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Slartibartfast

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Slartibartfast last won the day on July 26

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About Slartibartfast

  • Rank
    That worked great, until it didn't.
  • Birthday 06/14/1991

Previous Fields

  • Your Pathfinder Info
    '93, mostly stock. Trying to get it reliable.
  • Place of Residence
    Eastern WA
  • Mechanical Skill Level
    Wrench And Socket Set Mechanic
  • Your Age
    22-29
  • What do you consider yourself?
    Rarely Go Off-Road
  • Model
    SE
  • Year
    1993

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Eastern Washington
  • Country
    United States

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  1. Hmm. Yeah, that's more pulling (some of) the alarm's teeth than removing it entirely. IIRC the R50 alarm is built into other things to the point where it may be difficult to nuke in its entirety.
  2. 42 is the throttle sensor circuit (TPS) according to my paper copy of the '87 service manual. The full list: 11, crank angle sensor circuit (sensor in the dizzy) 12, air flow meter circuit (MAF) 13, Cylinder head/water temp sensor circuit 21, ignition signal missing in primary coil 33, exhaust gas sensor circuit (oxygen sensor) 42, throttle sensor circuit (TPS) 43, injector circuit 44, no malfunctioning in the above circuits Later models added a few more codes, and, just to be annoying, moved the last three around. Later manuals list 43 as the TPS circuit, 51 as injector circuit, 55 as no malfunction. 42 doesn't appear on the later code charts, so I'm not sure why you're getting conflicting info there. I've found no reference to a fuel temp sensor in any W/D21 service manual I've gotten my grubby hands on. A loose plug sounds likely. If you look into the plug (assuming your '87 uses the same electrical plugs as my '93), the female pin is formed like a rectangular C with the ends touching. I tightened up a few loose plugs on mine by sticking the end of a knife between the pin and the plug body and pushing those ends inward just a little to make them grip the male pin more tightly. This probably isn't the right way to do it, but the plugs felt much tighter afterwards, and the idle issue I was chasing went away, so I'm calling it a win. There is a fail-safe that will drop the rev limiter to 2800 rpm. EF&EC-42 says it'll kick in if it's not getting a signal from the MAF sensor or if a fuel injector fails to chooch more than four times in a row under certain conditions, but the only mention of the TPS on that page is that the ECU fudges MAF data with TPS data if the MAF isn't working. So that's a little odd. Not sure what to tell you, but I'd check the MAF plug while you're in there, and pull codes right away if it goes into limp mode again. Good luck!
  3. Well now that is just bizarre. If you lock the rear gate again, does that lock out the starter again? And how did you go about disabling the alarm?
  4. ... that's tempting as hell. Jack's is, like, four miles from me. Is there some kind of signup or just a meet-and-go kinda deal?
  5. I'm not aware of stronger aftermarket CVs for these, but there are two different types of CVs out there. One has a tripod joint inner (for four-cylinder trucks), the other has six balls (for V6 trucks). I'm told the six-ball type is stronger. IIRC the tripod joint style CVs have a smooth shaft between the boots, and the six-ball type have a little narrowed section in between. Either will bolt up. In fact I've got one of each on my truck right now (had one set of each, went to re-boot and found I had one usable one in either set), so I guess I'll know which is stronger if I manage to snap one. Also, I'm buying CVs next time instead of rebooting. What a PITA that was.
  6. The lines are just a shortcut and a visual aid for getting the timing correct when you're first assembling it. If you've got 40 teeth between the dimples on the cam sprockets, and 43 teeth from the driver's cam sprocket to the crank sprocket, then it's timed properly.

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