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  1. After a long period of R&D followed by successful installs on the initial test group, who have racked up considerable mileage, hardware is starting to make its way out into the world now and we felt it was time to make a thread dedicated to our Pines to Spines SFD kit. This will be the official thread where you'll find a showcase of the rigs that are running our hardware and testimonials from them should they choose to participate in the discussion. Both 3" & 4" kits include: - 2x P2S Strut spacers - 2x engine spacers - 4x subframe spacers - 1x panhard bar drop bracket - 1x steering extension with universal joints - brand new fasteners (OEM hardware is retained) You will need to purchase or fabricate- - Longer brake lines - power steering hardline support bracket - extended sway bar end links - a missing link Note- OEM fitment skid plates will not be able to be retained. You will need to fabricate or purchase a SFD specific set. If you're interested in a kit please DM both @TowndawgR50 & @hawairish in the same message ( you can add multiple recipients to a DM) and we'll get back to you as soon as possible with availability and pricing. @02_Pathy @Ravens794 @Stpickens @Rockit
    12 points
  2. New Method wheels and Warn hubs installed Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    12 points
  3. Been lurking here a while, bout time to introduce myself and "Hoss" my '99 Pathy. We are based in Tassie (Tasmania, Australia) I picked up Hoss back in October last year, I was in the market for a 4x4 rig for our tow vehicle and off road adventure machine. It would be used to tow our camper trailer, and to to go out bush and explore the wilds of the Tassie wilderness. It had to meet several criteria: Cheap to buy initially Parts availability and parts pricing off road ability towing ability/power reliability So my search began, in Tassie and the Australia mainland all 4x4/camping/dirt bikes basically anything outdoors related etc... attracted the "covid tax" (a slang term down here for everything going up in price due to the new demand for camping and outdoor activities as people don't like to travel now) so all the Land Cruisers and Patrols that were generally pretty well priced were now pulling 2-3 times as much, $3k vehicles selling for $12k-$16k So I turned to internet searches of "list of most underrated 4x4" and "4x4 underdogs" and "Bang for buck four wheel drives" and so on... Three vehicles popped up regularly on the lists, and videos: Nissan Pathfinder, Ford Explorer, and Jeep Cherokee (the second two being as most of these lists/videos were American) Ford Explorers and Jeep Cherokees were not a very popular vehicle down here, they are here but just not in the numbers that Nissan Pathfinders are. I watched a lot of video reviews, and build logs, and made lots of parts and price searches across all three vehicles to build an idea of where I wanted to go. At the end of the day the Pathfinder just ticked all the boxes. So the search for the Pathfinder began. There was a white one on Facey Marketplace, it had been listed for some 6 weeks (hmmm, what's wrong with it???) so I went for a look, not bad, some knocks and rattles in the front end suspension, ran fine, and the CV joints were shot, over all the body work presented well, just had high kms and mechanical work that needed doing well within my realm of capabilities (probably a turn off to most), I left it there and told the fella I would think on it, I figured I was pretty safe walking away what's a few more days as it had been listed for 6+ weeks Went and looked at a green one listed at approximately $1k more than the white one, and it was a real mess, a real "single mum's taxi" kids rubbish and food and stains all through the back, no evidence of recent services or service history for that matter, shot tyres, scratched and flaking paint, and a mouthy lady owner who "Ain't budging on price, I know what I got!" So she got a Hard pass! from me. I went and had a look at a couple of Jeeps as well, they didn't really float my boat, being in Tassie and they not being terribly popular they tend not to be looked after as well, and a lot of the interior parts in them were falling apart and rattling, creaking or just didn't plain work, both had electric windows that had failed. So we come back to the first one, old mate had rung me asking if I was still keen? I said yeah, but I want to bring a buddy to look over with me to make sure I wasn't missing anything. He said he would consider offers, "oh hell yeah got him on the hook" looks like I was the only looker. So my buddy and I went, I had cash, and was willing to walk away if anything didn't feel right, or I couldn't hit my pre budgeted purchase price. Long story short, my buddy picked up a couple of little things I missed, raised them in front of old mate, and we got it for less than half the original asking price, winner winner chicken dinner. The cheap purchase price allowed me to budget rebuilding and servicing a lot of the vehicle as I seen fit. So I have spent the last few months in between Christmas and camping etc... collecting parts and have spent the last few weeks getting her done. List of works (so far): New CV joints/axles D40 Nissan Navara factory freewheeling hubs (2nd hand from wreckers) New timing belt kit New water pump New thermostat Cooling system flushed, and new coolant Automatic transmission serviced and new fluid Engine serviced oil, oil filter, air filter New steering rack boots New front struts New strut mounts New front raised springs (Kings) Second hand alloy rims (off a Patrol for offset clearance of the struts with bigger tyres) New Falken Wildpeak 265/75 R16 New Rear drawer 2nd hand Fridge slide 42 litre fridge (leftover from our old camper) 2nd hand roof cage, all repainted and tidied up Custom made roof rack mounts Hi-lift jack and holder Roll out awning UHF radio external speaker (UHF was already in car) The obligatory before picture: As she sits now: My custom roof mounts, these allow a lower mounting of the roof cage keeping wind drag down, and allow 6x bolt removal of cage. Awning and jack mounted: Rear drawer and fridge slide setup: Things left to do: Trim and straighten front bar Seat covers Missing link and skid plates Electric brake unit install Secondary battery install Get out and use her Thanks for reading, I aim to keep this updated as things get done, and hopefully have a pretty complete build thread before long. Cheers, Fr8Train
    11 points
  4. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    11 points
  5. All your images are really inspiring Hit me up on Instagram @darthfinder
    11 points
  6. @R50JR sent me an ebay link the other week for a Patrol switch panel and convinced me that it'd fit. I did some additional comparisons and agreed that it would. I had some concerns about how well the trim colors would match (there was a "K" gray, "W" light gray, and "G" tan, as far as I could tell), since it was clear the trim color codes were not the same here (my all-black interior trim is "G") and all the photos I could find seemed too tough to tell the exact tone. After some deliberation, I ordered the last pair of "W" "K" panels the seller had. After waiting a few days, they arrived. Product looked great. The color was a slightly brownish-gray. (My Frontier has a "K" gray trim, and it's not even remotely close). In hindsight, the light gray "W" might have been good contrast. But overall, I dig it. Fitment is good. Material quality is really good. Getting the console down from the roof and detaching the wiring harnesses from the backside of the sunglasses tray was the toughest part. Things may get a little more complicated once wires are up there. The company that makes them is Kenay Kustoms out of AUS. Unfortunately, they do not ship direct to the US, but I plan to reach out to them to confirm fitment based on the pics below. They also made color-matching blanks, except they were out of stock of them. The black ones were reasonably priced, ordered through the same ebay seller (dukes_4x4_and_camping) that sold the panels. Anyway, some pics below. Not sure what all I'll put in them yet, but it'll be way more useful than the worthless the sunglasses holder that doesn't fit any sunglasses I've ever owned. It does block the climate and compass readouts a little, but a slight head dip resolves that easily. It's not something I stare at regularly anyway. From this perspective, the color match is perfect: And it's too bad there aren't any cool Nissan switches to put here, but they would fit reasonably well:
    10 points
  7. Camping trip with @micahfelker and a really nice taco (tube bumpers f/r, sliders, 33 M/T’s & factory rear locker)
    10 points
  8. its good to be back in Idaho for the holidays!
    10 points
  9. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    9 points
  10. Hello again as it has been awhile. Well did another upgrade/maintenance to the pathy by adding a bumper that most likely not a whole lot of people have heard about. It’s not an ARB although it is very similar but it’s a MCC 4x4 Falcon Bull Bar 702-02. I think this bumper looks fantastic on the rig and that the updated fog lights they put on the bumper match my retro fits which make the aesthetics that much better to me IMO. This bumper was literally a direct bolt on and didn’t have to modify anything besides the fender liners which I then attached to the bumper so I could keep some stuff out of the air box inlet and other components. I then added some Ironman 4x4 Spot lights which are pretty darn bright and have some good range on them as well. The bumper is ADR compliant and airbag compatible which is nice as well Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    9 points
  11. Yikes. We've not replied here for a while. We still need to get a dedicated SFD thread going, too! Despite the delay, we've actually stayed busy with various side projects and other personal priorities. We've been very passive about the SFD sales, but perhaps also deliberately to ensure the equipped trucks in the field continue to yield satisfactory results. Last fall, I spent a few days wheeling trails in Sedona with @Rockit, who's got one of our initial kits, and the results were great. He's put plenty of miles on his truck "commuting" between CA and AZ to visit periodically. We've sold additional kits from our initial batch, too. In fact, @Ravens794 is looking to install his this weekend (teaser: the orange powder coat looks great!). @jlduthie has unfortunately been waiting for the border to open to grab his kit and for the weather to warm up to get it installed. And we're still waiting to help @RainGoat to get his installed (lol). That said, we're excited to have gotten those out and are looking forward to the installs this year. Jake and I are in discussion for the next batch of kits, including component improvements/redesigns and production quantities. We've also had some interest lately for just the strut spacers, so we may offer that this year. We also just finished our first revision of proper installation instructions; if I'm being honest, it's the authoritative document on SFD installs...in small part because no one has ever compiled them that we're aware of... but mainly because of the level of detail we put into it. A true brain dump from the several installations we've done. It'll go a long way towards demystifying the process, as well as providing comprehensive information in preparation to the installs. It's the perfect companion for these kits. Anyway, despite the hiatus here, we're still around and working on things. With 2021 having a much more positive outlook than that 2020 bull@!*%, hopefully we'll see more progress. Thanks for the interest! At this point, I think we're beyond our test phase, but hopefully we'll have some options and more updates soon.
    9 points
  12. Just hit the big 300 mark
    8 points
  13. Hey gang, Over the last 18 months I've really come to love my WD21 Pathfinder! So many quirks and features. If you were going to do a "Doug DeMuro style" review of your WD21, what quirks and features would you point out? I can think of a few, perhaps specific to my SE-V6 w/ Power Package It has a spoiler... haha You can engage the windshield washer without actually using the wiper blades Rear armrests on the outside, and seatbelt clips to keep the buckles nice and organized those LEGO wheels tho My 1992 doesn't have a check engine light... not that it's broken or depopulated, it just never came with one. period. gotta check those blinky lights on the computer! two tier roofline as a precursor to the 1st gen Xterras Old school switch-activated cruise control Gotta press that little button to get the key out - classic japanese style The triple "nostrils" on the grill "hidden" rear door handles Maybe if I collect enough I'll make a 'tribute video' on YouTube.... haha Cheers from sunny Colorado!
    8 points
  14. Shakedown run Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    8 points
  15. Not perfect, but works.. And i found and check little crack. I think that all this construction need more stiffness, cause sometimes i have shimmy
    7 points
  16. We remounted it after I finally installed my winch & cube lights. I genuinely can’t thank@TowndawgR50 enough. While it may look the same at first glance, it’s incredibly more solid. Additionally, all the edges are rounded & smooth. It actually feels beautiful to the hand. A little behind the scenes of what goes on at @spinestopinesoffroad Tiger Mountain Test Lab. It’s worth noting that this is the kind of care, skill & perfectionism that makes up their DNA. It’s just one of the many reasons I rely on the two of them for their sage advice regarding modifications of any substance.
    7 points
  17. So after one day of this thread being started, we've had a great amount of interest in kits! We're trying to respond to everyone as quickly as possible. As a heads up, we should mention that we're going to try to fulfill requests for kits in batches. Right now, we're basically down to a partial kit from our original batch of 8 kits, and we're in touch with the guys who we can help in the near term. As for the next batch, we're looking into new material costs, kit interest by size, and our schedules to see what we can pull off in short order. Since we plan to have a bit more variety in kits, this should also allow us to keep a few other items in stock or sell components separately, since there's also been a good amount of interest in that. I also want to request you post up any questions you have about the kit here, so we can share answers with the community. We've already gotten a few really good questions in PM's...there's a lot to know about SFDs, that's for sure, and historically, this information has been scattered around for the past decade. We hope to consolidate all that information here. In the meantime, let me expand on a few of the required items/purchases that TowndawgR50 mentioned in the initial post. These are the parts that most guys may already have, or have access to (via other posts around the forum), that we've ultimately decided to not include with the kit. In most cases, we can help with source or fabricate the parts, but the parts just haven't been deemed "kitable" for one reason or another. Also, we've got an instruction guide that'll go into much more depth than here. If you need further clarification, let us know. Longer Brake Lines: The SFD requires longer front brake lines, simply because of the nature of the kit. Custom braided lines can be sourced from various retailers, but 2008-2017 Rogue brake lines (OEM or aftermarket) can also be used. I run Rogue lines on my truck, and TowndawgR50 runs custom braided. Same is true for the rear brake lines, though this is SFD-agnostic. 98-04 Frontier 4wd and 00-04 Xterra 4wd rear lines are a suitable replacement (also what I run). Power Steering Hardline Support: There's a high-pressure hard line that runs between the power steering pump and rack that has a mounting point on the crossmember. The hardline is actually a hardline that has a heavy duty hose crimped to it, and there's a factory bracket near the union of the two line types. When the SFD is installed, that bracket must be detached from the crossmember to allow for slack on the line when the subframe is dropped. We've chosen to not include a universal bracket for this because relocation of the line has been rather variable on all our installs. The length of the bracket doesn't correspond to the height of the SFD because the steering rack has to be rotated a few degrees, and the line may need to be hand-bent a tiny amount to either allow for slack or clear the bolts on the rack bracket so they can be accessed for high-torque tightening. In the end, the final relative position of the OE bracket can be 2"-4" from the crossmember, and may also move forward relative to the cross member another inch or so. Additionally, the racks between early and late model R50s were different, as were the lines, positions, and even the bracket itself. Ultimately, no single bracket would work in every situation, so it's best that the installer make a simple bracket once the installation is complete and the resting position is determined. The bracket can be as simple as a vise-bent strip of aluminum or other similar strapping with a pair of holes. No matter the approach, this line should be secured, as vibration in the line may cause stress at the banjo fitting. Extended Sway Bar Links: This applies to the rear suspension only. OE-length front sway bar links are fine, since the sway bar positions are relative to the subframe. We can provide extended rear sway bar links, but they are not included with the kit since they're based on the amount of rear lift (which isn't a factor for SFD installs). Missing Link: Most people know about these and have one installed in some shape or form. For those not familiar, we're calling it a structural device that reduces flexing on the subframe by linking the lower control arm rear mounting points. This was not a factory item, but this community has long agreed that it should've been one, if for nothing more than to stiffen up the front or mount skid plates to. However, we have deemed the ML as a required item that must be either purchased or fabricated because the nature of the install increases leverage on the chassis where the rear extensions of the subframe are mounted. And yes, we have seen a failure on an SFD-equipped truck that did not have a missing link installed. Notably, we don't have a specific ML product, but it's something we can fabricate. Skid Plates: These can't be reused because the mounting positions will have changed. I also want add notes on the following items: Existing Strut Spacers: most guys are already running static strut spacers, which means the OE strut mount has been modified to accommodate longer bolts. Our strut spacers are designed to use the OE studs on the mounts, which means that it may be necessary to disassemble the strut to remove the bolts. We are able to provide a set of bolts and nuts to replace those for a small fee. Alternatively, if the OE studs were retained, they can probably be reinstalled if the OE mount was not further modified (i.e., drilled, welded). Otherwise, new mounts may be purchased from Nissan dealers. Existing spacers should not be stacked with our strut spacers. Camber Adjustment: Our strut spacer do feature a slotted body that allows for some amount of camber adjustment. However, these are primarily used for gross adjustment only; it's highly unlikely that an alignment shop will touch these for service work. The use of camber bolts is highly recommended, and may be required to dial-in alignment. The guys in our initial group have not had any issues getting a shop to align their trucks with a single set of bolts (I want to say one of the trucks didn't use camber bolts at all). Our trucks use 14mm bolts. As stated above, we've got installation instructions, and all of the above points (and more) are covered in it more detail. We're considering breaking out some the topics into smaller sections (it's a long read as-is) before posting links to PDFs and such. But for now, we'll trickle out that information here so that it's a bit more public.
    7 points
  18. Apologies in advance this is gonna be a big post, lots of photos to dump! Me and my buddy Vic in his lifted Taco from Sunday's wheelin' trip these first two are on the way up to the top these next few are us at the top of the little mountain chillin' for a bit ***** FAT ASS ALERT ***** Last but not least, post mud pit... Hollister Hills SVRA, California
    7 points
  19. Had some fun with the truck this weekend!
    7 points
  20. Pathy got me into some powder this week trying for a last minute solo elk hunt. Sea of orange meant I had to look for super remote forest roads to get lost and then hike in. No luck this time but had fun anyway. I’m still amazed how these trucks can just fire right up with no complaints after being parked for days at 11,000 feet in 5 degree weather. But she does need a good bath now.
    7 points
  21. Ran rug road to turkey creek this week, what an incredible trail and area!!
    7 points
  22. Nice drive in the Colorado colors
    6 points
  23. Bennett Pass - Mt. Hood National Forest - Oregon
    6 points
  24. of the weekend in pinamar beach, buenos aires, argentina
    6 points
  25. Got to Tillamook for a short while this morning. Or looking for Elsa as my 4 year old says. It’s the only way I can convince her to come with
    6 points
  26. Escaped to the woods again this last weekend.
    6 points
  27. Well, there it is. With the un-ceasing oil consumption of my R50, I have decided to move onto a different platform while the pathfinder is still worth something. I have alot of love for this community, and will continue to stay in touch, especially on youtube and instagram. But, I started on NPORA, and I'm grateful for the resource that this forum is. It's put me in touch with alot of great people. I'll miss you guys This is my replacement, a single owner 2001 4x4 V8 Tundra. I suppose I've joined @mjotrainbrain by hopping from the R50 to a toyota 4.7.
    6 points
  28. She performed flawlessly on the first camping trip of the season. Went out to Central Oregon. I did a little light off-roading - in addition to finding a great camping spot my daily car would have never been able to get to. In the off-roading portion the Pathy could perform beyond my confidence level being my first off-road vehicle. I’ll probably slow down with mods for a bit as I push my own limits and find out what it needs next for my uses.
    6 points
  29. 1st shakedown trip done and dusted, the only thing that needs work on is my front sway bar mounts, by the end of the day they were pretty noisy. Any ways here is some pictures of Saturday arvo wheelin' in the wilds of Tassie. I got a few pics, but I will keep it to pictures including the Pathy to stick to the "random pictures of your R50" mantra, no one wants to see a heap of pictures of the Tassie bush. The crew for the day, mixed bunch, 4, 6, and 8 cylinders all represented The day's location Borradaile Plains Hut. Hut was originally a cattle grazers and snarer's hut, the original hut burnt down in the 1950's, but was rebuilt soon after. It is privately owned, but visitors are accepted as long as the site and buildings are respected. Pathfinder picnic table: Pathfinder sunset:
    6 points
  30. Finished the parking brakes on the Frontier today! I'm very pleased with how it turned out, far better than what I did on the Pathfinder. The other night I determined that the 300ZX brake kit wasn't going to work. The return springs were too short, as were the anti-rattle pins. Figuring that if the Passport parts worked, maybe a kit for the Passport would work, too. The kit arrived today and worked out perfectly...so perfectly that I'd say 100% of the kit pieces are compatible with the WD21 brakes. The parts on the left are from Carlson 17396 for the Passport (and several other Honda, Isuzu, and Acura vehicles 1994-2015), and the parts on the right are from Carlson 17418 for the 300ZX (and Q45, both 1990-96). The kits differ by the return springs at the top, and the anti-rattle pieces in the middle (pins, round springs, and retainers). The blue springs, red/orange springs, and adjusters are identical. Everything from the kit got used (well, except the c-clip and spring washer...didn't bother, wasn't needed). The return spring design is a little different from OE, but worked just fine. The proof: I'm stoked to have all that sorted finally. If you're ever missing parking brake parts for your disc brake-equipped WD21, find a Passport or Rodeo (or others). And now... Parking Brakes, Redux I mentioned in my post the other day that I was going to try a totally different approach by splicing the WD21 and D22 cables together. The results came out great. I've not explored if the exact same approach can be taken on the R50, but should be the same fundamentally. Since I did this on the D22, I'll try to explain it in R50 terms as best as possible. The pics, of course, will be of the D22 because I'm not even going to redo the R50 (I think I tossed those lines anyway). Specialty tools wise, I used: a hydraulic crimper like the one used in the original project — for crimping the wire stops and butt splice connectors lineman's pliers, or something suitable for cutting 1/8" steel wire rope (small bolt cutters would work, too) a knock-off Dremel with a flexible shaft and metal cut-off discs — for cutting off crimp rings and cutting the parking cable outer sleeve and pinch clamp (Oetiker) pliers — for tightening pinch clamps on the rubber boots and hoses used to protect the parking brakes (optional?) Hardware: 2x 1/8" ID wire stops (I was going to use aluminum ones, but ended up using copper ones instead) 2x 1/0 (or "0") AWG butt splice connectors (I bought some from a local True Value that still carries hardware assortments, but they're available on eBay) 4x-8x single pinch hose clamps (18.2mm to 21mm; McMaster 5435K31) (...also optional) 5/8" ID thin-wall rubber hose (to cover the connector and protect the line; the stuff I grabbed at the hardware store was a thinner wall for plumbing use and was sold by the foot) The parking brake cable is two main parts: an inner cable, and an outer sleeve. For this approach, we're only splicing together the outer sleeves. The inner cable remains fully intact, minus cutting the ends and crimping new wire stops on. Before cutting the outer sleeve, make 100% sure the inner cable is pulled out of the way (cutting the inner cable in the wrong place is definitely not a good thing). The rest of the cable is just rubber boots, tubes, and brackets used for protecting and attaching the cables to the truck. Nissan uses compression rings to secure the rubber on the cable. The outer sleeve is made up of a metal "tube" and a plastic/vinyl jacket. The tube is actually a thick spring, which is why it's both rigid and flexible. I recommend a Dremel and small metal cut-off wheel over other means. An angle grinder with a cut-off wheel should work fine, but might be a little overkill. Just be sure to not distort the core, since it is just a spring. If needed, use a reamer, or jeweler's file, or other deburring tool to clean the opening, since the inner cable will need to pass back through without snagging. The end should also be flattened (the piece in the pic was scrapped, so it wasn't cleaned up). The cable has a 10mm outer diameter. I initially tried a 2/0 AWG connector, but it was too loose. The 1/0 connecter was a perfect slip fit, not loose, and not tight. The parking brake cable is mounted to the backing plate by a metal "foot" that is crimped to the outer sleeve. We're leaving that crimped part intact and cutting several inches away from it. I did 10" for this application, but something a little shorter (6"?) would be better. Not too short, but not too long. This will make it easier to sheath the cable with another rubber hose. (Remember, it's far easier to shorten something than it is to lengthen it...so be sure to cut enough material to work it.) The process starts by breaking down the WD21 cables to get the foot. Technically, you could just caveman cut right through the entire cable without doing any prep-work here. All that needs to be done here is to salvage the "foot" off the cable with enough of the outer sleeve still attached, and to keep the spring. Everything else won't be needed (you can try reusing the hose, but I preferred buying new stuff). My approach was to: Cut the exposed inner cable at the very end of the cable, farthest away from the foot. Remove the inner cable from the outer cable. Keep the spring. Use the Dremel to cut all the compression rings (I made two cuts on opposites sides of the ring...made it easier to remove the ring halves than make one cut and fight to pry it open). On the end farthest from the foot, I slid the boot down and cut the outer sleeve. Remove all the hoses on the line, leaving about 3' of outer sleeve with the foot at the end. Maybe keep the boots if they're not trashed. Now, the process repeats on the truck's cables. Start by cutting off the wire stop at the very end of the inner cable (cut right up against the stop), the pull the spring off (doesn't get re-used). Now, this is where things get tricky. On the D22, there's a short (18") tube that protects the line and is in between the foot boot and another up the line. On the R50, I think the tube is a little longer and is held in place by the brackets. Obviously, this tube obstructs where you'll be cutting. If you want to salvage the tube, you'll need to loosen up enough things (such as the brackets) in order to slide the tube up, exposing the area of the outer sleeve to be cut. If you don't care about the tube, you can just cut through it, but you'll still need to cut back enough to expose the outer sleeve (you can always put a larger ID tube over it after it's spliced). From here out, take your time with measurements and cuts. Definitely measure thrice, cut once. If you cut even a little too short, it's hard to find any slack to make up for it. Take your time. Start by mounting the WD21 cable to the backing plate. Make sure as much of the R50 cable is routed and attached in its normal position along the trailing arms (in my case on the D22, attached to the frame and routed over the leaf spring). Bend the WD21 cable to contour the original path of the R50 cable, then mark a suitable position on the R50 cable to cut (wrapping tape around it helps). This should probably be about 6" from the R50 foot. Make sure you also leave enough space to slide any protective hoses up the cable so they can be slid down after crimping. BEFORE YOU CUT ANYTHING: Follow the cable to the middle of the truck, where they connect to the parking brake lever and tensioning mechanism. You must pull the inner cable out enough so that it won't be cut! You may have to pop a dust boot off of a mount to do so. Cut the R50 outer sleeve only. You may need to detach the cable from the trailing arms so that you have room to work in. Once cut, reattach the cable to the trailing arm, again routing it in its normal position. Bend the WD21 cable again to contour to the desired path, aligning it to the cut end of the R50 cable. Check and double-check the cut position on the WD21 so that it'll meet up tightly with the R50 end, then mark the WD21 cable. Detach the WD21 foot from the backing plate, then cut the sleeve. It may be wise to leave a little extra on the cut, since the cable can flex if it's a little too long. If it's a little too short, it could be a problem. Once both cables are cut, you can confirm the lengths by slipping the butt splice connector on them. Do not crimp it at this time; it's just a test fitment. It should end up like this (well, similar...this is the D22 of course): You can see in this pic the connector is not crimped and that I have already mocked up the boot at the end. At this point, there's a bit of an order-of-operations. You must have everything in place on the line before anything is crimped. That means any boots, pinch clamps, the butt connector, protective hoses...everything must be in place first. Once the butt connecter is crimped, nothing else can be added or removed to the line. In my case, I left (or created) enough slack to slide a longer piece of tube that will get slid down. Reattach everything to the truck. Bolt the WD21 foot on the backing plate, and R50 cables on the trailing arm again. Everything should be snugged up a little, too. The reason is that the cable must be in its normal resting state with it's all crimped together, otherwise you'll hate yourself later. You can also push the inner cable back through the sleeve from the middle of the truck now. If it jams where the cables meet, you can move the cables around to guide it through. Once everything is attached correctly and pieces are on the cable, you can crimp the butt connecter. The hydraulic kit has a "50" and "75" die for 1/0 and 2/0. respectively, but a "60" would have been better here. The 75 is too big, and the 50 too small, but the 50 needs to be used here. Don't max out the 50 crimp! Instead, feel for a stopping point on the hydraulic crimper before the dies meet—this is the point where the crimper is starting to apply excess pressure to the spring core. I imagine the crimper could surely collapse the core, which would be a very bad thing. So, crimp firmly, but carefully. It should end up like this: Keep pressure on the outer sleeve while crimping to ensure it stays fully engaged in the connector and doesn't create a gap. At this point, you can slide down any protective hose over the connector, or crimp the pinch clamps on the boots or elsewhere. Here's how mine turned out: This is the RH side, but the LH side turned out almost the same. Also, don't rely on any numerical measurements here when you change sides. Just because you cut 6" on the RH side, doesn't mean 6" will work on the LH side. Despite all the warnings above, the only thing I forgot to do was put a pinch clamp on the outer protective hose. Now...I put earlier notes that the pinch clamps were optional. It seems like Nissan used the compression rings on the rubber parts mainly to keep moisture and debris out. I'd say you could use hose clamps instead (I did on the LH when I forgot), but the pinch clamps were a nice substitute to keep an OE look. I wanted the protective hoses clamped specifically to keep water out of the line and eventually working its way into the butt splice connector. The ones I got from McMaster were perfect. I imagine you could also use CV boot band clamps, but these pinch clamps were far easier. As far as the rest of the setup goes, just take your time. Other key points and suggestions: Slack all the inner cable lines as much as possible before cutting the wire or crimping anything on. This includes loosening the parking brake cable adjuster from inside the truck. This way, you can tension everything up later (it'll surely need to be tensioned regardless, so leave room to tension it). After everything has been slacked, start with one side. The parking brake system is designed to equalize pressure to both sides, even when one side engages first. You need to determine which side might have less cable exposed to work with at the adjustment point I think the R50 is fairly equal. But on my D22, my RH cable was only shortened 1/2" (where the OE wire stop was cut off), while I needed to cut 2" off the LH cable, because of the way it's connected. Do one side first. Pull the inner cable enough so that it is taut. Use the parking brake shoe with the lever to confirm a suitable crimp spot for the wire stop. Cut the wire behind it (i.e., leave space for the wire stop), cut 1/2" of insulation off the cable end, then crimp the wire stop on (the wire stop must be on the steel portion of the cable, not the insulation). Fully assemble the parking brakes (shoes, springs, rotor, etc.) on this side. This is so you can confirm sufficient slack was taken up at the lever point. Now, do the other side. Be sure to pull the cable taut, then repeat the wire stop installation and parking brake assembly, including rotor. Adjust the tension on the parking brake lever according to spec (see FSM). Again, I'm super pleased with the results, but there was a LOT of "think" time to check and double-check (and even then, I still forgot that clamp). Definitely pay attention to the order of operations when cutting or crimping anything; it seems very easy to make a little mistake that will render a component completely useless and require a complete replacement, if not a bit more corrective work.
    6 points
  31. Right under the Nissan emblem Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    6 points
  32. Well, more R50 fun this break! I took a family trip to the phoenix area, and of course had to hit up a few of the locals..... It was great having @hawairish and @R50JR show me some Arizona trails Views from the top Patrick was very kind to let me take his beast up some of the obstacles. His special "All mode" locker switch is awesome, and this thing absolutely walks anything you point it at. R50JR had no trouble keeping up (minus a few high clearance obstacles ) with his Lokka / super LSD combo either. We got some video as well, so we'll see how that turns out!
    6 points
  33. 6 points
  34. Camping over the weekend
    5 points
  35. I mean he's not wrong if you're looking at the pathfinder as an on-the-road, get from point A to point B, vehicle. It doesn't do anything great, performance is meh, and comforts are limited. It didnt look like they took it offroad which I would think is the number one reason we but this car. It does 90% of what a 4runner does at half the price. Maybe even 1/3 now with covid prices on toyotas.
    5 points
  36. Plus a few more pics because why not Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    5 points
  37. Make sure you’ve read about & know the differences in the strut top hat - you need that spacer. The OEM one is welded on, most aftermarket are not. You will be very impressed with these new clamshell spring compressors - they work great. The notches on the bottom spring seat and the top spring seat must be aligned as shown. Note that the side of the strut shown in the photo is the inboard (engine-facing) side. When reinstalling the struts, orient the "L" or "R" on the strut insulator (aka "top hat") so that the "L" lines up with the notches for the left strut, and the "R" lines up with the notches for the right strut. [XPLORx4] Finally, I’m not sure with that spring set but you may need to lengthen your rear brake line. Extending the breather never hurts but Nissan did a good job of tucking it right under the cargo area floor & it will still reach fine, even with the Britpart NRC9448 springs. It’s on my ToDo list but really, I’m very unlikely to get that deep - it’s really up there on mine.
    5 points
  38. Wilco Hitchgate spare tire carrier finally arrived. I went with the high clearance model. It isn’t cheap but it’s well designed and built like a tank. The spare tire relocation bracket and Rotopax mount bracket (which mounts between the tire and rear hatch) is still backordered but I’ll post pics when those arrive.
    5 points
  39. If you install the 2" spacers, you could potentially have binding issues with the front CV axles while the wheels are off the ground. This side-effect seems to be influenced by the particular brand of CV axle on your vehicle. The best way to confirm whether you have binding or not is to install the spacers, then rotate the front wheels (with hubs locked) by hand and feel for any resistance or binding in the inner or outer CV joints. If there isn't, you're probably OK. If there is binding, you may damage the CV axles on any type of terrain that might cause either front wheel to max out the suspension travel. Therefore, avoid such terrain. Also, another common side-effect of 2" spacers is extreme positive camber, which may be correctable with camber bolts. After installation of the spacers, you'll need an alignment.
    5 points
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