGoat said:

Hand winching out with a HiLift & a buried spare is definitely an educational experience (& I’ll bet an exhausting one). Kudos to you for the self recovery.

Hope I’ll never need to do it again. Luckily we had just enough room to do it by shortening the straps between pulls but without moving the anchor. Re-digging that hole would have killed me lol

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Colorado has so many nice places to visit. Given your altitude, what’s the effective season there? Ours is June - mid October though some trails will take until July to be clear of snow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...