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micahfelker

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micahfelker last won the day on February 7

micahfelker had the most liked content!

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About micahfelker

  • Rank
    NPORA Old-Timer
  • Birthday March 27

Previous Fields

  • Your Pathfinder Info
    Lifted '96 and stock '97
  • Place of Residence
    Bozeman, Montana
  • Mechanical Skill Level
    Standalone Tool Chest Mechanic
  • Your Age
    16-21
  • What do you consider yourself?
    Serious Off Road Enthusiast
  • Model
    XE
  • Year
    1996

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bozeman, Montana
  • Country
    United States
  • Interests
    Wheelin' and dealin'

Recent Profile Visitors

2,730 profile views
  1. It basically connects the back ends of where the control arms mount so they can't pull apart from each other, it doesn't prevent or effect suspension travel.
  2. Have you checked if it's thrown any codes? It's probably your ignition coil (In the distributor). I'd be willing to bet money. I've had this exact issue multiple times before and replacing the distributor has always fixed it.
  3. I just posted this in a different thread but I'll paste it here too since it applies: Here's my 2 cents. Lifting your rig is not going to devalue it at all, and any true car guy doesn't give a darn about value anyway, it's about what the car means to you. Lifting it is not gonna just make all your parts stop working all of a sudden or lead them to break more often than just driving the car is. As long as you do everything right you will have no problems. Increasing control arm angle theoretically wears it out faster but I've never had any problems with mine. As long as the angle is still within operating limits (in other words, as long as you don't use spacers) your cv's will still be within the limit they were designed to work at. I've said the same thing in another thread somewhere but basically you can put however much lift you want in the front as long as the spring still fits in the original strut. The cv axles were designed to work within the full range of suspension travel all the way up to full extension, so even if you could theoretically fit a spring in that held the strut all the way topped out all the time the axles would still work in 4wd fine. Of course you'd have other problems then but that's purely for example. You don't experience any problems until you add a spacer into the mix. Since a spacer goes on top of the strut it allows the suspension to drop to full extension PLUS however much the spacer adds, which allows the control arm and axles and whatnot to drop past the range in which they were meant to operate within. For example, if you have a 2" spacer on top of your strut, at full droop your wheel will be able to extend the full length of the topped out strut plus another 2 inches past, which is 2 inches lower than the axles were made to operate at. For the rear you can basically do whatever you want until you reach around 6" which is where you start running into driveshaft issues. Lifting your car isn't really gonna affect it negatively at all, it'll only benefit. You'll have more suspension travel, better handling and a better ride, better articulation, and have a way cooler car in general that can get places it couldn't before. When it comes down to it, lifting your car is making it way better, not worse.
  4. I would avoid spacers. And Duratracs are made by Goodyear. I have the 10ply version which I'd definitely recommend over the lower rating. I've heard of the lower rated ones having problems with sidewalls when airing down, but I've had no issues
  5. Here's my 2 cents. Find a new mechanic or ditch 'em altogether. Lifting your rig is not going to devalue it at all, and any true car guy doesn't give a darn about value anyway, it's about what the car means to you. Lifting it is not gonna just make all your parts stop working all of a sudden or lead them to break more often than just driving the car is. As long as you do everything right you will have no problems. Increasing control arm angle theoretically wears it out faster but I've never had any problems with mine. As long as the angle is still within operating limits (in other words, as long as you don't use spacers) your cv's will still be within the limit they were designed to work at. I've said the same thing in another thread somewhere but basically you can put however much lift you want in the front as long as the spring still fits in the original strut. The cv axles were designed to work within the full range of suspension travel all the way up to full extension, so even if you could theoretically fit a spring in that held the strut all the way topped out all the time the axles would still work in 4wd fine. Of course you'd have other problems then but that's purely for example. You don't experience any problems until you add a spacer into the mix. Since a spacer goes on top of the strut it allows the suspension to drop to full extension PLUS however much the spacer adds, which allows the control arm and axles and whatnot to drop past the range in which they were meant to operate within. For example, if you have a 2" spacer on top of your strut, at full droop your wheel will be able to extend the full length of the topped out strut plus another 2 inches past, which is 2 inches lower than the axles were made to operate at. For the rear you can basically do whatever you want until you reach around 6" which is where you start running into driveshaft issues. Lifting your car isn't really gonna affect it negatively at all, it'll only benefit. You'll have more suspension travel, better handling and a better ride, better articulation, and have a way cooler car in general that can get places it couldn't before. When it comes down to it, lifting your car is making it way better, not worse.
  6. Here's and idea! Sell the Scion and use the money to put one of those 2.5l Cummins motors in the Pathfinder! Then you'll get like 30mpg and it'll be cheaper than paying off that scion haha
  7. I know it's not what you're looking at but I will never buy anything but duratracs for my Pathy again, they're fantastic in literally every situation. AT-like pattern in the middle with thicker MT-like blocks on the outside all with good siping. They also have ridges between all the tread blocks as well for extra grippiness (I guess?). Regardless, this makes them super quiet (for a MT) and get really decent gas mileage, and they do well in all terrains. Great at clearing thick mud and snow, but also good for packed snow in town because of their siping, and the softer rubber they use doesn't harden up when it gets cold out which makes a huge difference for winter driving.
  8. That sounds pretty rad, you'll have to let us know how it goes once you get them in. I've seen one ifs r50 use coilovers adapted to attach to the steering knuckle like the stock struts do. I can't remember where I saw it but its definitely interesting
  9. Agreed, that group was the reason I deleted my facebook account. Everytime I'd go on I'd just get super annoyed with incorrect information and people who think they're God. And I wouldn't get a sfd from there either, as there are incorrect specs floating around which could be annoying to align best case and dangerous in the worst case
  10. Gotta love it when the driveway looks like this [emoji1598] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. It’s a whole herd! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. My tan rig is totally stock if you want I can take some measurements tomorrow of fender height and whatnot
  13. Fits the look really well. Great work man!!

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