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JimArm

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  • Content Count

    13
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  • Last visited

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About JimArm

  • Rank
    NPORA Newbie

Previous Fields

  • Your Pathfinder Info
    1992 4wd, 5sp
  • Place of Residence
    Potter Valley
  • Mechanical Skill Level
    Skilled/Experienced Mechanic
  • Your Age
    45+
  • What do you consider yourself?
    Rarely Go Off-Road
  • Model
    XE
  • Year
    1992

Profile Information

  • Location
    Potter Valley, CA
  • Country
    United States

Recent Profile Visitors

1,236 profile views
  1. I am sure nobody will be shocked at the news the gauge worked just fine all day yesterday. I don't want to argue, but I do not consider pulling the instrument cluster are replacing the voltage regulator with one that needs soldering in an easy fix. I would undertake that only with a complete failure of the dash units.
  2. I may have asked this before. On my bought-new '92 XE coming up on 100k, the gas gauge can't seem to make up its mind, occasionally showing full when full, then empty a mile later, then up and down, It could, of course, be the gauge or the sender, but the low fuel light never comes on. It must use a different sender. This is not serious, but I would like an easy solve if someone has it. Thanks, Jim Armstrong Potter Valley, CA
  3. After some more looking, it seems that the felt pieces may filter the intake for the evaporative canister. The part of the box above the filter, including the circular screen, look brand new, not even slightly dusty!
  4. I checked my air filter on my bought new '92 V6 (nice low 95,000 miles) today. it doesn't need replacement, but for at least the third time I got to wondering what the other stuff In the box is for. There are soft felt "things" held in by metal clips and some other stuff. They all look in good shape and I know if it ain't broke, don't fix it, but I am darned curious what they do. Also I wonder if the part of the intake that is inside the fender needs inspection. Feeling stupid after 27 years, Jim in Potter Valley, CA
  5. Perhaps if I had used the term "catch" instead of "latch" it would have clearer that I was not talking about the hinges. I could not find any discussion of either in the link above.
  6. I am glad there are folks still enjoying their old Pathfinders. I did search for posts about the tire carrier latch, the subject of this post, not the hinges. I would like to read any previous discussion of the maintenence of the latch if someone would post a link.
  7. This may be a "well, duh" post but worthwhile if it applies to your rig. I bought my '92 XE new and have swung the spare tire and its carrier open and closed exactly 3,292 times. Each time it has opened and closed just a little tiny bit harder than the time before. I checked the places it might be adjusted probably 14 years ago. I think the weight is best shared between the hinges, the latch and the support in between. Today, rather than try to adjust away its increasing stiffness, I got down where I could get a good look inside the latch mechanism. I oiled the shaft ends, then greased (with a Q-tip and lithium chassis grease), every part I could reach, paying special attention to places that showed wear and/or were shiny, maybe ten surfaces. After a thin coating and some opening and closing, it works so easily, smoothly and quietly it's scary. Five or ten minutes to a like-new assembly. Post if it works for you, Jim Armstrong Potter Valley
  8. The starter relay is right next to the battery, between it and the fuse box. It can and does go bad, often with strange symptoms. It is easy and fairly cheap to replace.
  9. The power steering belt is the easiest to replace, being on the front pulley. It also has to come off to do the others. I wonder if the lack of the splash guard contributed to its failure. My original point remains important: today is a good time to take a close look at the condition and adjustment of all of them.
  10. I had to R&R my alt and ps pump belts today. They don't need replacing at this point, but it seems that it would be really smart to do it before one or both break. We did them over my pit with the skid pan off and they were still a big pain to get off and on and re-tensioned. I think it might nearly impossible to do the job on the side of the road in an emergency. So if you any doubt about whether you might need to replace your belts, do it soon. Potter Valley, CA
  11. Thanks, I tried that link many times before it opened today. Even though it doesn't mention trying get more oil in the tranny by any means short of a new case (!!!), it sort of seems implied. I still wonder why Nissan dealers ignore this TSB. I think I will drain and fill keeping close measurements and condsider adding some above the fill hole, keeping track of that as well. I should mention I have detected no worrisome noises.
  12. I realize this is an old thread with the last post apparenly two years in the past, I has me stumped, however. In summary, it seems that Nissan made an engineering mistake nearly 30 years ago that caused the transmissions in thousands, hundreds of thousands or more to self-distruct, even "grenade." This defect went uncorrected for 7 years until my 1992 Pathfinder was maunufactured. It was corrected in 1995 and a Service Bulletin was issued in 1998. I have been unable to find a copy of that bulletin, but people who have read it say that these transmissons came from the factory over a liter low in oil causing the upper gears to go unlubricated. The owners manual and the shop manual I bought both recommend only inspection of the oil in vehicles with low moderately severe usage and changing it for severe service. The service manual calls for about 8 pints of GL-4. That is about 4 quarts or a gallon. This thread says an extra quart or more is necessary for safe, continued operation. I have inspected the trans oil regularly over 80,000 miles and found it full to the filler hole and clear and clean. Thinking it would be a good idea to change it anyway, I began to think about the necessity to overfill it and the means to do it. Over the past few days I have consulted with very nice and helpful folks at 3 Nissan service departments, 4 auto parts stores, 3 transmisson shops that specialize in "foreign" cars and the Nissan technical help line as well as thoroughly searching the internet. I have to say that I expected at least one of these to have heard of the short oil problem and had printed material that called for anything but the original gallon of oil. None did. What am I missing?
  13. Well, it has actually been somewhat over 70 years since I was a new person, but I am a new member here. It took me several tries over a couple of years to get past the guards at the signup gate. I started back then trying to get some input about changing the oil in my transmission and I will post in that thread after a while. I have a 1992 Pathfinder XE, 6 cyl, 5 speed, 4 wd that I bought new. It now has about 80,000 miles and has been a very satisfactory vehicle in every regard. I would guess at well under 1000 miles offroad. Except for some early poorly done warranty work, I have done all repairs and maintenance myself. I live in Mendocino County California and have a small ranch. In addition to the Pathfinder I have had a 1960 GMC 3/4 for 44 years, a 1959 Dodge 1/2 for 10 and a Ford 8N for 30+. I would say I have owned over 50 cars, trucks and motorcycles.

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